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How To Cook Pheasant - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Thread Starter 

I have many friends from MN so saying it is a MN thing is all that need be said. It gets pretty cold up that way so having a good stock pile of anything canned is pretty normal. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Here at the farm in years past I have processed many a wild pheasant. We have a electric feather plucking machine that connects to a dry-vac. It works great, but you must be gentle otherwise the machine can tear the meat right off the bones.

Since there is so little fat on them I usually wrap the whole bird in bacon and slather softened butter on them. I get a roasting pan very hot in a preheated oven, then place the birds in the pan. Every 15 minutes I give the bird a 1/4 turn. It takes 45 minutes ++ to cook them.
The breasts are tricky as they can overcook easily, but basting them adds moisture and keeps them from doing so while the dark meat cooks.

Pretty much how I cook them but with the addition of chopped apples , a mince of onion , parsley, thyme and stuff the cavity.
A terrific combination when one mixes bacon and apple with pheasant . Simple but oh so good.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #33 of 36

 I like pheasant I've tried it once at a Renn Faire and it was delicious  I don't know how to cook it but I really want to make it once I hunt it or get it

somehow. Also a lot of the game I cook is more on the chewy side. Will pheasant be that way?? 

post #34 of 36

In years gone by, I had heard the term "Pheasant Under Glass," and wondered if same was actually served under glass.  (Thought it was served in French restaurants, for some reason.)  Out of curiosity, I did a search, and came up with this:

 

http://ochef.com/579.htm

 

Here's are some ideas - Behind the French Menu:

 

http://behind-the-french-menu.blogspot.com/2013/11/faisan-pheasant-on-french-menus-behind.html

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatCat FoodStar View Post
 

 I like pheasant I've tried it once at a Renn Faire and it was delicious  I don't know how to cook it but I really want to make it once I hunt it or get it

somehow. Also a lot of the game I cook is more on the chewy side. Will pheasant be that way?? 

It won't be tender like commercial chicken or turkey. Wild pheasant works much harder to survive and exercises its muscles more. This develops flavor, but also more structure. So yes, it will tend to have more chew than our common poultry foods. My niece raised a few turkeys in her backyard one year. These were large, lean and a bit tougher than commercial turkeys. Good flavor though. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #36 of 36

Thanks!! that was a question ive had for a while:smiles:

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