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Turning a potato

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

While I'm on a roll, this is a video of a half chateau and a tourne.  Not perfect, good enough for bistro service.

 

post #2 of 10

MAN.........If my French Chef saw that he would have a coronary.

 

Turning potatoes was a process that took only 6 turns. That was the rule. If you couldn't make the tourne in 6 turns you were incompetent.

Even the shape of the potato to begin with was important. Scraps always went to the bar for happy hour fries.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

HAH Six cuts?  Tourne is supposed to be seven, five if you're just trying to crank them out for dinner.

post #4 of 10

I ALWAYS TAUGHT 7

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

In real life seriously, unless you have loads of time, five sides is enough IMO.   You can do two half chateau potatoes in a minute.  I don't have the skills to do seven sides in the same amount of time I can do five sides.  I can do plenty of seven sided tourne, just takes me longer.  Anyway I hope people enjoy the two videos I have posted.  I'm trying to up the level here a bit.  Do they do videos on egullet?

post #6 of 10

Kuan, Thanks for the post.  I'd always been taught it was 7-sided for a tourne too, but can see how in the real world 5 would suffice.  And yummy happy hour potato skins deep fried with the left overs   Complete with sour cream and a sprinkle of cayenne - what better?

 

Seeing techniques as done in the real world is a great help. I've always wanted to try it but was never sure where to start.  As has been mentioned, the initial shape of the spud would help.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 10

Thanks again for another video.  However, I cannot begin to understand what is so great about this particular presentation method.  It seems to waste a LOT of potato.  Is this one of those fancy posh French things that gets taught in culinary school, but rarely used?  I've never seen one on a plate, or if I did, I didn't know it.

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

Gobbly, yeah it's rarely seen these days because it takes more time than tossing 20 potatoes in the oven.  Just like DC, when I worked the skins got fried and loaded with bacon/cheddar/brocolli/sour cream and whatever else you can think off.  Jalapenos, taco meat, salsa, you name it man.  smile.gif  Normally that was the dish guy's job to figure out what he wanted to put on it and it was left out on the employee table for staff to munch on.  They loved it and didn't eat so much lunch which meant we saved like $1 a person on employee meals.  (maybe)

post #9 of 10

It's a bit like prepping small carrots to look like baby carrots which aren't actually babies. Peel, take off the ends, then use the peeler to thin down the root end and so it's nice and pointy.  With the top end peel it down to a more blunt angle so it has the nice curvy look of a baby carrot.

 

Those deep friend potato skins sell well in many pubs here, all crispy then lots of melted gloop with a tonne of pepper and salt etc over the top.  The more salt they have, the more the punters order at the bar to drink.  Double bonus.  Good economy too.  The turning is probably done in more high end restaurants who charge like a wounded bull, as it takes a lot longer.  It's not often you see them like that these days.

 

Having said that, if you have the time to grab a bag of spuds and practice until you get it right for your own satisfaction - do it.  Do it when they are cheap and in season so you don't end up spending a fortune.  Sit down in front of the TV with your bag of spuds, board, and a knife, big pan of acidulated water and get used to the feel of doing it.  It'll become second nature eventually.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #10 of 10

Seven....and as a general rule in most cases always work with odd numbers never even.

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