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City "chicken"

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm sure most of you are familiar, it's not really chicken at all. It's breaded skewers of pork and veal. I've accepted the task of making these for Christmas dinner. I want them to be distinctly different, but they need to be very tender. Anyone who's had it will tell you that tough, chewy city chicken is no fun. What comes to my mind, is a slow braised short-rib of both veal and pork, cut from the bone and then skewered. I worry though that will be a little difficult to skewer. and then i've considered the fact that I'd then be breading cooked meat, and then take them to Christmas dinner to be reheated. Two steps I'm worried will dry them out. Suggestions please?

post #2 of 12

Funny, I never heard the term City Chicken??? I have heard Country Fried.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Funny, I never heard the term City Chicken??? I have heard Country Fried.



No sir. completely different dish

post #4 of 12
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

indeed. but like i said it's easy to make these things kinda chewy and not so good to eat. so i want to make these as tender as possible.

post #6 of 12

Yoghurt or buttermilk marinade will tenderize the meat and if you use thick yoghurt under the breading it will make it unnecessary to marinate it at all. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

a buttermilk marinade sounds good, i was thinking of marinating to get a nice mild onion flavor to it anyways.

post #8 of 12

If breading it, then you can grate an onion into the thick yoghurt you use under the breading and give an onion flavor like that. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #9 of 12

City Chicken (a/k/a Mock Chicken Legs) in my area (midwestern US) are made of ground pork and maybe veal. I rarely find them in a store that doesn't cut its own meat, leading me to think they're made of ground scraps. The butchers mix them with unknown "spices" and coat them with crushed corn flakes. I almost bought them one time until I found out they used bits of "pumped" pork in the mix. I didn't know that the time I bought them (once) that they included that drek, but after the first bite, and upon discovering them far too salty to eat, I threw them out.

 

I hope you have better luck than I've had!

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post #10 of 12

Completely by chance, my local paper (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) ran a piece on mock chicken legs by Sanford D'Amato. Chef D'Amato is a Beard Award Winner and is the chef-owner of Sanford Restaurant in Milwaukee.

http://www.jsonline.com/features/food/111821444.html

 

(By the way, Nicko and his wife, Colleen, and I with my husband, have enjoyed Chef D'Amato's dishes at Coquette Cafe in Milwaukee, which he has since sold to some of his former employees.)

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post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

wow on rosemary springs. what an interesting idea

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post

wow on rosemary springs. what an interesting idea


used to do it with grilled shrimp at a country club I worked at. trick is to remove the leaves and actually use the stem as a skewer leave a nice inch or two of rosemary leaves at the top for a bit of flair.  trying to use the leaves and stems usually tore shrimp too much.

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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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