or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Dry Apple Cider in United States
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dry Apple Cider in United States

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I am currently having trouble finding a product needed for a gravy recipe.

 

The recipe is calling for a Dry Apple Cider.  I am unable to locate this product anywhere near the Charlotte, NC area.  Does anyone have any ideas on if there is a substitute or what I can use?  Regular apple cider would be too sweet and I don't think apple cider vinegar would be a good substitute although I could be mistaken.

 

In the UK it is referred to as Dry Blackthorn Cider or Strongbow possibly.

 

Thank you!

post #2 of 21

It's kinda hard to find, but when they have it it's generally sold alongside with beer. In fact sometimes all they'll have is a 6-pack, so it's packaged just like beer.

 

Maybe substitute with a beer that does not have a strong taste of its own, and add tiny bit of apple cider vinegar if you need more acidity. 

post #3 of 21

Cider in British parlance is an alcoholic apple drink.  I think it's called 'hard cider' in the USA.

Don't use apple cider vinegar.... blech!

 

Blackthorn and Strongbow are fairly bog-standard, mass produced English ciders.

post #4 of 21

Wyders would be the one to look for. They make a peach a pear and an apple cider here in the states. The pear is fantastic.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the replies. I am not having any luck finding the Wyder's here in Charlotte.  :(   Maybe it is because we are in the south.  :)

 

What about French Fries idea but instead of using the cider vinegar perhaps a real cider instead?   I wonder what kind of ratio I should do with this.  The recipe calls for 2 cups of the dry apple cider.

 

Maybe a very mild beer such as a coors light or watery beer 1 1/2 cups and 1/2 cup of apple cider?  I am totally shooting in the dark here and really hope this doesn't ruin the entire recipe. 

post #6 of 21

What are you intending to serve with this gravy?

 

I only use English cider when I'm cooking pork.

post #7 of 21

I would probably not use 1/2 cup of apple cider, that's a LOT of acid. If what you call "real cider" is the American carbonated apple juice, I wouldn't use that or very little because it's going to bring a lot of sweetness. Maybe if you want to share the whole recipe with us we can give you more useful suggestions?

 

Personally I'd just use beer, and taste to see if something's missing. You can play with the acidity and the sweetness with the vinegar and "real cider".

 

post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 

It is going to be served with turkey.  It is pretty much the stuffings from the bird after cooking... roasted together (chopped) in roasting pan...2 roasted onions, a roasted lemon, 2 tomatoes, cooked bacon, sprig of rosemary, the 2 turkey wings from bird all seared together, then i will add the chicken stock (1 cup), turkey drippings from letting it sit, and the 2 cups of dry apple cider.   Reduce, strain, and serve.

post #9 of 21

I don't suppose you have a BevMo! in your area do you? they almost always have it. After doing a bit of a search a place called total wines in charlotte is supposed to have a hard cider called Original Sin. best of luck

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

I don't suppose you have a BevMo! in your area do you? they almost always have it. After doing a bit of a search a place called total wines in charlotte is supposed to have a hard cider called Original Sin. best of luck



... or Trader Joes.

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 

No bevmo, and I saw that they had it...they would not ship it to me though :(   However, you are excellent!  The total wines in charlotte does have a hard cider in stock.  They are very close to me and I will be going by there tomorrow to pick some up.  I am not sure if they have the apple version but they do have some things that are very similar and much better than trying a beer substitute from what the lady  explained to me on the phone.  I do not know how I couldn't find that store...thank you again.  It is very appreciated!  Hopefully it will work for me.  If they don't have an apple, I will have to find a way to get the apple flavor.  Maybe I will simply roast up a small piece of apple in the mix and that should do it.

 

Thank you to all for the advice and comments.  As mentioned they are very appreciated.

 

post #12 of 21

I was going to suggest roasting an apple, yes. Best way to get the apple flavor in your stuffing!

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

I don't suppose you have a BevMo! in your area do you? they almost always have it. After doing a bit of a search a place called total wines in charlotte is supposed to have a hard cider called Original Sin. best of luck



... or Trader Joes.

 

 

We do have trader joes....i didn't see anything there that could help me though.  Maybe I am looking in the wrong area.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

I was going to suggest roasting an apple, yes. Best way to get the apple flavor in your stuffing!

Good suggestion - that's what I did for Thanksgiving and it worked quite well.

 

 Alternatively, since this appears to be for a sauce: pan-fry apple (Granny Smith) in butter until soft and wiz them in a blender.  Add to the sauce.

post #15 of 21

Or perhaps a combo of a whole apple and a tablespoon or three of Calvados?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #16 of 21

Ishbel, funny you should mention Blackthorn.  It was the very first thing that came to mind when reading this post.  To the OP, I'm surprised you are having that much trouble finding hard cider.  It seems that most places I've lived in the last 10 years you can find at least one brand at any half way decent liquor store.

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Or perhaps a combo of a whole apple and a tablespoon or three of Calvados?



That actually sounds quite tasty. But is it any easier to find Calvados in the U.S. than hard cider? That's the question. If you find it, buy it, drink it, pour it on crepes, use it in sauces for pork etc... you won't regret it.

post #18 of 21

I can get Calvados even here in central Kentucky, FF. And if it's available here, it ain't hard to get. Trust me.

 

It's not cheap, of course. But the good stuff never is.

 

Another alternative would be apple jack. Not as smooth on the tongue as the Normandy stuff, but for cooking, why not? Probably a little cheaper (I'm guessing. Last Jack I had was homemade) too.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #19 of 21

You might try Woodchuck cider. It's got a clear, bright flavor and I know it's available in NC.

(Fond memories of getting hammered with Woodchuck while boating on Lake Norman.)

It might not be as dry as you'd like but for what you doing with it, it would be considerably drier than using apple liqueurs.

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post

... To the OP, I'm surprised you are having that much trouble finding hard cider.  It seems that most places I've lived in the last 10 years you can find at least one brand at any half way decent liquor store.



I'm surprised and not surprised all at the same time.  I've seen cider EVERYWHERE... until I decide I want to buy some to drink.

 

Other products that one would think not difficult to find can be quite challenging.  Just yesterday I asked my wife to pick me up a bottle of Vin Santo at the Italian deli while she was getting me a sandwich.  Their reaction:  they've never heard of a wine called Vin Santo.  Go figure.

post #21 of 21

The regular "Woodchuck" cider can be on the sweet side, but if you can find their granny smith apple cider that one tends to be a little drier and more tart.

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Dry Apple Cider in United States