ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Consomme from pork/wild boar?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Consomme from pork/wild boar?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Greetings -  Two weekends ago I roasted several racks of 'wild boar' for a wine dinner, and later used the trimmings and roasted bones to make a stock.  The racks were seasoned with just a simple dry 'game' rub, so I used a light hand to season the stock - just trimmings, bones, garlic, and a small bouquet garni.  The stock was rich and 'porky,' with subtle seasoning from the rub.  I liked it enough to wonder if pork consomme is made as often as other meat consommes.  My online searches implied this is not the case?  Has anyone out there made or used pork consomme?  Is the relative sweetness of the meat a detractor for consomme?  Are there blended meat consommes?  Thanks for the assistance.    

post #2 of 11

I have some old pork scraps from ribs in my freezer and was thing of maybe making a stock to. But what is the difference between a consomme and a stock, if there even is a difference? 

post #3 of 11

Fresh,

 

Consomme is a clarified soup made from stock, vegetables, and egg whites. Gelatin is also used at times, particularly for cold consomme.

 

Monk,

 

I have never tried to make it, but I see no reason why you wouldn't be able to.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
Reply
"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
Reply
post #4 of 11

A consommé could be seen as a "deluxe" soup, made from clarified stock. The clarification mass you use will not only make the stock completely transparent, it will also regenerate and add extra flavor.

After the clarification, you would add a very small "garniture", such as a variation of strips (julienne) or small cubes (brunoise) of softened vegetables, some fresh herbs, peeled deseeded cubed tomatoes (concassé), small strips of herb pancakes... Mind you, less is more.

Consommé is always served in small bowls, never in a plate. It can be served cold also.

It is though not made from pork, but, let noone keep you from trying. However, I would suggest to make stock from poultry; chicken, phaesant, quail. Or veal of course.

 

Once your stock is made and degreased, you can clarify it by mixing the following elements;

- feeding element; always minced lean beef, no veal. Use around 100 grams beef per liter fond

- aromatic elements; rough julienne of leaks, celery and carrot. No onion. A bouquet garni and some tomatopuree.

- clarifying element; 2-3 eggwhites per liter fond (lower ratio when making large quantities)

Mix these 3 elements and add some cold stock or water. Now add to the fond and stir. You can start with cold or boiling fond.

Bring to a very gentle boil again for 1-2 hours. Sieve and completely degrease(drag papertowels over the surface). There you go. Don't forget the garniture.

 

There's also Heston Blumenthals method;

Freeze the stock, but first pour it in a large flat tray. You will get some sort of a frozen plank of stock.

Put the plank on a cheesecloth and let it defrost at roomtemperature, of course catch the... completely clarified stock that will drip out of the cloth!

The natural gelatine in the stock seems to grab all the bits that need to get out of the stock to clarify. It all remains on the cloth, as long as you don't squeeze it.

post #5 of 11

Chris,

 

Where did you get the instructions for clarifying with an egg white raft?  It's got several important things very wrong, and wouldn't work at all. Not even close. 

 

Boil?  No way.  Sieve the raft out of the soup?  You'd undo every bit of clarification you just did.  And what's a "rough julienne?"  You must have been in a heck of a hurry.

 

BDL

post #6 of 11

Thanks for taking the time to try and explain the difference to me, the whole concept is new. I think i will stay with the stock making part and maybe just hold off on the consomme, just for the moment of course. 

post #7 of 11

Pork stock is very rarely used in European based cooking, it is usually more of an Asian thing. I make it on occasion and use it for stir fry sauces, some simple broths or chile verde.  I've never tried to use it as a basis for a consumme, could be interesting.  Doh, brain fart time - I can't remember the name of the dish that is basically potted pork sealed with a layer of fat.  Where's that internet search bar...

 

mjb.

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Chris,

 

Where did you get the instructions for clarifying with an egg white raft?  It's got several important things very wrong, and wouldn't work at all. Not even close. 

 

Boil?  No way.  Sieve the raft out of the soup?  You'd undo every bit of clarification you just did.  And what's a "rough julienne?"  You must have been in a heck of a hurry.

 

BDL



Well, that's the way I learned it and it works perfectly. One detail; where it says sieve, I should have mentioned "pour it gently through a cheesecloth". You can do it ladle by ladle if you want to.

Boiling; absolutely, and yes, a very gentle boiling! You should normally see a hole in what you call the "raft". The hole is made by the gently boiling stock. A rough julienne needs no further explanation.

The preparation was also called a "consommé double".

 

Edit; if you insist; read a roughly "cut" julienne.


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 10/23/10 at 5:52am
post #9 of 11

Hi Chris,

 

Not to hijack the thread and with respect, suffice it to say we have many differences on consomme.  Some of them may stem from the ambiguities of the English language and only need clarification -- for instance the difference between a "gentle boil" and a "simmer," and the non-sequitur of "rough julienne" -- while others are basic and substantial issues of technique, like removing the raft by pouring the consomme, raft and all, through a sieve.

 

Since it doesn't seem anyone is in a hurry to make pork consomme, let's leave it at that.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/23/10 at 9:14am
post #10 of 11

By all means BDL, rejoice us all with your very own recipe. I like to learn.

post #11 of 11

There already so many tutorials on clarifying with a raft combined with so little general interest, that writing a Cook Food Good type of recipe with detailed instructions hasn't been on my list.  If you really want people to pick your consomme technique apart, start a new thread and I'll be there.  But let's not hijack this thread more than we already have.

 

Also, please don't take this personally.  It's not a challenge, it's a soup.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/24/10 at 9:53am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Consomme from pork/wild boar?