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One step closer to FDA overhaul

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

This is something that I haven't really followed, but it caught my eye as I was reading the NY Times this morning. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/01/health/policy/01food.html?_r=1&hp

 

The US Senate has passed its version of a bill that would increase the power of the FDA to recall foods and ramp up inspections. On the surface, this seems like a logical change: increase food safety, especially after recent salmonella outbreaks. However, I wonder what this potential overhaul would do to food costs in the US, and abroad.

 

Anyone have further insight or an opinion on the matter?

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #2 of 8

I can definitely see it increasing food costs on the consumer end.

 

Beyond that, I think if the changes regarding the red tape for small farmers are made as proposed it'll be a good thing for small farms.  In general I don't see it doing much of anything. 

 

My personal opinion is that anything other than a transition from large food processors back to small, local farm production is a small drop in a large problem lake.  I'm not at all sure that the cost to implement the changes will be worth what I perceive will be little change in the overall problem.

I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBazookas View Post

My personal opinion is that anything other than a transition from large food processors back to small, local farm production is a small drop in a large problem lake. 

 

Couldn't have said it better myself.

 

Not only does going back to small local production cut down on huge mega-mistakes, it is also far more economical and far less fuel dependant to do so.  And as a bonus, the quality would be a whole lot better too.

 

Wish Canada could get it's finger out of it's butt on this matter as well.. 

 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 8

The one thing I've learned is that if government is the answer, you ain't asking the right question.

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobblygook View Post

The one thing I've learned is that if government is the answer, you ain't asking the right question.



 Well said. I think it's an interesting debate on what is best for the economy when talking about large conglomerates vs. small local farmers. One thing that I did notice in the legislation is that small farmers would be exempt from many of the provisions, particularly in order to reduce superfluous paperwork. But I think when all is said and done, the biggest thing this legislation will have done is brought together congress and created some bipartisanship.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #6 of 8

As I have been saying  for years the FDA and USDA are worthless. They have no power to close a premise or jail a violator. Start over again with a new super food agency run by food people not by politicians. Don't tell a company you are coming to inspect(which is done now) just show up an inspect.

Maybe the public will find out about a recall before the product reaches them and is consumed. Don't get Senate or House involved. Why ? Because if your large egg producing state has contaminated eggs, they will only stick up for their state giving excuses and deem it as' Oh it was an accident' which is what is done now. And plant still operates as we have all seen about 2 months ago (Wright Egg Producers and Farms) which was never closed and is still filthy as are its affiliates. The Peanut Butter Plant (about 8 months ago)is also still pumping it out to.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

From what I understand (very limited), the USDA has a decent amount of power, at least when it comes to poultry plants. My father used to do a lot of work with them, and I would hear him talk about "51 bird samples" where they would test for salmonella. If the plant failed, they would run another one. If that one failed, the USDA would shut them down and make them call in a cleaning crew to clean the place up. I think the FDA has been concentrating on prescription drugs so much, that it's lost sight of the F in FDA. I think this legislation is supposed to increase the FDA's power to be more of what it should be.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #8 of 8

Your dad used to do. Years ago I worked in fed inspected place, we saw an inspector at least 2 times a year after a few years we saw none. FDA is mostly drug control USDA is mostly food. Today most meat plants are on a so called self inspection. Also their proposed new laws do not pertain to smaller businesses. I say ''"what constitutes smaller business and can't they poison you the same as larger ones.""?


Edited by chefedb - 12/2/10 at 12:39pm

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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