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Smoking bacon at home - Page 3

post #61 of 66

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Yes.  Our cold smoker is a very large, covered grill, with a smoke generator attached.  With the generator going full blast (depending on ambient temperatures) I can keep the chamber temperature in the seventies or below; but because of our location chamber temps usually run into the nineties.

 

As a very general rule, colder temps and longer smoke exposure are better.  But you can only do what you can do; and, of course, it's a mistake to allow perfect to be the enemy of good.  Just as with hot-smoking, many fine points are very equipment dependent, especially when it comes to time, temp, fire management, and so on.  The bright side is that the "gross points" are not.  As long as you can keep your temps below around 120F, you can cold smoke. 

 

I'll be happy to help you in any way I can. 

 

BDL

BDL, thx for your reply, I hope all is well in your neck of the woods. I know Low & Slow is the rule, you just reaffirmed that. I think I better get moving if I plan on doing any kind of cold smoking. I want to smoke a 16 to 18lb ham, I may saw it in half to cut the smoking time. Should I figure about one hr to the lb ???? .........The area I had planned for the stove and meat box has southern exposure, it gets real hot. My idea is to us the old cast iron stove for the fire/smoke and then send the smoke by way of Metal flex tube, to a metal garbage can where the meat will hang. If it's still cool enough in April, I could start it in the evening and smoke it all night during cooler temps..........let me know your ideas........I'm on a mission tomorrow to make some sausage and Carnitas out of this portion................Thx.......Bill

post #62 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

This thread is making me salivate!! smile.gif A whole world of cooking I know absolutely nothing about...!! eek.gif


FF: Charcuterie is enjoying a renaissance here in the U.S., especially, it seems in both the northeast and California.  (pls forgive if I omitted some other american locale 8))

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #63 of 66

The worry I have with using an old wood stove is the creosote buildup on the interior.  Best remove.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #64 of 66

ChefBilly all your pictures are amazing!

 

I was looking at building a cold smoker for my new commercial kitchen, but we ended up splurging on a huge smoker that can cold smoke as well so I don't need to build one now.

 

The plan was to buy a used commercial fridge and convert it for cold smoking.  Evacuator fan on top, separate smoke box connected through a tube to the fridge, putting the fridge on a stand to keep it above the smoke box.  The fridge seemed ideal due to being able to rack up the inside, as well as being relatively easy to clean.  Plus, as we weren't certain as to ambient temp where we were going to keep it, could always turn the fridge on for a little bit before smoking to regulate the temp if it was sitting too hot.  The work was a little behind my capabilities, but I have a machinist friend who could've done this quite easily.  All in all we were estimating about $1000 to do this, considering a used fridge goes for around $500 here.

 

Still, we are looking at cold smoking ribeye and strip steaks for about 45mins at 65-70f, then back in the fridge for a day, then they're ready for grilling to order.  Will hopefully be in the new kitchen in a couple weeks and I'll post some results...

post #65 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

On the European use of nitrate I can only disagree - the standard curing salt mixture I can buy here is 0,5% sodium nitrite / 99.5 % sodium chloride. Ruhlmann is generally a good source, though - love that book.


In checking into Marianski's book on Home Production of Meat and Sausages, he, too, insists on the use of nitrites over nitrates.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #66 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

 

 

 

Dan, that is an awesome idea thanks!!!!!

 

 

 

 

Grumio, 

 

I have put spices and flavors but you have to put a lot. For example I did a garlic and black pepper bacon and put a good amount of garlic and I ended up with a nicely flavored bacon. I have yet to try the brine method which would probably impart more flavor.

 

I disagree (gently) with KY about two things. First fat is a fantastic absorber of flavors. In fact when I made chocolates we were very careful about how they were stored because chocolate is mostly fat and it would absorb any orders in the air (such as cigarette smoke). I also disagree with the reason for the addition of sugar. In the book Charcuterie by Brian Polcyn he suggest the use of of brown sugar or maple syrup for "added sweetness". 

 

 

One question for everyone:  Do you use just sugar and salt or do you add pink salt (curing salt, nitrate)? I do because it greatly reduces the risk of botulism.

 

 

 

Must not use nitrate in bacon !!! Nitrite is the go.

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