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Chicken Corn Chowder

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

With the temperatures dropping just a tad, I've been making more soups/stews lately. Yesterday I made my version of a chicken corn chowder. I don't follow recipes anymore (unless it's baking) I haven't for a long time, but I thought I'd describe my approach and see what you guys might do differently.

 

Started with 5 chicken leg quarters ($4.55 make for a great chicken purchase) and brown both sides of 3 of them. Afterward a couple carrots chopped, and the tops of the celery including leaves. Just enough water to cover and salt & pepper. Let this come to boil then simmered for a couple hours. I couldn't skim it, but I didn't end up with too many funky floaters. I strained this all into a large bowl and let that sit. The chicken leg quarters were cooled, and then "pulled" of all meat. I was going to discard the celery and carrot but I couldn't help taking a bite about every 5th piece of chicken pulled

 

I skimmed about half of the chicken fat off of the stock, then returned the stock to the pot along with the pulled chicken meat. A large bag of frozen yellow corn kernels, 4 celery stalkes diced, 1 whole large white onion cut into small pieces, and a bag of small butter potatoes quartered joined the mix.

 

This all cooked down until everything was soft (a couple more hours) then the heat was turned off and 1 small carton of heavy whipping cream was stirred in. Using an immersion blender, I targeted the butter potatoes for a kind of slurry and created a thick chowder texture.

 

I am pleased with how it came out, but I did omit any kind of herbs, or bay leaves. What would you guys do differently? I imagine this would be very good with some andouille mixed in as well. I also didn't add any butter at all, I figured the chicken fat would take care of that and has it's own sense of richness.

post #2 of 15

splash of hot sauce, it adds a hidden depth. you couldn't say it was there when itis, but you will notice it missing when it isn't.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #3 of 15

Don't know as I'd have let the chicken poach that long. Seems to me it would pull all the flavor out of it.

 

When making stock with whole birds I pull the pieces after about 40 minutes, strip the meat, and return the bones to the stockpot. Gives me all the poached chicken I need for dishes that call for it, but with more than just meat texture.

 

I would have added a little thyme as well.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestion KY, I guess I didn't figure the chicken meat would have that much discernible flavor from the thickened stock. A good point though, more so I think for something like chicken noodle soup, so thanks for that. I actually have a thyme plant and was too lazy to go get some!

 

Thanks gunnar as well, I'll give that a shot. A bit like nutmeg in an alfredo?


Edited by eastshores - 11/10/10 at 4:15pm
post #5 of 15

Saute some corn, onions, hot pepper if desired, salt and pepper, add a little cream and blend into a pourable paste. Add this to the chicken stock and creme or milk or half and half what ever chicken, corn potatoesyou use. It will give a intense corn flavor.

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks that sounds great.

post #7 of 15

Even better: Grill the corn, allowing some of the kernals to char, before pureeing it. Brings a whole nuther flavor layer to the dish.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

So that would be a fire roasted corn chowder. I am thinking charred red bell peppers to go along in that mix, kind of a southwest corn chowder?

post #9 of 15

Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah. Set out the bowls, Eastshores, I'm heading your way.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 15

I had made some chicken broth and it came really well.  I used it twice for soup, once with pastina, once with galushka.  Then with the leftover and some chicken i made your soup.

WONDERFUL.  I loved the little pieces of corn popping in my teeth, and the warm ans slightly sweet taste of the creamy soup. 

thanks

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 15

If you like the sweetness of corn, no reason not to make corn stock. Just save your cobs in the freezer until you've got enough to make it worthwhile.

 

When I make it, I use the cobs and green husks (we're talking fresh corn, now), then either freeze or can the stock for later use.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

If you like the sweetness of corn, no reason not to make corn stock. Just save your cobs in the freezer until you've got enough to make it worthwhile.

 

When I make it, I use the cobs and green husks (we're talking fresh corn, now), then either freeze or can the stock for later use.


blushing.gif I used canned!  But "fresh" corn is not usually fresh, more like a few days old, and usually not too good.  Frozen is unfindable.   I have to use canned. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #13 of 15

Siduri, I've made stock from "fresh" corn found in the supermarket this time of year. You know that's more than a few days old. But for stock making (as opposed to eating) it's perfectly fine.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 15

Yeah, IF i can find it.  Not usually.  When i do it's usually old, unless i can get to the special market where hyou find stuff from many countries - then, in season, and if you're lucky, you can actually find decent fresh corn, not peeled already and not packed in a three-pack styrofoam container.  (sort of like american tomatoes!) 

If i do see it though, even at the supermarket, it will be worth trying this soup again. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #15 of 15

I love any form of corn chowder and I use canned, frozen and fresh each a distinct flavor and all are good to use.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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