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checking someone's math......

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

OK so I'm trying to see if my #'s are right or is my co-worker correct........here ya go....

 

 

we have a party of 40ppl they arrive at 6 for apps and cocktails. Dinner stars at 7. We have 3 passed apps for the 1 hour time, then a 3 course meal, Ceaser salad, steak and scampi combo plate and creme brulee for dessert

 

 the apps are- 1 Curry cream cheese on a rice cracker with a poached prawn

                     2 mini filo tarts with roasted galic, oven dried grape tom's and chev

                     3 greek bay shrimp salad in an endive leaf

 

the question is ......how many of each apps would you make and how did you come to your conclusion????

 

I'll post later what my thought were and what my co-worker had in mind...

 

fryguy


Edited by fryguy - 12/14/10 at 4:09pm
post #2 of 19

You really want to pass #3?  If you have two servers I'd say about three each.

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

so 3 per person of each app is 360 pcs for 1 hour ......hmmm

post #4 of 19

Look, are you trying to "feed them" in the first hour?? Three of each is nine per person or one every 6 2/3 minutes! Great for cocktails ONLY, but not followed by a dinner!

 

 

As I read your menu, all three appetizers are more than a single bite. If so, I'd cut it back to one of each, i.e. 3 pieces per person, passed at 6:10, 6:25, and 6:40. So, 40 of each appetizer for a total of 120.

 

If they truly are "one bite", I might consider doubling the quantity and the passing, but remember, you still are serving dinner!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 19

For passed apps, I've always gone by 2 1/2 total pcs per person. In most places I've worked, shrimp is popular, so I would up my count to 3 per. In this case, that would mean 40 pieces of each app. Then, I'd add a cushion of 10-20 pieces. In other words, there's no set equation. If you know your guests likes and dislikes, use that information to help you.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #6 of 19

I'd like to make an observation also........

What you are passing are Hors d Oeuvres NOT appetizers.

The Caesar salad is the appetizer.

 

Most of the time the amount of hors d oeuvres are based on time. So many per person per hour. If it was a cocktail party and all there was were hors then you'd figure differently. For your situation 3 per person should be adequate for the hour.

 

post #7 of 19

On an upscale Gig, I figure 3 per person per hour. On lower class I figure 4 or 5. Logic !  The lower class do not care what others think about them cramming their faces. Upper class in particular woman, always watching weigh and are self conciece as to how others view them.. This  logic has worked for me over the years

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 19

I concur with Chef Ross

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 19

Stand alone reception, no dinner: 6 pc per person.

 

Reception before dinner? 3 per person.

post #10 of 19

1 1/2 to 2 pcs per person, I can't see having 9 pcs per person, 6 may even be to many. People will be arriving between 6 and 7, I figure all the people will be there by 6:30 get a drink, a bite or two and ready do dinner........1 1/2 would be spot on IMHO.....................ChefBillyB

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

My # was 1.5 of each app per person for a total of 180 pcs. It's a little heavy but we are a country club and it has been said that we are not to run out of anything .....my co-worker had the # at 100 per app for a total of 300.......300 pcs. for 40 people wow......this is our busy season and that seem to be a waste of time, effort and food cost. I would think that would be a basic chef 101 calculation....oh the co-worker was the chef. Not to say anything bad about him beacause he is a great guy but sometimes I have to just shake my head and say wtf


Edited by fryguy - 12/16/10 at 10:12am
post #12 of 19

They care about food cost at a country club?  Is this members only or an outside party?

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

They care about food cost at a country club?  Is this members only or an outside party?



I used to work at a country club, and I can't speak for others but we definitely cared about food cost. Factoring in the fixed overhead and labour cost of maintaining the golf course itself, food cost is one of the few areas that can be reduced and controlled effectively.

 

As for the canapes, I'd guestimate around 1.5-2 per person.

post #14 of 19

Seeing the variety of answers out there is why, at most resorts and catering companies I worked for, we sold Hors by the piece or by the dozen.  It was the salesperson's job to work with the client on how many to serve.  There are just too many variables for there to be hard and fast rules.  Hors only?  Dinner afterwards?  Plated dinner?  Buffet dinner?  Alcohol served?  Time of day?  Type of function?  Type of clientele?  How long?  Geographic location?  How many varieties served?  Passed, set or a mix?

 

For your particular case, and knowing that the client doesn't want to run out, I would probably figure on 1 1/2 pieces per Hors, per person.  That would be 4 1/2 pieces per person.  Probably a little on the high side.

post #15 of 19

If you REALLY want some control over the amount of hors d'oeuvre consumed, stick with passing them, now you do have some control, not only as to when they are available, but also the social pressure not to be too greedy!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #16 of 19

I'd go 4 dozen of each. Seems about right. Enough to stimulate without feeding.

 

We have a sales dpt that sells certain amt of appy's etc. all neatly laid out for us on a banquet sheet. Makes it a little easier to keep food cost in check when you've got a drop dead number 72hrs in advance.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

They care about food cost at a country club?  Is this members only or an outside party?



 

post #18 of 19

I'd go with 60 of each app personally. 1 per person is definitely too few, I imagine people mingling and servers walking around handing things out, maybe setting them down after a bit for people to grab and munch on. Some people will grab 2, some people will grab none, others may come and try and get a third. 2 of each app per person is definitely too much and you'd fill them by the ceasar. Maybe 70 of each app, or 1.75/per person. I'd say its more okay to barely run out than have far too much.

post #19 of 19

Pete is only touching the surface of questions. What gender is the group? If mixed, more men than women, women than men or equal? Are they dining formally or casually?  Coming of the golf course or arriving dressed for dinner?

Best bet is to get them to by set amounts, by the dozen. Generally I go with the 3-4 pieces per person, per hour with the extra piece being the shrimp.

Also, have somebody play traffic cop with the tray service. The banquet captian should be on top of how much is served vs. how full the room is and work with the kitchen on timing. I have sometimes pulled the servers for 10 minutes when some early arrivals threatened to wipe us out, then rationed the remainder to make until the end of cocktail hour.

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