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Creme Caramel

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

One of my top 5 favorite desserts.  I've made it before with great success but all the recipes I have found and have used call for the creme caramel to be placed into individual ramekins.  I would really like to make a creme caramel dessert inside a bunt mold for presentation.  Is this possible?  My Mom used to make it this way but she hasn't made it in many years and she's not a technique conscious cook, she doesn't know why it worked.  I'm afraid to try it myself for fear of unmoulding the creme caramel into one big gloopy pile of custard.

 

So what do you think, should I just experiment with this?  What kind of bundt mold do you think would be best for this?

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post #2 of 28

I have made creme caramel in a large casserole dish and had it come out, but with that I was able to put a smaller plate against the custard as I unmolded it.  One of my worries would be that with a bundt pan, it has a longer drop to unmold and this could make it come apart,  However, if you filled the pan full, it might be too large for this delicate pastry to hold together.  Do you have something a little more shallow that you could use?

post #3 of 28

Hi KouKouv',

 

When I grew up, the traditional way to bake a flan (flan is French for creme caramel) was in a large dish, "family style". My mother in law also makes her in a large dish. The only time we'd see them baked in individual ramekins were fancy restaurants. I've never seen flan cooked in a bundt pan.

post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 

I'll try to find a shallower bundt mold, one that doesn't have a fancy pattern at the bottom.  I'll experiment for myself and if it all ends up goop I'll stash it in the fridge and eat it all by myself.  Oh boy do I hope it ends up in this disaster scenario! JK

 

FF that's really odd that in france you call it flan.  Flan doesn't sound as french as Creme Caramel to my ears.  How do you even pronounce flan in french lol?

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post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

FF that's really odd that in france you call it flan.  Flan doesn't sound as french as Creme Caramel to my ears.  How do you even pronounce flan in french lol?

 

I think that's the reason it's called Creme Caramel in the U.S. - to make it sound more "authentic" than the real name. There are many examples of that in the American use of French names. For example "fond" in French is actually "sucs". "Entree" in French is actually "Plat principal". Etc...

 

To pronounce flan, think of the vowel you sustain in the middle of the word "yawn". Then pronounce FL (as you would in the beginning of "FLorida" and that vowel, very straight: in French we sustain vowels with a consistent sound, no morphing from one vowel sound to another like in American (i.e. take the word "no": French have a tendency to simply pronounce it "NO": the lips stay firmly in place and the vowel sound is "static"; while Americans actually pronounce it "NO-OOH": the lips close back together as the word ends).
 

post #6 of 28

I always thought an "Entree" was a dish of which the protein was portioned raw, (steak, Schnitzel, Salmon tranche, etc.) as opposed to being portioned after cooking (Prime rib, half a chicken, etc)

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post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

I always thought an "Entree" was a dish of which the protein was portioned raw, (steak, Schnitzel, Salmon tranche, etc.) as opposed to being portioned after cooking (Prime rib, half a chicken, etc)


Hmmm not as far as I know... I mean if I understand correctly then in English, "entree" just means the main course, correct? Then that's what, in France, we call "Plat Principal". Now in French, "entree" means "appetizer", or first course. That's all it means really. So in France a typical meal you eat at home would be composed of:

 

1) Entree (appetizer)

2) Plat principal (entree)

3) Fromage (Cheese platter) or Yogurt

4) Dessert

post #8 of 28

There are a number of dishes that use a similar mixture of eggs and milk/cream to stand on it's own, or, with an extra filling; crème patissière, crème brûlée, quiche, flan, crème caramel...

Flans and quiches are also made as savory dishes, without the sugar of course, but, with an extra filling. I made a nice pumpkin flan not that long ago.

 

You can make a great number of variations on the egg + milk/cream mixture but a ratio of 1 whole egg to 100 ml of milk/cream will do the job, or, 2 eggyolk per 100 ml. The difference? The more cream and eggyolk, the fatter and the more silkier your result will be. The more milk and whole eggs, the more fluffy, somewhat grainier it will be. Also, the amount of eggs can change to make the structure more dense. A mixture of both eggs and eggyolks is best in many cases and certainly in KKV's creme caramel. You also need 20 gram sugar per 100 ml liquid.

 

It's not scientifical, but this is just what I would do if I were you, KKV.

- Be sure your mold is watertight. If not, wrap the whole outide in clingfilm. Also, pour some water in it to measure how much liquid it contains. Also, look for a lower cooking pot or tray in which the mold fits; you gonna need to fill the cooking pot or tray with HOT water, up to halfway the mold. And, also, you gonna need to butter or oil your mold thouroughly, or the filling will never get out.

- Warm the milk with a split vanillabean, marrow scraped out and put in the milk.

- Make the caramel; 100 gram sugar melted into lightbrown caramel, add 2 tbsp of water (carefully not to burn your hands!!) and a good squeeze of lemon juice. Let cool, then pour in the greased mold. You could leave the caramel out for now and pour it over the flan when it comes out of the oven. Your choice.

- Make the custard. Per 200 ml content of the mold; 1 egg + 2 eggyolks. If the mold holds -let's say- 500 ml, use 3 whole eggs and 4 yolks. That will be more than enough egg. I'm counting a little more eggyolk because it's not a small ramekin. More yolk will make it silkier.

Start by beating the eggs and yolks foamy with the sugar, then add the hot milk and whisk.

Put the mold in the cooking pot or tray, but first put a brandnew non-woven synthetic cleaningcloth dubblefolded on the bottom, this will prevent the custard from burning in the oven.

Pour the custard into the mold. Fill the cooking pot or tray halfway the height of the mold with hot water.

Oven 180°C, maybe 40-45 minutes.

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

I've actually never cooked in a water bath.  I simply cover and bake.  Has always worked well, I'm thinking that water baths are a fancy unecessary step.

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post #10 of 28

If eggs + milk,  goes over 1oo C (or whatever the boiling point of water is in F) will have a series of lovely tiny holes all over--like cheese.  As long as the water in your water bath isn't boiling you can be guaranteed that this won't happen

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post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I've actually never cooked in a water bath.  I simply cover and bake.  Has always worked well, I'm thinking that water baths are a fancy unecessary step.



We're probably talking about very different things. Bake covered??? No waterbath?? Ah well, I suppose there are many roads that lead to Rome.

post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 

I guess it's controversial to say so and I don't mean to knock it since I haven't tried it.  But I've always cooked my cheesecake this way, covered and baked with no water bath and have never been disappointed. 

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post #13 of 28

KKV, I made these today, it's been a while since I tried making it, but it's not all that different from my much more preferred crème brûlée. The trick for de-molding is to get some air into the top of the ramekins, after cooling. Cooking it in a waterbath prevents also from sticking to the mold (I guess). I made these with 5 dl milk, 2 whole eggs and 3 eggyolks + sugar (taste the custard for your own dose of sugar!). First made a thick caramel to put in the ramekins before you add the custard; the caramel will be a lot thinner after baking. I have second thoughts about a bigger mold. Too much trouble to be expected and simply because I think these look cute as they are. As you know, they are upside down after de-molding.

All in all, I think crème brûlée is more a health hasard because of the fat, but easier to make. Use 5 dl cream instead of milk and 4 eggyolks + 1 whole egg. Put in shallower but wider containers. Cook in a waterbath (an oentray or a lasagna tray). When cooled, add sugar on top and burn.

 

 

cremeCaramel2.jpgcremeCaramel1.jpg

post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 

Those look adorable Chris but I'm still looking for a shallow bundt mold to test out my recipe with a larger presentation.  I think I prefer creme caramel over creme brulee though that is good as well.  I think I'm going to look online for it.

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post #15 of 28

KK, I don't know if you've seen them, but there are mini-bundt pans available. IIRC, these are about 6 inches in diameter, and might work better for the kind of presentation you're shooting for.

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post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 

I ordered a 10 inch shallow bundt pan today, when that arrives it's ON!

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post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 

Update, I made the creme caramel in a shallow bundt cake mold with a flat top.  I even cooked it in a water bath!  It came out excellent.  The only problem I had was that the flan came out too thin, only about 1inch in height.  I will have to double the recipe next time to get a little taller dessert.  If I do double the recipe does that affect the cooking time or temperature at all?

 

Also I used a real vanilla bean in the custard.  The flavor was fantastic however all the black specks pooled to the bottom of the bundt cake which is the top of the flan.  They weren't speckled throughout the custard.  I think next time I'll use vanilla extract instead.

 

I wish I had taken a picture of it but we dug into it like animals.

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post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
Also I used a real vanilla bean in the custard.  The flavor was fantastic however all the black specks pooled to the bottom of the bundt cake which is the top of the flan.  They weren't speckled throughout the custard.  I think next time I'll use vanilla extract instead.


You won't get the same flavor from vanilla extract. But what you can do is strain the vanilla seeds out before putting the cream in the mold.

post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 

I strained the custard before it went into the mold but I guess my sieve is not fine enough to catch the vanilla specks.  A cheese cloth might take too long.

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post #20 of 28

Save your used vanilla beans, some put them in sugar, others in brandy.  Once used, the seeds are gone, but the flavour is still there, albeit a bit weaker.

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post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks, I keep my used vanilla beans in a jar of sugar.

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post #22 of 28
Quote:

Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post 

 

If I do double the recipe does that affect the cooking time or temperature at all?



Longer time -- probably about 50% longer -- and same temperature.

 

BDL

post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post



Quote:

Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

If I do double the recipe does that affect the cooking time or temperature at all?



Longer time -- probably about 50% longer -- and same temperature.

 

BDL



 Thank BDL and happy new year!

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post #24 of 28

I know this is an old thread but most of the posters are still around.  

 

I have a half gallon of half and half leftover from an event and wondered if it might be too rich to make a creme caramel?  Most recipes I've tried are just whole milk or whole milk with some light cream but not all half and half.  Thoughts?

 

Also, I always make mine in a 6 cup soufflé dish, bake in a water bath, unmolds just fine.  

post #25 of 28

t will be fine with the half and half. in my opinion even better.

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post #26 of 28

I completely concur with berndy. In fact, I don't ever make it without using half-and-half. I make mine in either 4 or 4 ounce ramekins to control the richness by controlling portion sizes.

post #27 of 28
If you don't use a bain Marie you might experience to get bubbles along the outside of your flan.
The water gives you a more gentle heating, but it also depends on the temperature of your oven.
At work with the convection oven I just wrapped the molds in plastic film and cooked it at 90-something Celsius with the steamfunction. Many years ago, though.
post #28 of 28

I follow Peterson's recipe in his book entitled BAKING and use heavy cream for that luxiorious mouthfeel.  The infusion of a Uganda Vanilla Bean (from Beanilla) in the heavy cream complements the overall rich and creamy flavour.

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