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Forme of Cury

post #1 of 6
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This compilation of recipes is supposed to have been put together by the chief master cooks of King Richard II.


I am trying to find out as much imformation on this manuscript as possible.

Has anyone come across the works of Constance Hiett and Sharon Butler? I am told that they have put together a very detailed book of Anglo-Norman cuisine.

I want to try to mondernise some of these recipes, but I think I need a glossery to help reference these ingredients.

I've come across Pegge and Warner in my library.
Still looking for more detail though.

Has anyone run across any references to this cuisine while studying medevil cooking?

TIA
cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #2 of 6
I have to hit the library this week, CC and I'll check for you.
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post #3 of 6
there are two books that you are looking for in bookfinder.com
good luck with you research.
post #4 of 6
CC, there are a number of medieval websites, some of which have links to food and cooking of the time. You might try those. Also have you checked out the culinary timelines here or here
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #5 of 6
You can see picture views of the pages from THE FORME OF CURY at this webpage:

Forme of Cury
“Britain is the only country in the world where the food is more dangerous than the sex.” - Jackie Mason
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“Britain is the only country in the world where the food is more dangerous than the sex.” - Jackie Mason
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post #6 of 6
I was given the book The Forme of Cury many years ago because of my dual interests in food and middle ages, and tried a couple of things from there but it's not a very user-friendly book i found. I also have another book by three french historians which i have in italian but may be translated also into english. The original french title is La Gastronomie nel Moyen Age - 150 Recettes de France et d'Italie by Redon, Sabban and Serventi. It's got an introduction by Georges Duby, the french historian who is associated with the new current of History of Everyday Life among historians. (They emphasize how people lived rather than what king was killing what other king).

Of the two, the french one is certainly better researched, using more modern methods and knowledge of what was available then (my edition, anyway, of the Forme of Cury, is from the 70s.) (I just happened to meet a guy who is a professor of history and a researcher into ancient foods - he was explaining that now they can chemically analyse the scrapings from the insides of old pottery to know about the chemical compositions of the foods that were contained in them.)

The historians who did the french book are very good cooks too, so they really have adapted their recipes to modern ingredients, but put in the original recipe in medieval french or italian, and then the translation into modern language, and then the adaptation using their understanding of the techniques of the times and the ingredients. I believe there is one or two recipes from england too.
I made quite a few of these. I imagine that norman cooking, that was brought over to england in 1066, would have been derived from or influenced by much of the northern french stuff in this book. And even in the 1200s, the Normans maintained their close contact with Normandy where they all had castles and lands, and the economy of the middle ages required that lords and their huge retinues of knights and hangers-on had to go around and consume the produce on the spot, so they were always on the move. So i imagine they ate much like their norman cousins.

Oh, and the book debunks the theory that marco polo brought pasta from china. Like all simple staple foods made from flour and water (bread, pita/pizza, pasta, couscous, polentas) they are ubiquitous. There's a recipe for "lasagne" which are large squares of pasta, boiled and seasoned with cheese that were eaten with toothpicks. (No tomatoes yet, of course, nor potatoes, and alot of other things back then before the discovery of the New World.)

In fact, italians, who were considered really overly refined asnd foppish in the middle ages because, among other things, they carried their fork with them when everyone else ate with their hands, probably did this because it's very uncomfortable to eat pasta with the hands.
But anyway, the recipe for pasta pre-dates marco polo.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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