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Bone-in Ribeye roast

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I have a 16.5# bone-in ribeye roast from one of our local grass-fed farms.  I would like to serve it for Christmas dinner and was wondering if anyone has their favorite way to prepare it.  I was considering doing it on the grill and was hoping someone out there may have experience with it.  I've ever only roasted them in the oven and am looking for something different.

post #2 of 21
Hello WildIndigo -

I unfortunately can't yet offer any suggestions (other than a mind-numbing list of Googled recipes) for an other-than-oven method of preparing your roast ... because I have never prepared such a large piece of meat.

However ... my goal is to prepare a large bone-in roast for a party of 12-14 (number includes a few kids) in early January (in North Carolina). I see that you are listed in Brevard ... would you mind sharing your beef source?

We would LOVE to be able to deal directly with a local farm that has a grass fed herd!

smile.gif
post #3 of 21

I think you could use the BBQ to put a nice crust on the roast but I think an oven is still the best way to roast something.

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post #4 of 21

    Hi wildindigo, welcome to ChefTalk!

 

 

 

   Is the beef you'll have 100% grass fed? 

 

  dan

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildindigo View Post

I have a 16.5# bone-in ribeye roast from one of our local grass-fed farms.


I hate you. I might change my mind if you invite me over.

Will the roast fit in your grill? Gas or charcoal?

Getting a decent sear on the roast using a hot grill and then finishing in the oven is a good way to go. I've never done more than ones in the 3 - 4 pound range. The searing in the hot grill gives a nice light smokey flavor to the outside, but the lower, more even temp in the oven will get it cooked properly all the way through. I'll suggest minimal, basic seasoning - salt, black pepper and garlic [ powdered, granulated, dried mince, etc. ] With a roast that size you may want to consider cutting it in half. Pull one out of the oven when the internal temp hits 120 F or so, let that rest to give those who want their beef rare a treat. Leave the other until 130 - 135 for those fools who like their beef overcooked - you know, medium, medium rare smile.gif

One aspect of finishing in the oven is you should get some pan juices for sauce or gravy. I'll suggest you serve some yorkshire pudding as a side.

And welcome. This is a great place if you like food.

mjb.
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post #6 of 21

"Danger, Danger Warning Will Robinson....."

 

If you try to cook a prime rib all the way on a grill (gas, wood, or charcoal) you will burn baby burn. Too much fat dripping down will catch on fire.

(ask me why I know????)

Even with indirect heat where you have burners or charcoal heating from the sides, it will still happen. I agree with the idea of starting it on the grill to get a smoky flavor going.

post #7 of 21

I just found this Steve Raichlin recipe for grilling (or actually smoking?) this cut.  Looks interesting, hope it helps.

 

http://www.inc.com/articles/2005/08/primerib.html

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post #8 of 21

With a good cut of beef like this, stick to the tried and true basics. Kosher salt and Fresh pepper, some thyme roasted on a mirepoix 450 for about 25 minutes then down to 350 for the balance. This should produce 16 great cuts . Cook till 120 on probe and let set at least 20 minutes before slicing.Will be pink . Have the rib at room temp when you first put in oven. Make Au Jus from drippings in pan. Serve with Yorkshire pudding and Horseradish Cream. Merry Christmas and Yum Yum

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 

yes, it is...

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by wildindigo View Post

I have a 16.5# bone-in ribeye roast from one of our local grass-fed farms.




I hate you. I might change my mind if you invite me over.

Will the roast fit in your grill? Gas or charcoal?

Getting a decent sear on the roast using a hot grill and then finishing in the oven is a good way to go. I've never done more than ones in the 3 - 4 pound range. The searing in the hot grill gives a nice light smokey flavor to the outside, but the lower, more even temp in the oven will get it cooked properly all the way through. I'll suggest minimal, basic seasoning - salt, black pepper and garlic [ powdered, granulated, dried mince, etc. ] With a roast that size you may want to consider cutting it in half. Pull one out of the oven when the internal temp hits 120 F or so, let that rest to give those who want their beef rare a treat. Leave the other until 130 - 135 for those fools who like their beef overcooked - you know, medium, medium rare smile.gif

One aspect of finishing in the oven is you should get some pan juices for sauce or gravy. I'll suggest you serve some yorkshire pudding as a side.

And welcome. This is a great place if you like food.

mjb.

 


Thanks!  This sounds like a great plan....with 17 guests, I'm sure they'll be some folks who want a variety of temps with this meat. 

 

I'm originally from Utah...just outside SLC.....Utah county.....you could come for dinner but NC is alittle far!

 

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I just found this Steve Raichlin recipe for grilling (or actually smoking?) this cut.  Looks interesting, hope it helps.

 

http://www.inc.com/articles/2005/08/primerib.html


Thanks for the link...this sounds pretty easy....I might try this....

post #12 of 21

If you plan on serving the Prime Rib on the bone, make sure the Chine, feather bones and fat cap are removed. You can tie the bones and fat cap back on for roasting, you can then make a clean cut between the bones for a nice bone in slice of prime Rib. At one time that's all I bought was the 109 prime rib, (That's when the 109 was $1.98 a lb) we would roast the Prime ribs for caterings or restaurant use and have a BBQ rib night later that week. You can also season the prime under the fat cap for extra flavor..................I would figure about 20 minutes per pound in a 375 to 400 degree oven, I would let the rib stand out for a few hours and also roast the meat on a bed of carrots, celery and onions...............The best..............ChefBillyB

post #13 of 21

Grilling would be problematic with all the fat. You'd have to do it indirectly which isn't normally a problem, but it does depend on the size of your roast and the size of your grill.

 

Smoking is  a good way to treat that cut, but again, that requires special equipment.

 

A low oven is the way I generally prepare a prime rib and I've not been disappointed yet.

post #14 of 21

If your grill is large enough, has a cover, and can hold a relatively constant temperature, you can certainly roast in it.  It's something I do fairly frequently and used to do a lot more.  Assuming you have the sort of gas grill most people do, it's very helpufl if it's both large enough and with the burners arranged in such a way that the roast can sit in the chamber without sitting directly over a burner.  You can Micky Mouse that somewhat by using two (to make a double layer) disposable aluminum roasting pans to hold the roast and putting it wherever.  With just about any other cut you'd need to use a rack in the pan as well, but the rib bones are a built in rack. So, there you go.

 

You can, if you like, sear the meat briefly over direct heat, but that's really unnecessary.  In any case, you'll want to go the rest of the way over indirect heat -- hence the need for a large enough grill to get the roast away from the coals.  You'll also probably want to turn the roast a few times during the cook to make sure each side and end is evenly cooked.

 

Depending on whether your grill is gas or charcoal, long or short, and oblong or kettle shaped, there may be a few worthwhile tricks.  Tell me more about your cooker, and I'll tell you more. 

 

No matter what you use, the first rule of long cooks is NO PEEKING.  As the roast cooks it gives off moisture which humidifies the hot air inside the covered grill.  After the air absorbs as much moisture as it can, it stops stripping it from the roast.  But every time you open the grill, the hot, moist air flees and is replaced by cold, dry air (no matter how humid the weather, cool air can't hold as much moisture as hot).  So, no matter how tempting it is to check on the progress, NO PEEKING.

 

Very few grills are supplied with a thermometer which is worth a darn.  I strongly suggest buying a Maverick ET-73 RediChek Remote Smoker Thermometer.  It has two probes, one for chamber temperature, and one for the meat's internal temperature.  It's not cheap at around $40, but if you do much barbecuing it will change your life for the better.  Incredibly worth it.

 

You might want to run a little smoke during the first half or so of your cook.  Consider it a worthwhile option.  Even if you don't use smoke and/or charcoal, your roast will taste wonderfully different than one cooked in an indoor oven.   Speaking of smoke, a dedicated "smoker" is designed to cook indirect at steady temperatures.  If you're thinking about getting one, now might be the time for an early Christmas present.  But please don't buy one without talking to someone who knows the lay of the land as many lower priced smokers -- especially the Brinkmann Gourmet series (aka "ECB," for "el cheapo Brinkmann")  -- can be very difficult to use, especially at first. 

 

There's good advice in this thread about the chine, feather bones and fat cap -- you want to do as much prep as possible before roasting.  As to seasoning, you can use simple salt and pepper, your "usual," or more of a barbecue style dry or wet rub.  Don't worry, you won't have to do any "mopping" (which is what barbecuers call basting). 

 

A simple beef jus is very nice for a sauce, but there are a lot of other possibilities which you may wish to investigate depending on your level of ambition and tolerance for complication.  The one thing I'd stay away from for a rib roast is the sort of tomato based "barbecue sauce" we all associate with barbecue.    

 

Time/temp/lb cooking timetables break down once a roast is longer than it's wide.  In the case of bone-in rib that's usually about 8lbs.  No matter in your case, because you're certainly past it.  Your roast will go somewhat faster than the timetables suggest.  Also, cooking large cuts at lowish temperatures makes prediction even more difficult. 

 

Fortunately, you can hold a cooked standing rib for four hours at serving temperature using nothing more than an insulated chest (a large Igloo will do nicely) some crumpled newspaper and cling wrap.  In fact, the long rest is actually beneficial.  That final flexibility makes the whole process a lot more fun.

 

Feel free to ask lots of questions.  While there are a lot of little things which can make a big difference, they and the whole process are simple enough to nail it on the first time. 

 

BDL 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 12/10/10 at 9:07am
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post #15 of 21

The OP asked for something different than roasting in the oven.  If he/she is willing to experiment who are we to stop him/her?  The expertise on this forum is hands down astounding but let's not get hung up on only one way of doing things. 

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post #16 of 21

Thanks for the no peeking tip BDL.

 

Never cooked such a large bone in rib joint. It's going to look magnificent when you bring it to table.

 

The way I do my rib roast is a little different with lots of flavour...BTW I only know how to oven roast so no help there, sorry.

 

7lb joint

 

Firstly i mix english mustard powder with flour  1:1 and salt and pepper.

 

Then I cut out as much of the middle blob of fat as i can and cover the whole joint with the mustard mix, including the hole i made.

 

Then I brown it gently...I dont want too much searing.

 

I then insert a whole leek in the hole and push the fat back in there too.

 

the meat is then put on a trivet of the end bones (My butcher cuts them off for me close to the meat) whole seared onions and unpeeled organic carrots. A glass of red wine and lots of thyme

 

I make a tent with foil to make an oven within the oven (it mustnt touch the meat)

 

Then Iblast it at 450 for 20 mins and down to 180 for 11/2 hours for rare-ish or 120 on the thermometer.

 

The last 30 mins i take the foil off. then straight back on again while resting.

 

Having a hole in the middle doesnt seem to make much difference to presentation and the veg all tastes amazing. What I dont munch as chefs perks gets mouli'd into the gravy

 

Ps I wouldnt be experimenting this time around.You just paid megabucks for a prime peice of meat that, roasted beautifully, will impress the pantsoff your guests. I hope your meal is a triumph.

 

PPs  This is, as far as I know, my own recipe

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post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildindigo View Post

yes, it is...



   Hi WildIndigo,

 

    If it's all grass fed you'll still be fine with a variety of heat sources, but you will want to be aware of your temp and heat source.  Without the extra fat you'll have less leeway, just be aware of your target temperature when cooking and the rise during a good rest. 

 

   sounds delicious!

  dan

post #18 of 21

 I have been cutting meat for over 40 years and could not tell you what it is fed by looking at the cut. In addition most recipes dont give a hoot if its grass or grain feds, and since most people don't know how it's fed. Just cook it in the normal recommended way.  Lets not make this more complicated then it is.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #19 of 21

      I didn't mean to confuse you.  I'm also not surprised that you have never tasted or cut 100% grass fed beef, it's not that common to find in the U.S. anymore.  You should give it a try sometime if you're given the chance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   dan

post #20 of 21

For a Christmas dinner I would not try to do something new ! You better stick with  what you are used to doing to make sure everything turns out fine.You only have one roast.therefore you can't risk to mess up otherwise you might have to eat pankakes for Christmas or leftover pizza

post #21 of 21

I live on the edge, and I very often make something new for holidays or dinner parties.  I'll be honest, sometimes it works and sometimes it could go better.  But it's fun to try.  What's worse than serving the same thing over and over again just because it's safe?  A cut like rib roast is very forgiving, you just have to make sure it's not overcooked and that's basically it.  And even if it does overcook a little bit the meat is so tasty and tender that it's definitely edible and enjoyable.  Think about it, how often do you come across a cut like this?  It's not like you can buy one on a random tuesday and just experiment by yourself, who can afford that???  We've been planning on doing a whole pig roast when the weather gets nice.  Does that mean that I have to roast a whole pig by myself just to experiment first?  Nope, everybody will be there to join in on the festivities eventhough the pig might be terrible. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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