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Feral Hog

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I trapped and butchered two feral hogs this weekend, one a 200 plus pound sow, and one a 70 pound sow.  I have never cured and smoked the hams on a feral hog, and while there is a wealth of information on the internet I am curious if any of you have gone through the curing process.

 

Both hogs were skinned and quartered.  Unfortunately, when I left to get ice and ice chests, the sides (pork bellies) were discarded.  I really wanted to make some feral hog bacon and the large sow would have been ideal.

 

Any information would be appreciated. 

post #2 of 5

OldPro, are you looking a cure recipe? To be walked through the procedure? What?

 

Keep in mind, most of all you have to have a work area where it's cool but not freezing.

 

A real shame about the bellies. That's why you should never walk away when the butchering is going on. You could have salvaged the jowls, too, another great source of bacon.


Edited by KYHeirloomer - 11/29/10 at 4:43am
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

I would like to be walked through the procedure.  While I've cooked a lot of feral hogs, I have never tried to cure the hams.  The large sow was in perfect condition, and I really want to learn the best way to make some cured hams.  I know we will be trapping a lot more during the hunting season because they are such a problem on our hunting lease.  . 

 

I'll probably smoke the picnics tomorrow, and we have some excellent sausage makers in this area and  I'll have one of them process a portion of the hogs..  As you are aware, there is a LOT of meat on two hogs of this size.

 

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpro View Post

I know we will be trapping a lot more during the hunting season because they are such a problem on our hunting lease.  . 

 

I would be happy to drive over and do some extermination. laser.gif

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #5 of 5

Best source I've seen for the step-by-steps of curing and so forth is Ruhlman and Polcyn, Charcuterie.

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