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Best shoes/boots for working grill line?

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

 

Do you have a favorite shoe specifically for working in the kitchen? Is there a general consensus among the community?

 

Do you have an opinion on whats better shoes vs boots?

 

Steel toe? 

 

 

Have any of you used quality (not from walmart) shoe inserts/arch supports.

Years ago when I was doing floors, I used a set of arch supports, it was like night and day and I was doing 3-4 grocery stores a night.

I am thinking about doing that again, my only reservation, I have to take out the insert that is already in a shoe to make space.

 

Thank you in advance

 

 


Edited by MacGregor - 11/2/10 at 6:46pm
post #2 of 30

 Dansko pro clogs

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post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 

Ieeniek thanks for the suggestion, seems like those are very popular (doing a bit of searching via google)

 

Anyone have any suggestions in the Sub 80dollars (US) range?

 

And about the Clogs, your feet ever get wet? 

 

Anyone ever wore crocs in the kitchen? I found some called Bistro Crocs (slip resistant/water resistant), anyone ever try those?


Edited by MacGregor - 11/2/10 at 8:20pm
post #4 of 30

Everyone has different feet, some people I know can walk barefoot until age 98 without any feet problems, not me though....

 

Steel toe?  Why?  You're not going to drop anything more than 20 lbs  on your feet--maybe a sack of potatoes, but no steel I-beams or jack hammers.

 

Boots?  They get mightly toasty in a hot kitchen, and if you ever spill anyting on your feet, will take too long  to get out of.

 

I happen to have flat feet and have been wearing custom orthotics for over 15 years now.  Cheap shoes or expensive shoes doesn't really matter, what matters is if the shoe flexes laterally:  That is, if I grasp the heel with one hand and try to twist the sole with the other, it should remain fairly rigid.  Cheap shoes--if well selected work O.K, and not all expensive ones work O.K..  If the shoe flexes laterally, it can not provide the support the orthotic or arch support needs, and your feet will let you know---fast!.

 

Malwart shoes will work, but remember, it's man made materials, and feet sweat alot.  Might be best to get several pairs and swap them out. 

 

Under a $100 shoes have one caveat though.  When the soles/heel wear out, it's impossible to get them re-soled or re-heeled.  Even if they're nice ones with leather uppers and a decent lining, it's impossible to get them re-heeled.

 

Hate clogs, it's a European thing.  When I did my apprenticeshp everyone was wearing wood clogs, drove me nuts, swore I'd never wear another pair--and I haven't since 1985.....

 

hope this helps,  

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post #5 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Steel toe?  Why?  You're not going to drop anything more than 20 lbs  on your feet--maybe a sack of potatoes, but no steel I-beams or jack hammers.

 

MacGregor -One of my best friends has been a cook for 15 or so years and his reasons are as follows, -there are a lot of heavy things, in the kitchen, industrial size cans of green beans etc etc and that if one of those were to drop onto his foot while he was wearing "softer" shoes he would be out of work for a couple days/emergency room visit. But then again, my friend, love him, but he looks like a biker, so maybe he just likes boots and steel toe is just a plus.

 

Boots?  They get mightly toasty in a hot kitchen, and if you ever spill anyting on your feet, will take too long  to get out of.

 

MacGregor -Good point. Although overall comfort is what would kill the thought of big heavy boots for me, I just wanted to know what you all thought.

 

I happen to have flat feet and have been wearing custom orthotics for over 15 years now.  Cheap shoes or expensive shoes doesn't really matter, what matters is if the shoe flexes laterally:  That is, if I grasp the heel with one hand and try to twist the sole with the other, it should remain fairly rigid.  Cheap shoes--if well selected work O.K, and not all expensive ones work O.K..  If the shoe flexes laterally, it can not provide the support the orthotic or arch support needs, and your feet will let you know---fast!.

 

Malwart shoes will work, but remember, it's man made materials, and feet sweat alot.  Might be best to get several pairs and swap them out. 

 

MacGregor-Think I may with go Crocs Bistro for now. Its middle of the road for me, not the "MalWart shoes" and not 100+.

For the feet, Goldbonds always does pretty good (not ideal but it will work)

 

Under a $100 shoes have one caveat though.  When the soles/heel wear out, it's impossible to get them re-soled or re-heeled.  Even if they're nice ones with leather uppers and a decent lining, it's impossible to get them re-heeled.

 

Hate clogs, it's a European thing.  When I did my apprenticeshp everyone was wearing wood clogs, drove me nuts, swore I'd never wear another pair--and I haven't since 1985.....

 

MacGregor Glad you mentioned it and you did help, thank you.

 

hope this helps,  


 

post #6 of 30

My favorite is the Alpro G500... but they're double your price range. 

post #7 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRock645 View Post

My favorite is the Alpro G500... but they're double your price range. 



Thanks for telling me anyway, something to shoot for. 

 

Those look amazing btw, a cross between a shoe and the dansko clog.

post #8 of 30

I had to learn to walk in clogs when I first started wearing them but otherwise I've had no problems.  My feet don't get wet at all, and as for steel toe, the danskos are fine.  They have a very firm toe to them and I have actually dropped cases of frozen sausage on them and I've never gotten hurt.

 

My only complaint about the danskos is the leather upper.  After over a year the leather upper is not in the best shape.  I will buy a second pair and keep the ones I have for when I have do alot of heavy cleaning as it was the chemicals that caused them to go like that.

 

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post #9 of 30

i tried clogs...tripped WAY too much.  one can only play it off for so long right?

 

honestly, i get the $12 velcro running shoes from wal-mart.  they are super comfortable...for about a month, but by that time they are trashed from being in the kitchen.  once i month i drop $12 and get a new pair. 

 

nowhere close to being fashionable, but i love em.

post #10 of 30

I lucked upon a pair of "sneaker-shoes" by New Balance at a DSW store, they were around $50 maybe less.  Plain black, very supportive with non-slip, oil-resistant soles.  They are amazing!  I wipe them down every few days and clean out the treads, I hope they last me a long time.

 

I don't get the clogs thing at all, seems dangerous to me...

post #11 of 30

Funny to watch people stumble around the kitchen in clogs, they seem to take some getting used to.  Boots for me, pay whatever it takes to find something that fits right. 

post #12 of 30

MacGregor:

When I was a seaman-trainee, it was mandatory to wear steel-toed, black, leather, work-boots, even in the galley. I still prefer boots in the kitchen, for ankle-support, and overall foot protection. I do buy insoles for my boots, and replace them as necessary. There different brands available, e.g., Spenco, Dr. Scholls, etc.

I concur with foodpump. You will need to spend $100+ for a decent pair of shoes or boots. The cheaply-made shoes are not repairable by a cobbler. I have never worn, nor will ever wear clogs! But then again, I have never followed fads, nor trendy fashions, nor do I care about being just like everyone else.

Something to think about... Kingston-McKnight Slip-Resistant shoes, features, ratings.

post #13 of 30

Why clogs? Someone does something stupid while you're standing near the deep fryer. 'Nuff said.

post #14 of 30

 

Quote:
 Why clogs? Someone does something stupid while you're standing near the deep fryer. 'Nuff said 

 

And how is a regular shoe going to save you.  Hot oil can still easily get into a regular shoe as it splashes up and over the edge.  And besides a clog is much easier and faster to get off.  That said, I have tried numerous clogs and my feet can't handle them.  My personal favorite shoe (and inexpensive) was called the Roebuck Lite.  Made and sold by Sears, it was a short boot that came up to just above the ankle.  It gave me great ankle support, was light enough that after 12 hours on my feet they didn't feel like dead weights, and kept my feet relatively dry in most circumstances.  I don't know if they are still being made, but I used to buy them regularly for about $40 ($29 when I could find them on sale).  I usually had to replace them about once a year.  Considering that higher end shoes and/or boots wouldn't last me that much longer I thought they were a deal.

post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post

 

Quote:
 Why clogs? Someone does something stupid while you're standing near the deep fryer. 'Nuff said 

 

And how is a regular shoe going to save you.  Hot oil can still easily get into a regular shoe as it splashes up and over the edge.  And besides a clog is much easier and faster to get off...

I took Allium's post to be in favor of clogs; in other words, to answer the question "why clogs?", one reason is that they're easy to get off should someone do something stupid with the deep fryer...
 

post #16 of 30

Pete:

Sears: Work-Boots, Slip-ResistantCulinary & Food ServicesRoebuck's Boots.

Kmart: Work & Safety, Slip-Resistant, SafeTrax: Work & Safety.

I did not find the particular model, which you mentioned. Perhaps it has been discontinued.


Edited by TheUnknownCook - 12/21/10 at 11:22am
post #17 of 30

I tried searching for it also and couldn't find it.  They must have discontinued it.  Sorry.

post #18 of 30

Personally I prefer boots in the kitchen, anything else and my back kills me at the end of the night, but thats just me.  Currently I wear a pair of beat up old doc martens on the line.

post #19 of 30

I used to wear open heeled clogs like many cooks do. Then I burned my foot badly while pulling a pan from a steamer back in 1998. The shelf of the steamer broke just as I was pulling out a pan and the water ran down my apron and pooled in my shoe. Now I wear a motorcycle boot made by Durango, They're tall, thick and have thick rubber soles. I think they're great kitchen wear. I soften the blow to my feet by putting gel inserts in them, sometimes I am on my feet for 15 hours and these boots are very comfortable and provide me with alot of protection.

 

Ken Harper

post #20 of 30

I have been wearing Rockport Steel Toe Work shoes for years, never liked clogs much.  These have EXCELLENT support, aren't very heavy by steel toe standards, have always been able to get about 2.5 years out of a pair which makes the $95 price tag very worth while, they are very comfortable to wear when you are on your feet for 10 hours and are slip resistant.

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post #21 of 30

I'll only add that whatever the shoe choice I prefer synthetic socks versus cotton for moisture control. They can be purchased at Sporting Goods stores or I seen them at Costco as well.

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR View Post

I'll only add that whatever the shoe choice I prefer synthetic socks versus cotton for moisture control. They can be purchased at Sporting Goods stores or I seen them at Costco as well.



Compression socks/stockings are THE BEST investment I have ever made.

 

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Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #23 of 30

At the commissary we have to wear the steel toed shoes they chose for us and all I can say is that they're horrible!!  All of us have a backup pair of other shoes that we put on when the work shoes become unbearable.  For me it feels like they're going to rip my heels off but I've found that if I wear a woolen work sock they don't have that effect so much and my feet are warm!  My department is refrigerated (literally) and we work at 4C so we dress for the weather..

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post #24 of 30

I've always been a fan do danskos or sanita clogs in a kitchen. Always rocked the danskos until a couple years ago, then a buddy turned me on to sanita clogs. They are just about the same price but sanita clogs seem to feel better on my feet, just personal opinion though, both are great clogs. I know money is tough for just about anybody these days, and is still always tough for me to drop 130+ on a pair of work shoes, it makes all the difference. A couple of weeks ago I was In hurry and ended up wearing shell top sneakers in, and my feet were killing for two days. The danskos and the sanita both have awesome arch support. 

 

Be forewarned tho, the first time I wore a pair of these clogs, I took two steps, rolled my ankle, and swore I'd never wear them again. They have higher heels, which actually help support your feet for long time comfort, but can be a little tricky to get used to for the first couple days, who knows tho, might just be me, I've always been a little clumsy. 

post #25 of 30

I think clogs are dangerous. A lot of guys including myself evaluate the shoe by the support, the non slip factor and the weight of the shoe. Shoes fo crews are pretty good, as are Rebock or Sketcher work type shoes(Not Sneakers).  Heavy shoes make your feet more tired. Ideal thing is change shoes sometime during the day, have 2 pair if possible and padded bottom socks(cotton). I have paid $89.00 for shoes and $39.00 the 39s were better and lasted longer. Also its hard for me to get shoes 14 double e size is hard to find.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #26 of 30

I'm 300 lbs and Croc Bistros work for me. Only Downfall is that two pairs in a row have had the bottoms separate after about a year.

post #27 of 30

I have been cooking for over 10 years and prefer a good solid work boot to other shoes.  best pair i had were a 14" steel toes mining boots (yes, mining boots,they were huge and heavy).  they were heat resistant, cold resistant, slip proof, water proof, and had every safety feature you could stick into a pair of shoes.  i dumped boiling water onto my boots and felt nothing.  the fry cook spilled oil while cleaning the fryers and i barely noticed.  with a good pair of quality boots (usually $250-$300) your feet are invincible.  you just need to be able to wear them, which i know is not for everyone.  unfortunately they only lasted a couple of years and the manufacturer has stopped production.  I would recommend anyone looking for a good solid pair of boots to wear in the kitchen to start with the Caterpillar brand.  but in my honest opinion, if you can find them, any boot with a gore-tex liner will suit you well; from 110 degree summer days when the AC goes out, to the -10 degrees for three hours as you rearrange the freezer.

post #28 of 30

Im a big believer in good pair of leather work boots and I have been wearing the same style for going on 8 years, i want ankle support something that is water resistant and solid heavy sole.  This is from Shoes for Crews http://tinyurl.com/jobzs6t, a lot of times your company can get a discount through them for free shipping or other types of discounts,  they are around 55 dollars so the wont break the bank, they last for a few years baring anything weird happening to them and i get the wide size to put a gel insert in them and still have plenty of room for my foot.

 

As for inserts i like the Doctor Sholl's work gel inserts, i have them in almost all of my boots either for working or hiking http://tinyurl.com/htrfxql.

 

I dont like the croc style shoes because of the open back but a lot of my guys wear them and they are cheap.

post #29 of 30
Quote:
 Steel toe?  Why?  You're not going to drop anything more than 20 lbs  on your feet--maybe a sack of potatoes, but no steel I-beams or jack hammers.

The other day a chef knife fell off the table and went straight down hitting the floor with it's point, bending it and putting a ding in the floor. Got me thinking, what if my foot was there?

post #30 of 30
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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