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That looks good enough to eat! - Page 2

post #31 of 36

I've never known how plate things seperately.  I don't mind my food teaching (roast beef ontop of mashed potatoes for example) and I do tend to plate this way at home.  When I plate each item seperately on the plate it tends to look like a buffet dinner.  Not pretty.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 36

Depending on your target demographic, this isn't a bad thing.  Go to any of the big chain stores such as Chili's, Red Lobster, or Olive Garden.  That's exactly how their plates look -- three different items, sometimes touching, sometimes not (depending mostly on the consistency of the food, how much care the cook put into it, and how sloppy the server was in transporting).  But it isn't "bad", it's simply "normal". 

 

I think "plating" has a much bigger place in higher end markets.  When the quality of the food requires higher pricing, then you want the dish to be more visually stimulating.  For instance, if you've taken the time to make meat glace and gone through the extra expense, you must charge more.  It's now time to show the customer that you put that level of care into the dish.  If you started off with a boullion cube, no matter what you do visually, it's never going to command the higher price. 

 

I do like the suggestions on how to make minor changes, but when it comes to trying to make everyday food look like something out of a magazine, I think the point gets lost.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I've never known how plate things seperately.  I don't mind my food teaching (roast beef ontop of mashed potatoes for example) and I do tend to plate this way at home.  When I plate each item seperately on the plate it tends to look like a buffet dinner.  Not pretty.

post #33 of 36

but when it comes to trying to make everyday food look like something out of a magazine, I think the point gets lost.

 

I'd say that depends 100% on your personal viewpoint. For me and mine, the visual impact is an important part of the food experience, whether in an upscale restaurant or at home. But part of the reality is that I have the time, as well as the desire, to plate that way. Not everyone does.

 

I wouldn't say the point gets lost. Rather, that it doesn't matter for most people. Here's a comparison to show what I mean. Let's say you've got guests over; long time friends who don't need to be impressed.

 

If you plate fancifully, you'll get all sorts of ooohs and ahhhs and comments about how good the food looks. If you plate normally, you won't. But your guests won't be disappointed, either---as long as the food tastes good. So the question is: Is taking the extra step worth the time and energy it requires? There is no right or wrong answer; only personal choice.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #34 of 36

Dandelions or also appreciated in France as a salad. Interesting to know they call them "pissenlit" or "dent-de-lion".

Pissenlit refers to the diurethical qualities. If you want to know, pissenlit is composed of three words; the first word you know already + "en" meaning in + "lit" meaning bed.

Dent-de-lion means liontooth.

 

Early this year I also made -for the first time- what they call honey from dandelion flowers. In french "cramaillote". It's a jelly made with only the yellow flowerleaves. Quite a job and to be honest, a little disappointing in taste; the bitterness dissapears completely and it gets very sweet. Ah well. Somewhere in France there must be a region or town specialized in cramaillote, but I don't remember.

Interesting is that there are a lot of witchcraft inspired recipes going around, saying you should only use 365 flowers (1 per day of the year) when making the stuff...

post #35 of 36

And leave us not forget dandelion wine---also made from the flowers, IIRC.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #36 of 36

Just boiled up some dandelions for dinner to serve alongside a simple yellow split pea puree.  I usually boil a big batch on mondays and it lasts us through wednesday at least. 

 

My favorite part of the monday dandelion boil is a steaming cup of yummy dandelion broth followed by a fresh facial steam.  Once I remove the dandelions from the boiling water I drape a towel over my head and place my face over the steaming pot.  Great for my pores.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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