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country style pork ribs , what to do? High heat... low heat?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I was recently given a large package of pork that is labeled boneless country style pork ribs.  I have no idea if they are loin or shoulder.  What would you do?  grill, bake,  liquid, no liquid.   I am just learning the whole grill cooking thing.  I would like to fix these on Saturday for guests, if it is not too iffy as to how to cook them.   The ovens and grill wil be going that day. Any help will be appreciated.  I grew up with bbribs and beef short ribs not these.

post #2 of 16

I cook these quite a bit at home. I do mine in a wok at high heat. I marinate in Hoisen sauce, few drops red food color, sesame oil, pepper Chinese 5 spice, garlic, ginger in a plastic bag for 2 days. First make sure you cut them all the same size and toss constantly in the bag. After the wok  I put them in oven a few minutes then serve. Left over? dice it up for fried rice. Can be done on grill and usually real tender after marinade.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 16

Season to taste, flour, drop in the deep fryer.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ed this sounds good.  So are you cooking them untli done in the wok or finishing them in the oven and  covered or uncovered.

post #5 of 16

I would season to preference. Give them some good markings on a hot grill and then finish them in one of two ways.

 1. Move them to a cooler part of a covered grill and let them slow roast until tender.

  2. Place them in a baking/roasting pan with a liquid i.e. chix stock, beef stock, combo of the two or even just water. Enough to cover the bottom of the pan to about a 1/4 inch to a 1/2 an inch depending on the thickness of the cuts. Seal tightly with tinfoil making sure the foil does not lay on the meat as tinfoil will adhere to the product as it cooks. And again slow roast until desired tenderness.

  Personaly I am not a big fan of marinades. Especially the full flavored ones with elongated time frames. However I do like natural tenderizers. Tenderizers are a liquid with an acid be it a vinegar or a citric. You might try a fresh lime tenderizer for the pork. Keep in mind that acids will "cook" the meat and make it tough if left too long. 1-3 hours tops depending on the type/cut and thickness of the meat.

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

 The strips of pork are about 4-5 in long 1.5in  wide x 1in thick.  I love marinades, but I have never marinated anything longer than an hour other than jerky. The hoisen sauce has vinegar, so if left in that it could get tough then?  I do like the flavors he was talking about.  What about putting them in that type of marinade for an hour? Will putting them in the oven take away the grilled texture, taste etc?  I do not want them falling apart.  I should not even do this for the first time with company, but it is a huge pack and I always try different stuff out on the family.I can not wait to get the meat part of this menu out of my mind and on to the fun stuff.It is going to be an odd meal anyway .  We are trying to use up an abundance of garden produce.  This gathering of 35-40 people who have never had certain types of vegetables is going to be fun. Fresh  squash, brussels sprouts, turnips, spinach , and snap peas,  are all going to be used someway along with a few ordinary things like corn, and fresh fruit trays for the fussy little ones. There will also be grilled chicken, plain and barbecued. Cheesecakes are done, fresh breads will be made in the morning and a couple of unusual pies will be made Saturday morning.  I can cook , meat is just not my thing. I rarely eat it. 

post #7 of 16

I have been marinating them for years and never had a problem. If I put in oven I cover for a while because I do not want them to get to dark and loose their red rib like color.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 16

Country ribs aren't ribs at all and aren't part of either the back or the loin.  Rather, they're the top part of the shoulder as it joins the neck and "cushion."  It's actually a versatile cut which can be cooked fairly hot without getting too tough, but is really better for low and slow.  I usually prefer loin for most high heat dishes, and real ribs (spares and bbs) for "real" barbecue.  Country ribs are my "cut of choice" for many braises and stews, including chile verde.

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #9 of 16

We have always called it the Flap.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 16
Country style "ribs" are, as others have said, a versatile cut. If I'm doing a full batch of chili verde I'll use a butt roast. If I just want a few portions I go for the country style ribs. I often use them in stir fry dishes. One of my favorite ways to do so is cut them into bite size chunks. Dust the chunks in corn starch, season with some salt and a fair bit of black pepper. Fry them in the wok until nice and browned and crispy. Remove and set aside, do the veggies and sauce or whatever then return the pork to the wok to reheat before serving.

They are good on the grill, over moderately high heat. They are good when slowly braised in orange juice, garlic and black pepper [ http://wasatchfoodies.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=9 ] carnita style.

I hope you enjoy them.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #11 of 16

This afternoon I found a nice butt roast, and I'm making Chile Verde right now - smells so good!! smile.gif I will have to try it with the country style "ribs" next time, never tried that before.

 

Teamfat that carnitas recipe is inspiring me too.. I LOVE carnitas but have never tried to make my own. Probably my next butt roast will get that treatment! Thanks for the link.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks to all for the info.  I made the ribs the way Ed suggested and they turned out a hit, even though we had problems with the grill.  I marinaded for 2 days with his type marinade, grilled  them and then put them in the oven covered tightly no liquid until all the rest of the cooking on the grill was done.  I have to admit from someone who usually has saucy ribs, they looked like they were going to be hard and dry, but they were not. My youngest son hates sauces on his grilled meat, so he really liked them.

post #13 of 16

Those cuts grill really good as BDL stated, low and slow with your favorite pork rub and a little sauce glaze t the end. Grill them over heat first and then slow and indirect till they they become nice , soft and glossy in their own juices, then glaze if you like. Yum    yum    yum!

post #14 of 16

O.K.  you want to start with your  rib  rub. I like  to  use brown sugar, seasoned salt, onion powder, garlic powder, a little fresh thyme and oregano. You  can also use a little Spanish  paprika too  give  your ribs that beautiful red color. this  rub is  75 percent brown sugar. generously apply rib rub. Place  ribs  on rack in hotel pan. O.K. the next thing I'm going tell you is  probably going to seem a little strange. Very carefully add rather Coke or Pepsi to pan be  careful not to wash  of  your  rub then squeeze a whole lemon and  throw  the  whole  thing in. Your just want  to  cover your ribs pin the soda  pop. The  acid in the soda pop will make your ribs fall apart tender. so  be very carful  when removing from pan. Wrap pan over first with plastic wrap then with foil this will stop the steam from flaking you foil off into your ribs and  letting all pressure out  of your pan.  Bake for 4 hours at 325 .check frequently in last hour to make sure your seal has not been compromised you want to  keep that steam in the pan . Cool ribs on sheet tray . If  I were going to use a commercial sauce it would  be sweet baby rays and after my  ribs had cooled I would dip them in my sauce witch can be thinned  with the left over pan drippings then glaze on flam broiler.

Please let me  no how  you  like this.

post #15 of 16

Nice necro thread.... from 2010 :lol:

post #16 of 16

I  WISH EVERYONE A HEALTHY AND HAPPY NEW YEAR        

 

   COOK THAT HAM NICE AND SLOW  RUB WITH A PASTE MADE UP OF  OF DELI  MUSTARD AND BROWN SUGAR WITH A HINT OF GROUND CLOVES  EASY FOOLPROOF AND GOOD

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
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