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Wine bread won't rise

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

My wine bread wont rise.

 

1.5C wine, 0.5C water, 4+ cups flour.

 

I leave it sit 2 hours and it only rises very little.

 

In the oven it does rise a little more though.

 

Any ideas?

post #2 of 13

What's your leavening agent?  If it's yeast, the alcohol in the wine will inhibit growth.  You might need a higher concentration of yeast to counteract the inhibitor.  If it's not warm enough, it won't proof properly either. 

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yes, its yeast, how much yeast should I use?  2-3 packets?

post #4 of 13

Abe, what bread is this?  I never heard of wine bread. 

In terms of yeast, the more yeast you use, the less interesting the bread will taste.  More yeast means faster rise and less flavor development.

 

Like with children, you have to let them grow at their own pace, and not push them to grow too soon,  In fact, that is a good rule with everything, from businesses to economies to fruit (notice those gigantic and tasteless engineered fruits and vegetables you see sometimes? Not to mention the economic crises that keep happening when people begin to think let's grow faster, lets get richer, quicker, then boom!  And how many restaurants have you seen with a line in front of them, which then expanded and are now empty?).  Everyone should make bread!

 

Anyway, more than a package of yeast for two loaves is too much. 

If you're willing to make a dough rise overnight, you need less yeast (1/4 tsp even, if there are no ingredients that hamper the yeast development - i don;t know about alcohol, but you could cook the wine first to eliminate some of that) and the flavor will be all the better for it, as its keeping powers. 

 

If you're using active dry yeast, it may not be active any more - sprinkle a bit in a little warm water, stir with a pinch of sugar and see if it bubbles up.  If not, it's dead.  If it;s fresh yeast it could be dead.  (some stores used to keep it in the freezer here, and i found it never worked well any more). 

 

How much yeast does your recipe call for? 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 13

Abe, all else aside, that's an awfully slack dough. I make it about 88% hydration---which is pretty close to being more of a batter than a dough.

 

Are you sure those measurements are correct?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 13

Above answer is correct. Alcohol content is either retarding or killing yeast. You sure come on here with some wild ideas and things. You could put 20 packs of yeast , still may not work. This mixture can't taste good.  

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yes, its been 4-5 cups dough, I add more as I go.

post #8 of 13

Another alternative would be to cook off some of the alcohol before you add the booze in question to the mixture.  I make beer bread in that manner.  Wine generally has a much higher alcohol content than beer, so it would need to be cooked longer (or at a higher temperature) to evaporate more of the alcohol than with beer.  It's not necessary to evaporate all of the alcohol, but I think that if you cook it down to about 4 or 5% alcohol content, typical bread making yeast will be able to thrive.  If you can find compressed yeast cakes instead of the powdered active dry yeast, that may help as well, since it is generally more lively. 

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by iplaywithfire View Post

Another alternative would be to cook off some of the alcohol before you add the booze in question to the mixture.  I make beer bread in that manner.  Wine generally has a much higher alcohol content than beer, so it would need to be cooked longer (or at a higher temperature) to evaporate more of the alcohol than with beer.  It's not necessary to evaporate all of the alcohol, but I think that if you cook it down to about 4 or 5% alcohol content, typical bread making yeast will be able to thrive.  If you can find compressed yeast cakes instead of the powdered active dry yeast, that may help as well, since it is generally more lively. 



hmm, i'm thinking of that yeast being much more lively with all that beer..

. drinkbeer.gifrollsmile.gif   bounce.gif

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iplaywithfire View Post

Another alternative would be to cook off some of the alcohol before you add the booze in question to the mixture.  I make beer bread in that manner.  Wine generally has a much higher alcohol content than beer, so it would need to be cooked longer (or at a higher temperature) to evaporate more of the alcohol than with beer.  It's not necessary to evaporate all of the alcohol, but I think that if you cook it down to about 4 or 5% alcohol content, typical bread making yeast will be able to thrive.  If you can find compressed yeast cakes instead of the powdered active dry yeast, that may help as well, since it is generally more lively. 



That's what I was thinkging, reduce the wine, then add it.

post #11 of 13

Drink the wine and eat the bread, same as putting wine in bread. Much less complicated.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 13

I'd be curious, Abe, just how it tastes.  It doesn't sound very appealing. 

did you get my recipe for rolls, by the way?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #13 of 13

Re: the alcohol...    Alcohol prevents development of gluten.  This is the reason that vodka is often used in pie crust, to provide a liquid that won't promote gluten development like water does, thereby making the crust more tender.  You need gluten in the bread, though.

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