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Suggestions on a Risotto Recipe

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone!  I just joined the forums and need some advice for a dish I'm working on.  I've just started cooking Risottos and wanted to do something pairing up Guatemalan Spanish with it.  It'll basically be a Black Bean Risotto with Plantains.

 

I'll be using Yellow onions instead of shallots which I usually see for Italian Risotto.  I was thinking of maybe using a sweeter Red Wine to start off with and then use the Black Bean broth to cook the rice with.  

 

Usually sour cream is added to the Black Beans and it doesn't split but I'm concerned about this happening if I add it as part of the end of the cooking process.  I also want to use a saltier cheese that's not Parmesan.  Mozzerella is also too bland for it I think.  Any suggestions?

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post #2 of 21

As long as you stir the sour cream in when it's off the heat, or the heat is reduced, you should be fine. As far as parmesan substitutes, is there a reason you don't want to use parmesan? Or are you interested in something else for the sake of it being different?

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hey.  Thanks for the sour cream suggestions.  I'm going to try just serving it on the side and having each person serve themselves and mix it.  For the cheese, I wanted to use something salty but not as much as Parmesan tends to be.  If I could stick with a spanish style cheese that would be cool as far as sticking with the theme.  Thanks again!  Can't wait to try it.

post #4 of 21

I doubt you'll have any problems with the cream. A lot of chefs add cream at the end of a risotto.

 

As for cheese, you could maybe use Pecorino Romano: it's a sheep cheese and has a stlightly stronger, saltier, almost tickling flavor when compared with Parmesan. Or, if you really want something spanish, you could find a nice Manchego cheese, or some other sheep Spanish cheese. I agree with Mozarella being a bad choice, it would probably ruin the texture of your risotto and turn it into a gooey rubbery mess.

 

As for using red wine... with cream at the end... and the black bean broth... the only concern I would have is not flavor, but color. I'm afraid the dish would end up some kind of gray brownish... may not be really appetizing. But it's something you could try, of course.

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

I think you might be right about the wine.  I think I'll just go with the Bean broth without it.  I'll look for the cheeses you suggested.  Does the Manchego cheese melt?  I'll probably have to go to a Whole Foods.  They're the only place I could think of that has a big cheese selection

post #6 of 21

Yes, Manchego does melt. Did you want less salty than parmesan? If yes Manchego may be a good choice. I thought you said you wanted something saltier than parmesan, which is why I thought of Pecorino Romano. That, and also because I just love that cheese. smile.gif

post #7 of 21

Manchego is a great recommendation. I'm also a fan of something called reggianito, which is basically parmesan cheese made in Argentina. If you wanted something that will melt better, go for gruyere, which is perhaps my favorite cheese on earth. However, I think melted cheese in the risotto might make it gooey.  

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 

Yeah, something just a little less salty would be better for this I think.  I like gruyere cheese too.  It's just too bad cheese can get so pricey or I'd be at Whole Foods a lot more often.

post #9 of 21

Black bean broth, gruyere, red wine.... this does not sound very appetizing at all.  Try using a dry vermouth for wine, it doesn't lend a strong flavor or mess up the color.  Gruyere will take over the entire dish making it as unguatemalan as can possibly be.  Manchego is a wonderful cheese substitute for parmesan, or I like the idea of an aged asiago too.  I see where you're going with this, a sort of risotto take on black beans and rice.  It's creative and worth a shot.  Instead of stirring in the sour cream why not place a dollop on top of each serving?  I thinnk it will look beautiful against the dark risotto, with a beautiful sprinkling of cilantro on top.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 21

I strongly support all your suggestions KKV! Personally I would even let the cheese out this time... don't know about the cheese/bean combo. Oh, and no beanbroth, chickenstock would be my choice.

post #11 of 21

I think you're spot on, on all points, Koukouvagia.

 

For risotto you want a hard, grating cheese; one that sort of melds with the other ingredients, rather than melting into a gooey puddle---which gruyere and manchago will do. Asiago makes a lot of sense; more so even than the romano, although that's a good choice too. Another possibility, Grana Padano, which would be my first step away from parmesan, with asiago the step after that.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 21



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post

I strongly support all your suggestions KKV!

 

Once in a while I do make sense! smile.gif

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post #13 of 21



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

I think you're spot on, on all points, Koukouvagia.

 

 

Do go on!

 

I have a confession to make.  I always believed that grana padana was parmiggiano. 

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post #14 of 21

The next best thing, KK. In fact, many people think of Grana Padano as "the cheaper Reggiano." And certainly they can be used interchageably.

 

Keep in mind, however, that they both carry PDO classification.

 

Both date from the 12th century, and are made similarly, using cows milk. I would say the Grana Padano is a bit more brittle, and has more of a fruit taste than the Parmesan. Also a little less salty tasting, perhaps? Generally speaking, it's aged about twice as long as Parmesan.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #15 of 21

I once read that grana has formaldehyde in it.  That seems ridiculous, but i think it was from a reputable source.  Could it be?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #16 of 21

If so, Siduri, I'm unaware of it. Might have been a case where there was some adultrated cheeses floating around? One of those scandals that periodically rock the Italian food world?

 

Even so, I would think it hard to miss the smell of formaldehyde.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.  It really helped and I'm looking forward to talking to everyone on here.  I did end up getting the Manchego cheese from Whole Foods and it melted nicely in the dish.  I even sprinkled some on top with a dollop of sour cream as Koukouvagia suggested.  I meant to take a picture so all of you could at least see the final product but I was caught up in getting it served before it got cold.  All in all it wasn't a bad first try.  I felt like it was lacking something though.  Beans in itself can be pretty bland and I ended up having to used canned black beans because of time constraints.  I don't know if that would make a huge difference.  Thanks again everyone!

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

If so, Siduri, I'm unaware of it. Might have been a case where there was some adultrated cheeses floating around? One of those scandals that periodically rock the Italian food world?

 

Even so, I would think it hard to miss the smell of formaldehyde.

 

Ok, ky, i looked it up.  It seems they used it to cut down the bacteria, and since 1991 or 1993 (depending on the source) turned to lisozyme (translating liberally from lisozima).  The cows in the padana area are fed with silage, which apparently gives them more bacteria in the milk, while those in Parma and Reggio Emilia are not fed silage. 

I do remember i didn;t opt for the grana when the kids were growing up for this reason, despite that it costs much less than parmigiano. 
 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

 

Both date from the 12th century, and are made similarly, using cows milk. I would say the Grana Padano is a bit more brittle, and has more of a fruit taste than the Parmesan. Also a little less salty tasting, perhaps? Generally speaking, it's aged about twice as long as Parmesan.


No, that's half as long as Parmesan. Parmesan is 2 years, grana Padano only 1 generally, though there are older versions around too.

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #20 of 21

I'm sure the Manchego was very nice.  However as a general rule, Cotijo is the best choice as the Hispanic Parmaggiano substitute. 

 

BDL

post #21 of 21

Good catch, Phil. I mentally reversed those, for some reason---likely terminal exhaustion (there's a reason it's called the graveyard shift. It'll kill ya, sure as shootin')).

 

Grana Padano, according to The World Cheese Book, is aged 1-2 years. Parmigiano-Reggiano is aged up to 36 months.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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