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Nationalistic Herbs - Page 3

post #61 of 67


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

 

Za'taar is also related to them, but is most often translated as hyssop. In the bible, when it talks about the Children of Isreal marking their doors with lamb's blood so the angle of death would pass over them, it says they used hyssop to spread the blood. It was actually za'tarr.

 


I always thought that Zahtar was a mix of spices, much like herbs de provence.  My bottle of Zahtar lists these ingredients:  Hulled sesame seed, Sumac, Thyme, salt, oregano.  I bought it when I was making moroccan flat bread but I don't know what else to use it in.  Can I use it to grill meats?  I'm open to suggestions.

 

Yeah, i thought that too, KKV, i bought it too, and it was a mixture something like that.  Though someone told me where i bought it that everyone makes their own mixture, sort of like curry. 
 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #62 of 67

while we're on herbs (and/or spices, not sure which this belongs to) what is Yeni Bahar and how do you use it.  I went to Turkey recently for a conference and a friend asked me to bring some back for her.  It smelled nice and i bought some for myself too, but how is it used?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #63 of 67
Thread Starter 

Za'taar is the name of both the mixture and the herb. Thyme is often substituted, in the mixture, which always includes sumac and sesame seeds as well. And, sometimes, "thyme" is listed as a mistranslation of za'taar.

 

Sumac is a very popular flavoring agent in the MidEast. It was used greatly in colonial days, in the the U.S., by both natives and settlers, but generally passed out of mind here. Sumac has an astringent, citrusy flavor, and was used for making a lemonade-like drink, back in the day.

 

To try it, mix one cup of berries with a gallon of warm water. Let it steep, strain, and chill (adding sugar if you prefer)

 

I provide those directions because that's how I first learned them, and actually stripped the berries until I had a cup. A great waste of time. So, for Cheftalkers only, 8 heads of berries are comparable to one cup, and make things a heckofalot easier.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #64 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by byrdie View Post

When I was in Korea cilantro was referred to as 'Chinese parsley', and thus I relate to Chinese cooking more than any other.

 

I don't know if it is the most popular herb but I've never used chervil in any other cuisines than French. So that gets my vote.

 

Marijuana is a popular "medicinal" herb in many countries, but we're talking about culinary point of view, aren't we? smile.gif  It's very tough to pick just one herb for each country.

 

I agree that green onion can be counted as an herb for it's frequent use as an herb.


Byrdie - I've always thought that Cilantro was Chinese parsley/coirander also.  I don't know why it is so revered/enjoyed.  To me, it tastes soapy, like Earl Grey tea.  Icky.  If I read a recipe with an ingredient being cilantro, I just leave it out or use spring/green onions if it suits.
 

 

butzy: Good one on the Japanese with Miso.

 

What about Mexican.?


Edited by DC Sunshine - 12/8/10 at 5:29pm
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

while we're on herbs (and/or spices, not sure which this belongs to) what is Yeni Bahar and how do you use it.  I went to Turkey recently for a conference and a friend asked me to bring some back for her.  It smelled nice and i bought some for myself too, but how is it used?



Yeni Bahar; I was intreged, so I looked it up and found this info on a dutch website;

Yeni Bahar is Bay St. Thomas or Pimenta racemosa, close family of the Pimenta dioica, better know as Jamaicapepper or.. allspice.

We use the berries of allspice, but Bay St. Thomas leaves seem also to be used to smoke meat and flavor suasage.

post #66 of 67

I call it L & P sauce. Also marijuana enhances the flavor and aroma and texture  of fresh baked brownies.!

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #67 of 67

I don't know why I just thought of this but...  In Korea, we used to use a lot of plant leaves for flavoring and I'm not sure (again..  maybe they're just vegetables) if I can call them herbs.

We use them a lot especially for wrapping stuff such as bul-go-gi.  Like Japanese shiso leaves, sesame leaves, mustard leaves, and pumpkin leaves. Pumpkin leaves have to be blanched before using but the rest are eaten raw.  Mustard leaves are commonly used when eating duck, sesame leaves with beef, pumpkin leaves with pork.  During the right season, there will be at least half a dozen varieties which you can mix and match.  It's fun.

 

 

 

Quote:
If I read a recipe with an ingredient being cilantro, I just leave it out or use spring/green onions if it suits.

My mom used to do that to me all the time.

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