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convertion

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Help

 I am converting a recipe for 8 people to a recipe for 225. The recipe calls for a 15.5oz can and I don't know how to convert it to a #10 can. Does anyone know how to convert it.  Food guy


Edited by foodguy - 11/23/10 at 7:12pm
post #2 of 8

16 oz in a pound, so in a 10# can you'll have just about 10x portions of 15.5oz.

post #3 of 8

Can Size Number

Approximate
Volume of Food

Approximate
Weight of Food

No. 1 picnic
1 1/4 cups
10 1/2 to 12 ounces
No. 300
1 3/4 cups
14 to 16 ounces
No. 303
2 cups
16 to 17 ounces
No. 2
2 1/2 cups
20 ounces
No. 2 1/2
3 1/2 cups
27 to 29 ounces
No. 3
5 3/4 cups
51 ounces
No. 10
3 quarts
6 1/2 pounds to
7 pounds and 5 ounces
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 8

Sorry, I misinterpreted #10 as 10#...

post #5 of 8

In the U.S., #300 and # 2 1/2 are the commonest sizes, with #10 pretty much confined to bulk foods and commercial usage---although it used to be more common at the retail level, when families were larger.

 

Given the on-going trend of lowering quantitites to avoid the appearance of a price hike, you can pretty much count on quantities being at, or a bit below, the ranges on Pete's chart. For instance, 12.5 ounces is getting fairly common as the net weight in #300 cans.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks to all for the information. I found out that not all #10 cans have the same weight.

Food guy

post #7 of 8

The wouldn't have, even before packers started playing games. Keep in mind the weight/volume figures are based on water. Anything more or less dense will have a different net weight.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 8

As a rough estimate, a #10 holds approximately 3 quarts, the weight of which will vary greatly depending on the item inside (chow mein noodles weigh a lot less than a #10 can of tomato paste).  I would get a volume measure of your 15.5 oz can and do the math from there.  It won't be perfect, but it will get you in the ballpark.

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