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cooking with xlitol

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Help!! Am writing a menu for a healthy cafe and creperie. Owner wants xlitol sugar for all items. Tried it in sweet crepes, but was a train wreck. Am going to use it in scones, muffins and flourless tort, but don't want another disaster. Any one use this stuff in baking? We open in one week....

post #2 of 6

Hello!

 

I cook with xylitol often for health reasons.  I have not tried it in any cakes, but I have made muffins with it, and they turned out great.  Those rose well, even though there is a warning against using xylitol in anything that needs to rise.  It's not as in-your-face sweet as sugar, so measurements should be adjusted, or another sweetener, such as raw honey, should be added if something needs to be really sweet.  I've done lots of things with xylitol actually.  I've even made a 'maple' syrup with it, cooking it down with twice as much as water and a bit of maple extract.  It came out nicely and thickened up pretty well.  I've not tried in crepes, so I can't comment there,  But I use it in all my other dishes I frequently make such as apple crisp and peach cobbler.  I honestly think it will work fine in the muffins and scones.  Just play around with the amounts so you can get the desired sweetness.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info. Got restaurant open but still working out sweet crepes with xzlitol. the muffins did work great. Used stone ground whole-wheat flour only ( no white flours ) and added club soda for airiness.

post #4 of 6

Make sure you let people know your using xylitol.  My son has a liver disease, and loves to eat healthy.  Any of the alcohol based sugars such as xylitol and maltitol can not be had by people with liver problems.  It can actually cause active liver damage.

 

Matt

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the  tip! Didn't find that in my research. We do have it posted on our menus, but i will make sure its promenade on there.

post #6 of 6

Its a another sugar sub or Wood Sugar, as it is sometime called because it is derived from birch trees, and also raspberries.. Consuming to much could result in stomach problem and or the runs. Other then that can't really hurt you so I have been told.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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