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Question about mace

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm making sauerbraten this weekend as well as gingersnap cookies.  I've never made either one before.  In researching recipes and making a shopping list I needed whole mace which I couldn't find.  So I bought ground mace.  Now I can't find the recipe that included mace to begin with.  I've never used mace in anything.  What kinds of dishes can I use it in?  And in what quantity?  I know it's the outer shell of nutmeg so can I throw some in my gingersnaps?  Use in the Sauerbraten gravy?  Since I spent $6 for the jar I'd like other ideas for its use.  Any help and ideas would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!!

post #2 of 9

I really like mace when making jerk chicken. I don't have a recipe that calls for it, but I usually throw some in, or substitute it for some of the other spices. Might be a good way to put it to use.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #3 of 9

It's the inner cover of the nutmeg nut.  It's a versatile spice which has been used in western cooking since pre-Christian Rome. 

 

You automatically reach for it when you're looking for a spicy/sweet profile.  It compliments ginger, nutmeg (duy), clove, and cinnamon.

 

On the more savory side, it's good in all sorts of stews -- especially things where you want a little spiciness.  Curries for instance.  It plays off anything slightly sweet well.  Mashed sweet potatoes, e.g.

 

Something like sauerbraten is right up its alley.

 

It bakes extremely well; and again, the common association is with a spicy/sweet profile, like pumpkin pie.  Good with any sort of spice or spicy/fruit bread like banana bread, pumpkin bread and so on.  I think most North American home cooks use it for holiday baking and otherwise forget it. 

 

Unlike whole nutmegs which hold for quite a long time, mace -- especially ground mace -- doesn't.  Write a throw-out date on the can 6 months from when you bought it. 

 

Hope this helps,

BDL

 

 

 

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks tylerm and BDL!   Think I'll throw some in the gingersnaps!  Jerk chicken sounds great.  Glad I bought it in time for the holidays.  I'll be experimenting.  

post #5 of 9

Boar, I thought that blades, when you could still find them, had keeping power. Was I misinformed?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 9

Try it in Béchamel sauce, just like nutmeg.

 

Or in mashed potatoes, or pommes dauphines.

post #7 of 9

Another suggestion, and I'm not sure why I didn't think of this earlier, would be to make Pfeffernüsse, which could be my favorite holiday cookie. I've never tried making them with mace, but I'm sure it would be great.  , w,  hich,, 

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
Reply
"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #8 of 9

I never used that one also but, I can suggest also that, you can make it as one ingredient in creamy white sauce. smile.gif

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Pfeffernuse is a good idea.  Haven't made those in years.  It's time for a revival!  Thanks tylerm.  Also the creamy, white sauce or bechamel idea would be fun to play with.  Thanks HomeMadeCook.

I've got my gingersnap dough in the fridge and will make those today.  The sauerbraten is marinating away and will go in the oven tomorrow.  I'm having such fun!

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