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Sauce garnish

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

hi,

i cnt find a particuler name for a garnish tecnique,

its when u put a ball of sauce eg mash etc and run your spoon through it

its abit of a silly one but it would be good to know the name for this

as shown in the picture below

DSCF3001.JPG

post #2 of 23

I don't know what it's called, but I wish it would go away.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

oh please tell me, it is an over used thing and doesnt even look that great but the name wud be so helpfull

post #4 of 23

Do those various sauce-plating approaches even have names?

 

Strange, but it never occured to me that they would.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 23

it draws attention to the main focus of the dish depending on that the focus of the dish is. in some cases the sauce is purely auxiliary hopefully as in this case. however the plate is round the sauce is a circle creating almost a "bullseye" to the protein it makes sense its simple that why people do it. get as "creative" as you want with plating but i see nothing wrong with this structure

post #6 of 23

It's called... brace yourself... a "spoon push."

 

BDL

post #7 of 23

I think it looks amateurish and unfinished.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

It's called... brace yourself... a "spoon push."

 

BDL


ow ow ow....i wasn't braced enough.  I see it with sauces but it makes those potatoes look like someone took a bite out of them.

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post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

It's called... brace yourself... a "spoon push."

 

BDL



Sounds like a yoga pose.  Or something I used to do with peas as a child.

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I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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post #10 of 23

Isn't it a gastrique?

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post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Isn't it a gastrique?


"Food Lover's Companion", page 262 "...syrupy reduction of caramelized sugar and vinegar..."

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post #12 of 23

Some of you guys are getting confused.  The question was about the potatoes, which were spoon pushed; and  not more liquid sauce, which was drizzled in a circle on the plate.  

 

The term for the technique used for the liquid sauce is called, in English, drizzling.  In this case, the drizzle was done as a variant of puddling.  Puddling because the sauce is not on the the food, a variant because the sauce does not cover the bottom of the plate and the food is not on the sauce. 

 

If the sauce was both on the food and the plate, the drizzle would be a stingy nappe.  As far as I know there's the word nappe doesn't translate into English in any other way.

 

All of these are minimalist ways of saucing and presenting garnish, and only work with very small portions to the extent they work at all.  In my opinion, they're the plating equivalent to "chick flicks," and overly precious.  But nobody asked.  Also, this particular plating fails, mostly because of the relationship of the spinach to the other two things on the plate.  The spinach shouldn't be touching the chicken, nor should it be in the center of the dish. Also, there's the odd geometry which rusandreas already pointed out.  But again, just an unrequested opinion.   

 

As Pete says, the word, gastrique, has nothing to do with plating. There's no reason to think the sauce is a grastrique.  At first blush it appears to be a jus, gracing a chicken breast.  However, it could be a beige gastrique, as for instance a reduction of stock, cider, cider vinegar, calvados or apple jack, and turbinado sugar.  Sounds good.  Why not?  

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/19/10 at 8:18am
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

its actualy celeriac puree.

and the original question was what is the teqnique called, which someone answered it as just a spoon push which does make sence i spose, but normaly they have french names dont they.

and a gastrique is a reduction of vineger or wine with suger sometimes used to flaver a tomato soup etc,

post #14 of 23

The use of gastriques has expanded quite a bit.  Lots of things are served with gastriques. 

 

Puree of celeriac or puree de patate... whatever.  The spinach is still in the wrong place.  Unless the chef is suggesting they should be eaten in the same bite, they shouldn't be touching.  Nor, should the spinach be given pride of place.  In the same vein, whether intentional or not, the spoon push suggests the diner should dip her bite of chicken into the celeriac puree.

 

BDL

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 

ok, im just a commis chef, and my head chef does all the plateing ideas, but from what ive said he doesnt know much, so when useing a spoon push, thats suggesting it as a dip, is that what u meant?

post #16 of 23

Quite so.

 

BDL

post #17 of 23

Anybody but me notice that the chicken looks like a face? Probably the only interesting thing about that plate, for reasons that go beyond those BDL expressed (must be his day to be diplomatic )

 

If I were being frank, I'd have to say whoever plated that dish has been watching too much Iron Chef America, and missed the point. I don't find anything about it either appetizing or visually appealing. Good thing I'm KYH, and not Frank, isn't it? Ol' Frank can be pretty harsh.

 

Hey, Boar: How come it's called spoon push when the spoon is most often pulled?

 

I wasn't aware that puddling had to cover the plate. Always though that so long as the sauce extended beyond the boundaries of the item puddling was the word.

 

I also think it's a long stretch to think of the sauce on that plate as being even a variation of puddling. Oh, wait. Mebbe so. The chicken is just touching the end of the sauce ring, right there where the spinach is soaking it up.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #18 of 23

I wasn't going to say anything but I sort of thought at first glance it looked like an angry but hesitant PacMan chicken; upset because someone finger-swiped some of his celeriac and hesitant because there was a glob of greens he'd have to eat to get to the perpetrator.

I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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post #19 of 23

Nice plate!

It has no name in french. You'll have to invent something. I suggest "dérapage" in french, skid in english. Dérapage sounds more cheffy... hahaha!

 

BTW gastrique is the liquid used for making béarnaise, a reduction of vinegar, p&s, white wine, shallot, tarragon... It can be bought as such.

post #20 of 23

I'm not sure I want to add "skid" to my culinary vocabulary. "dérapage" may sound good to non-French speakers, but in French it sounds too much like something just went very wrong.

 

post #21 of 23
If the technique was called skid, would the result be a skidmark?
"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerm713 View Post

If the technique was called skid, would the result be a skidmark?

 

I was trying to avoid being that explicit..
 

post #23 of 23

Dérapage is not offending.

Go for "swoosh", it's also the reference to the Nike logo, also a dérapage if you ask me, in fact two in a row.

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