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post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
Cook them for 8-9 minutes and they are al dente. More than 10 minutes is overdone.


Aaaaaand you just proved my point. At least in the SoCal restaurants I go to, no one would ever cook green beans for 8 or 9 minutes. Most people around here would consider them way over cooked. More like 1-3 minutes. Sometimes I doubt they even blanch them at all, I mean I've had green beans that tasted just plain raw - probably just sauteed in a little butter.

 

 

post #32 of 57
Thread Starter 

To me, 1-3 minutes would be blanching, not cooking. It's what I do to beans when prepping them for the freezer. But 8-9 minutes is a bit too much; certainly for fresh, home-grown beans.

 

Just guessing, cuz I don't cook by the clock, but I'd say at 5-6 minutes you reach true al dente, which is the same as tender-crisp. Your teeth will sink through the veggie, but there's still be a bit of texture. What we used to call "tooth."

 

I have no doubts that once the swelling goes down I'll have no problems eating properly cooked vegetables, without haveing to go to that mush point.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #33 of 57


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post



 

Oh ok - like I said, not a big expert on Julia Child. smile.gif I was born after she published all her major work.

 


Young'un!

 

you should take a look - she is one of the best recipe writers ever - even the most complicated dishes can be made at home, following her explanations and her illustrations (which are excellent) - and there is enough chattiness without being at all overpowering but enough to get an idea of the dish, what it will taste like, how it should appear, and why to make it.

 

Not to brag, but did i mention that i have a letter from Julia Child herself?  I only ever had a problem with one dish - the orange filling of an orange cake, which wouldn't firm up - so i said what the heck, let me write to her and ask - I wrote to her via the publisher and a couple of months later received a wonderful chatty letter where, after saying how WONderful to be in rome with those WONDerful tiny artichokes etc, she explained what might have gone wrong. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #34 of 57
Thread Starter 

Are there any convenience foods that aren't made of salt?

 

I'm figuring I won't want to be doing any kitchen work, especially the first few days. So when we went shopping I grabbed some Campbell's chunky soups; then kind that come in the microwavable cups. Certainly, I figured, they'd be soft enough for me to eat. Unfortunately, I forgot to read the labels (forgivable, I guess, as I normally don't buy such products).

 

These soups contain two servings of about a cup each. I prepared one of them, and almost spit it out, it was so salty. Turns out, the three flavors I bought have sodium levels ranging from 790 to 870 mg per serving. OMG!  According to their own nutritional statement, this works out as 33-36% of the adult daily requirement. In short, one third of a healthy person's salt requirements all in one shot.

 

I've always known that a chronic complaint against convenience products is their salt content. But surely this isn't typical? Or is it?

 

Meanwhile, if anybody wants a convenient form of chicken-corn chowder or chicken-noodle soup, you're welcome to rummage through my trash for them.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #35 of 57

Smoked NC chopped BBQ Sandwich with a fine cut cole slaw,

Crab Cakes cooked anyway you like,

Chicken Salad on soft white bread,

Roast Beef sliced paper thin and gravy or au jus with mashed potatoes.

Salmon Cakes or salmon or any fish

post #36 of 57


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Not to brag, but did i mention that i have a letter from Julia Child herself?  I only ever had a problem with one dish - the orange filling of an orange cake, which wouldn't firm up - so i said what the heck, let me write to her and ask - I wrote to her via the publisher and a couple of months later received a wonderful chatty letter where, after saying how WONderful to be in rome with those WONDerful tiny artichokes etc, she explained what might have gone wrong. 


Wow that's pretty cool, that she would write back to you! And that you now have her letter! smile.gif

post #37 of 57



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Not to brag, but did i mention that i have a letter from Julia Child herself?  I only ever had a problem with one dish - the orange filling of an orange cake, which wouldn't firm up - so i said what the heck, let me write to her and ask - I wrote to her via the publisher and a couple of months later received a wonderful chatty letter where, after saying how WONderful to be in rome with those WONDerful tiny artichokes etc, she explained what might have gone wrong. 


Wow that's pretty cool, that she would write back to you! And that you now have her letter! smile.gif


Agreed.  How cool is that!!!  I hope you have it framed and showing it off on your kitchen wall!
 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Are there any convenience foods that aren't made of salt?

 

I'm figuring I won't want to be doing any kitchen work, especially the first few days. So when we went shopping I grabbed some Campbell's chunky soups; then kind that come in the microwavable cups. Certainly, I figured, they'd be soft enough for me to eat. Unfortunately, I forgot to read the labels (forgivable, I guess, as I normally don't buy such products).

 

These soups contain two servings of about a cup each. I prepared one of them, and almost spit it out, it was so salty. Turns out, the three flavors I bought have sodium levels ranging from 790 to 870 mg per serving. OMG!  According to their own nutritional statement, this works out as 33-36% of the adult daily requirement. In short, one third of a healthy person's salt requirements all in one shot.

 

I've always known that a chronic complaint against convenience products is their salt content. But surely this isn't typical? Or is it?

 

Meanwhile, if anybody wants a convenient form of chicken-corn chowder or chicken-noodle soup, you're welcome to rummage through my trash for them.


ky,

your health food store should carry some low sodium soups...both amy's and kashi brands make good products...some of the thai kitchen microwavable soups are good as well, but like everything, you need to check the label...an easy solution is ramen noodles...just add some La Yu.....miso would be dynamite for you, but you either like it or not...take care, friend

joey

milkshakes or smoothies(veggie, sweet, mega green) also

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #39 of 57


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Are there any convenience foods that aren't made of salt?

 

I'm figuring I won't want to be doing any kitchen work, especially the first few days. So when we went shopping I grabbed some Campbell's chunky soups; then kind that come in the microwavable cups. Certainly, I figured, they'd be soft enough for me to eat. Unfortunately, I forgot to read the labels (forgivable, I guess, as I normally don't buy such products).

 

These soups contain two servings of about a cup each. I prepared one of them, and almost spit it out, it was so salty. Turns out, the three flavors I bought have sodium levels ranging from 790 to 870 mg per serving. OMG!  According to their own nutritional statement, this works out as 33-36% of the adult daily requirement. In short, one third of a healthy person's salt requirements all in one shot.

 

I've always known that a chronic complaint against convenience products is their salt content. But surely this isn't typical? Or is it?

 

Meanwhile, if anybody wants a convenient form of chicken-corn chowder or chicken-noodle soup, you're welcome to rummage through my trash for them.


I think the thing i most resent about the quantity of salt in these things is that it has created a backlash movement and now every recipe i come across is practically salt free.  True, i'm a goat when it comes to salt (and fortunately have the predisposition for low blood pressure no matter what i eat- I know, lucky)  - so my desire for salt is higher than most, but the recipes in my 1950 cookbooks have much more salt (pancakes, muffins, etc), without being in this exaggerated class of convenience foods.  Just recently my son brought back a few packs of thomas english muffins from the states.  I LOVE those.  One of the things i miss the most.  But there was something wrong with them, they weren't as good as i remembered.  Then i thought it might be the salt - i sprinkled them with salt and they were just as i remembered them.  These were not overly salted before, but because the crap food is so oversalted, now the good food has to be tasteless!  What a shame. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #40 of 57
Thread Starter 

Thanks Joey, I'll check out those brands. And, lesson learned: always read the label. Actually, I grabbed them thinking they'd be a change from ramen, of which I've stocked up several kinds.

 

Funny thing is we do read labels, normally, because of Friend Wife's diabeties. But it's the carbs we mostly look at.

 

What surprises me is how anything that inedible stays on the market. I can't see how anybody would buy them a second time, convenient or not. I mean, my God! They talk about the high sodium levels in boxed stock. But that's a whole quart, not a single serving.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #41 of 57
Thread Starter 

I think the thing i most resent about the quantity of salt in these things is that it has created a backlash movement .....

 

I reckon you're on to something there, Siduri.

 

Of course, when something is low in salt we can fix it. But with the opposite we're just stuck. Not much can fix oversalting; especially to the degree of those soups.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #42 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

I think the thing i most resent about the quantity of salt in these things is that it has created a backlash movement .....

 

I reckon you're on to something there, Siduri.

 

Of course, when something is low in salt we can fix it. But with the opposite we're just stuck. Not much can fix oversalting; especially to the degree of those soups.


True enough, and considering my tendency to like salty food, I always undersalt when cooking and have a salt shaker handy.  But i wonder how these canned products survive - but then again, I wonder how most people seem to eat crap every day all the time.  My brother, in the US, buys all kinds of low-fat, low-salt, low-calorie junk food.  They get home and start opening things - of course none of it is very satisfying so they keep eating more.  They consume large quantities of junk - from before dinner with low fat low salt chips with low fat "lite" dips and "cheese", followed by some takeout or some pre-made thingy, or a steak on the grill, followed by "lite" pudding cups (not even refrigerated, because nothing they contain is made of cells or organic matter, and so it doesn't go bad! Then at last, a big half gallon of ice "creme" ("lite") with "lite" "chocolate" sauce.  I guess at that point, they don;t notice the salty soup which is the least of their problems!

 

Good luck with your surgery.  Maybe you should freeze some soups for the first days and you can puree them at different levels of creaminess for the gradual healing process.  Having had several teeth removed (one at a time) in the past, my problem after the first day of pain, was that tiny bits of food would get stuck under the stitches or in the holes and bumps of the healing gum.  You don;t want to have to dig them out with your tongue until the gum is completely healed because they hurt.  

I imagine you'll want very savory things, because most creamy food is not very satisfying for real hunger.  How about baba ganoosh? nice and garlicky and satisfying - or did i mention it already?  And don;t forget you can grate parmigiano onto soups and things and add a level of savoriness and also some valuable protein. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #43 of 57
Thread Starter 

Well, I'm back from the dentist, sans teeth.

 

Before the pain kicks in I wanted to thank all y'all for the suggestions and expressions of support. It is well appreciated. And demonstrates why this is a true community, not just a bunch of folks posting on forums.

 

Thank you one and all.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #44 of 57

 Feel better KYH!

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #45 of 57

Cook luck and bon appetit thumb.gif

At least you got plenty suggestions for meals!

 

Hope you recover quickly

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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post #46 of 57

Get well soon KYH, or else!

 

The moment you can pronounce this french sentence correctly, you're good:

"Un chasseur sachant chasser sait chasser sans son chien de chasse". This is how it sounds like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmZaRrw3t1Q&feature=related

post #47 of 57

Good one Chris!

The one we were taught at school:

Le chien ne chasse pas le chat, parceque en france les chien and les chat sont amis

 

That was more than 30 years ago and I never forgot (although my spelling is probably slightly faulty)

(the dog doesn't chase the cat, because in France, dogs and cats are friends)

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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post #48 of 57

All the best for a quick recovery KY.

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #49 of 57
Thread Starter 

I reckon I'll never be good, Chris, cuz I couldn't pronounce that even before my teeth went bad. redface.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #50 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

I reckon I'll never be good, Chris, cuz I couldn't pronounce that even before my teeth went bad. redface.gif

 

Try it after a glass or two... and then it doesn't matter if you are French or not, it doesn't matter if you have teeth or not, it's a big laugh, guaranteed. Well maybe not if you're doing it by yourself, but if you're trying it with some friends. biggrin.gif

 

Hope you don't suffer too much from the pain KYH. Now starts the challenge of producing good tasting soft foods! Let us know how that goes.
 

post #51 of 57

Have a good recovery KY!  I wish you lots of crunchy things and corn on the cobs in the not too far future.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #52 of 57

ky,

glad you made it back alive....i do have a question though, not to hijack your thread, but its driving me buggy not to ask...not just you, but to all here....are you the main kitchen domo in your house? do you do the lions share of the meal planning, shopping, schlepping, cooking? i know in my house i pretty much do it all as my husband has absolutely zip, nada, zero, interest in anything food, except for eating...he thinks putting cereal in a bowl is making breakfast, god love him...god knows what he thinks the refrigerator is for...guess to hold the milk!...and of course the beer!...anyway,please don't take this wrong, ky, as it is nothing more than curiosity, but when you asked for soft foods ideas, i kept thinking, why doesn't your lovely wife cook you up a few things, for a few days...please forgive me if i stepped where i shouldn't...you know, it is not my style to be nosey...maybe, you just needed/wanted some new ideas....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #53 of 57
Thread Starter 

Friend Wife and I do meal/menu planning and shopping together. But I do about 90% of the cooking. Maybe even more than that.

 

When we were first wed she, literally, could not cook. Her mother was the worst cook I've ever known, and, thankfully, my bride at least hadn't picked up bad habits from her mom. Instead, her attitude was that the only thing a lady made for dinner was reservations.

 

So I taught her how to cook. But it's not something she particularly enjoys doing. In fact, she belongs to the Rachal Ray school of cooking: if it takes more than a half hour it's not worth making. So, by way of example, she went out and bought some puddings for me. When she got home and unpacked them she was complaining that she'd accidentally grabbed one that required cooking. Uh, huh! Waddawe talkin? Throw the stuff in a pot with some milk and bring it to a boil, right?

 

That most emphatically does not apply to eating, you understand. She loves to eat; just prefers that somebody else prepare it.

 

All that aside, I was just basically looking for new ideas. You know me, Joey; I bore easily.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #54 of 57
Thread Starter 

Just an update.

 

First off, either my dentist is a genious (quite likely) or others have made more of this procedure than there is.

 

I was in the chair about 2 1/2 hours. A little longer than I've heard, but maybe that's why I'm in better shape? Following his instructions, I took a pain pill as soon as I got home, before the novacain wore off. I took a second one, on schedule. And should have taken at least one more, but fell asleep before it was due.

 

Woke up yesterday morning with virtually no pain. And not enough swelling to even mention.

 

So, so far, the worst part of the procedure was the taste of the topical anesthetic he used before administering the shots. And getting used to the fact there are no teeth there. I keep wanting to use them.

 

So far as food. Tuesday I had puddings, jello, and liquids. Yesterday I had more or less real food, so long as it didn't require chewing. For lunch I made steamed pot sticker in broth, for instance. For dinner I made a tuna tortilla topped with caponata. Also discovered that I can handle quick breads, so long as I break them into small pieces first. Been gorging on my pumpkin-cheese bread, for instance.

 

Haven't decided on lunch for today, yet. But I'm planning a Tortilla Espanole for this evening. And will be trying Chris' shiitake flans as well.

 

Based on all this I'm guessing that as soon as the gums start to heal and harden up there won't be too many things I won't be able to eat. Maybe not steak and corn on the cob until the dentures go in, but no a whole lot less than that either.

 

Thanks again to everyone for your suggestions and well wishes.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #55 of 57

There's a nice dipping sauce that you can make very easily. And it surely is a soft one. You can use it with potato chips (taco chips very good too). Why not with everything else as well :D

 

Finnish Way Dipping Sauce

 

- 4oz sour cream

- 4oz salsa sauce (Like this)

 

Just put them in a deep plate and mix with spoon. Leave in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.

 

Were you excepting something more complex? This is it. Just 2 ingredients and very easy instructions. The sour cream brings freshness to the salsa sauce so it's a nice combination!

 

Bon Appétit / Hyvää ruokahalua!

post #56 of 57
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Aksellson.

 

Right now the only way I could eat that would be by the spoonful. Give my gums a chance to harden up, though, and it sounds like a nice snack.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #57 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Thanks, Aksellson.

 

Right now the only way I could eat that would be by the spoonful. Give my gums a chance to harden up, though, and it sounds like a nice snack.


Ok, take your time, for he who suffers conquers!

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