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Saying no to turkey on Thanksgiving - Page 2

post #31 of 37

OK - if it is St Stephen's Day (26 December), perhaps its a corruption of our Boxing Day!

 

The idea of leaving food out and people coming in and eating it whilst I slept is seriously weirding me out!

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

 

The idea of leaving food out and people coming in and eating it whilst I slept is seriously weirding me out!

 

+1

 

Knowing me, I would probably wake up in the middle of the night, and forgetting what was going on, proceed to club an innocent man half to death. Sounds like a bad idea. But I guess bad guys can only run so far in Bermuda.

 

Lovely place, btw.

 

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #33 of 37

You could always go with Calvin Trillin's suggestion and make spaghetti carbonara.

 

My only serious opinion is to think (a) what your family likes to eat, (b) what's reasonably seasonal and truly fresh, (c) what you like to cook, and (d) what gets your family into the mood to spend a really significant time at the table. To me, that means think "finger licking." That could be fried chicken, BBQ ribs, duck, pork chops, who knows.

 

I have never yet quite set my foot down about the turkey issue, but the fact is that I can't stand it. A dead waste of a bird, frankly: give me duck, chicken, goose, quail, woodcock, whatever over turkey. Wild turkey, that's different, but domestic.... There is one good use for it, though: turkey gumbo. Oh yes. And if I had to cook a Thanksgiving dinner in San Francisco, I would make a kick-butt turkey gumbo with fried turkey chunks, fish, crab, lots of the Trinity, and a very dark roux. Serve it with turkey giblet dirty rice, a big green salad, homemade bread, and scads of beer and wine (as you please). For dessert, sweet potato pecan pie with sweetened whipped cream on top. Some year I will be permitted to do this here in Boston, and will simply replace the Dungeness crab with lobster, the Pacific fish with Atlantic, and go from there.

post #34 of 37
Quote:

Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer

 

I would make a kick-butt turkey gumbo with fried turkey chunks, fish, crab, lots of the Trinity, and a very dark roux. Serve it with turkey giblet dirty rice, a big green salad, homemade bread, and scads of beer and wine (as you please). 



Not sure about turkey and seafood. I personally would go for one or the other. The winter gumbos for us are chicken or duck and andouille gumbo, or seafood gumbo. But I like the way you think.

 

Also, not a fan of dirty rice with gumbo. I prefer long grain white rice. But to each his own I guess.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #35 of 37

Of all the islands I have ever been to, Bermuda is the best and most cultured and civilized and clean. The people are law abiding and educated. I was at one time planning on moving there. I love it there.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 37

"Roast pork leg sounds really good. Will you share the recipe?"

 

Babytiger,

 

I just do it very simply.  To serve 5 people with lefovers, I buy a 2.5kg/5lb Shoulder of Pork.  I prefer this to the leg, to me it turns out more tender.

 

Get it to room temperature for at least 30 minutes.

Score the rind and smooth on olive oil then rub in quite a bit of salt.

Pop it into the middle rack of your oven pre-heated to as high as it will go for 20 mins.  Get the exhaust fan on and the window open - there's going to be smoke!

Once the crackling is looking good and feeling crispy (test that with a fork if you don't have abestos hands - it should feel crispy), turn oven down to medium low .

Cook for 25 mins per pound

 

If you have a meat thermometer, and I'm talking the type that is a metal spike with a dial on the other end showing temp. for various meats, pop it into the thickest part of the meat without touching any bones.  Keep an eye on it every now and again, once it's got to pork, take it out of the oven to rest under a tent of foil for about 20 mins.

 

Usually I serve it with roast veg, like carrots, onions, potatoes, rutabago, parsnips etc which have been tossed thru some olive oil, S&P, dried rosemary, whatever you like.  Pop it into a separate tray for the last hour or so while the pork is cooking so they can come out together.

 

I cheat with sauces and dressing: storebought apple sauce, cranberry sauce, and if I can't be bothered making a gravy from the pan juices, a packet gravy eek.gif  Just depends on how far behind I am.....

 

Shoulder is a little tricky to carve.  Take the crackle off and break up into suitable sizes.  The meat may well fall off the bone so you can sometimes pull it off with 2 forks, but it should be nice and juicy and easy enough to carve.

 

There ya go!  DC

 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #37 of 37

Quote:

Originally Posted by tylerm713 View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer

 

 

I would make a kick-butt turkey gumbo with fried turkey chunks, fish, crab, lots of the Trinity, and a very dark roux. Serve it with turkey giblet dirty rice, a big green salad, homemade bread, and scads of beer and wine (as you please). 



Not sure about turkey and seafood. I personally would go for one or the other. The winter gumbos for us are chicken or duck and andouille gumbo, or seafood gumbo. But I like the way you think.

 

Also, not a fan of dirty rice with gumbo. I prefer long grain white rice. But to each his own I guess.



Basically agreed, actually. I like meat (including poultry) and seafood gumbo, but that's definitely a subjective judgment. As to the dirty rice, I would only do it at Thanksgiving, in order to make everyone feel like they're going to collapse in a heap after eating. Otherwise, no --- plain rice with gumbo, to be sure.

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