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austrian konditerai

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

ff

in austria there is a konditerai it has to be experienced and i would like to own one.how?where do i apprentice myself to learn hte classic pasteries and coffee secrets these provide?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

i am half austrian but my circumstances are not good, i am 27 but would like to one day claim this part of my culture, i suppose it probably wont happen and i will die as a failure to my blood and family.

 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

the idea of working in, making or owning a konditerai/kafe with indianner krapfen, krapfen in general, mohn knodel, mohnen rolls and tortes and different  gateauxs, dobos tortes, linzer, topfen struedel and topfen palaschinken, i think this could really be a wonderful cafe for people in america to try, and it would be nice to fire a few salvos at the local crepe vine with real austrian palaschinken. a lot of this i have in my family, as far as recipes and techniques, but we are not patisseries or pro chefs so i dont know where to begin with training, getting a business place, finding other workers etc. where do i begin?SUBMIT

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

so i guess chances of learning this or working in any austrio/bohemia/slavic/check/slovinian restaraunt are very very very small

post #6 of 9

Judging from what you would like to know, my suggestion would be to both check with the Konditerai for potential jobs (and therefore training) and/or catering colleges. If checking with the training colleges, make sure that the curriculum covers the subjects that you want to learn.

 

Basically, Step 1) Learn

               Step 2) Get A Mentor

               Step 3) Get Experience 

 

If the desire burns hot enough (that is you want it bad enough), you will get what you want and will not die as a failure. You need to talk to people and get advice and or a placement. Check with the local education provider in the field. Usually these colleges have support facilities for students/perspective students.

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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Well my german is not so good. I can only understand my dad. I would love to find out where to go in austria to learn the arts but I have no idea. is there a pastry school in austria? is there a european style pastry school here that is respected in europe?

 

I am told by my mother that the austrian kafe/kondorei trumps french and german and italian counterparts including all croissont and brioche baking going on, im not so sure, im sure these four pastry baking cultures inform each other

 

there is a french pastry shop here with petit four and brioche and croissonts, black forest cakes, matterhorns, eclairs and all kinds of others including chocolates, i should ask htem how to be an apprentice but i know everyone wants to do that. they are a stellar french pastry shop.

 

i also know of the george brown school in canada (toronto) and the orlando notter school as well as the pastry path at the cia.

 

i wonder how these three compare.

 

would the proper connections be made at any of these places

 

and how do i find a bout the scene in new york. some austrian pastry makers must be there. if i cant learn german well enough to train in austria, i hope that my answers lie in new york

post #8 of 9

In Austria, bakers learn by becoming apprentices.  A Baker/Konditor is usually 3 years.  You sign a contract, work in a bakery for 4 days/week, and go to school for 1 day per week.  Most apprentices usually start at 15 years old.  Pay is lousy, but at the age of 18 you can start to earn a real wage.

 

Operating a store, and baking are two separate items.  Baking  is only about producing product, running a store is about generating enough money to cover expenses and prepare for the next few years. 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

I see, thanks for the info

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