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Giving Compound Butter as Gifts

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Im thinking of giving compound butter as gifts this holiday season. I was thinking of storing the butter in wire bale jars with labels and bows. While I know you cant actually 'can' butter, this should keep the butter at least refrigerator stable for a couple weeks right?

 

I thought the jars would be a better presentation than the standard butter log.

 

As long as the usual sanitation standards are met during prep and the jars are clean and they are kept refrigerated..should I be worried of any other health risks??

post #2 of 14

Depending on how early you actually make the butters, you can freeze them. That takes some of the time pressure off.

 

Make sure whoever you gift them with understands that they need to be kept in the fridge.

 

Other than that, I can't think of any particular safety hazards. Sounds like a great idea.

 

One thing to consider. The smallest baled jar I've ever seen is a pint---which is a heck of a lot of butter to use up, no matter how good it tastes. You might consider either half-pint or even smaller (there actually are 4-oz canning jars available), and either go with the fancy lids & rings now on the market, or use a piece of fancy fabric tied in place to cover the lid.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks so much! I just want to make sure I have my bases covered...dont want to make anyone sick for Christmas smile.gif

post #4 of 14

That's such a good idea, what kind of flavors will you be combining?  If you use small 4oz jars you can give a small assortment which will also be very pretty.

 

Do compound butters keep as long as regular butter?  Do the herbs parish as quickly as they do on their own?

 

I once had a delicious pumpkin butter (it was a compound, not a jam) at a restaurant and can't figure out how they made it.  Any ideas?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 14

Really good Christmas idea. My address is....

 

But seriously, let us know how it turns out.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #6 of 14

Koukouvagia,


You asked,

 

Do compound butters keep as long as regular butter?  Do the herbs parish as quickly as they do on their own?

 

Yes to the first, no to the second. 
 

I once had a delicious pumpkin butter (it was a compound, not a jam) at a restaurant and can't figure out how they made it.  Any ideas?

 

Yes.  Nothing to it.  It's very much the same as any compound butter -- but you've got to make a little extra effort to get the pumpkin, butter and the various spices to completely liase. 

 

Here's How:

Soften 2 sticks of butter, cream the butter in a mixer at low speed, and add 3 tbs maple syrup, 2 tbs sugar, 1 tbs molasses, 1 tbs grated ginger, and a mix of whatever powdered spices you like with pumpkin -- for instance, cinnamon, allspice, and clove -- to taste.   The additions will cause the butter to break and become grainy.

 

Increase the speed to medium, add 3/4 cup pumpkin puree, and beat until the mixture comes together.

 

Alternatively you can do it in a food processor, but you've got to make sure (a) not to over beat; and (b) scrape down periodically to make sure it comes together evenly.  You can do it by hand as well, using a French whisk.  But it takes more strength and patience.      

 

When the butter is made, form into logs using cling wrap, or fill jars, cocottes or terrines in the usual manner. 

 

If you're going to hold more than a couple of days, hold in the freezer. 

 

And You May Also Want to Think About:

Making spiced cheese spread in the Boursin style, using a similar method.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/21/10 at 12:34pm
post #7 of 14

Just a couple of additions to BDL's post.

 

1. If you prefer, sub the maple syrup with honey.

2. If using canned pumpkin puree you might want to let it drain in a cheesecloth-lined strainer for a bit, to get rid of some of the liquid. There's a lot in there. Think in terms of draining yogurt as an example.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the tips!!

 

Im planning on making roasted red pepper butter definately...maybe rosemary/garlic. Need to come up with something sweet besides cinnamon/sugar.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by boydmar View Post

Thanks for all the tips!!

 

Im planning on making roasted red pepper butter definately...maybe rosemary/garlic. Need to come up with something sweet besides cinnamon/sugar.



Gingerbread or some other spice-cake flavoring? Nothing says holidays like gingerbread for me.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #10 of 14

Honey-Orange makes a nice sweet butter. Goes particularly well with breakfast muffins.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 14

Thanks BDL and KY, great ideas, I'll use them.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 14

Here's what I have for "sweet compound butters" in my MasterCook Compound Butter Cookbook:

 

Chocolate Butter
Cinnamon Butter
Cranberry Butter
Ginger Orange Butter
Hazelnut Butter
Honey Butter

Honey Vanilla Butter
Maple Butter
Mint Butter
Orange Butter
Pecan Butter
Strawberry Butter
 Walnut Butter

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #13 of 14

I tried to suggest compound butters to the owner of the local bagelry where I live.  They have flavored cream cheese but she totally did not get the concept of flavored butters.  It's too too bad.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #14 of 14

 Instead of a jar try buying throw away plastic 4 ounce, 6 ounce or 8 ounce tubs. You can freeze them most are air tight. You can even decorate with ribbon and bows. And even wrap in xmas paper

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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