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post #151 of 504

OK. So maybe I miscommunicated my point. I season absolutely properly with all things excluding SALT. People use too much SALT, and wouldn't know proper flavors if they jumped off the plate and smashed them in the face. Why come eat the food of a really good chef? What is the value of dining on great fresh ingredients if you are going to dump SALT all over everything? TOO ... MUCH ... SALT. Is that any clearer now than before? LOL. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guts View Post

Quote:

I'm also fed up with every so-called "expert judge" on some stupid cooking/food TV competition claiming "lack of seasoning".

I'm not so sure about this one. I mean, one of the first things you should learn getting into this industry is how and when to properly season items during the cooking process - right?


 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #152 of 504

salt for me is necessary to heat the body, i`m "bold blooded", but it really destroys anything when it`s too much

post #153 of 504

I hated being in bed because I it was suppose to be my scheduled day off only to be called in to do prep and clean.  My pants were all dirty so I had to sew up a pair because it was quicker than doing laundry.

 

I hate that the FOH server was so terrible I ended up having to blow his nose for him and do all his dishes.  I don't mind stepping up at  any station but this guy was just plain horrible.   He couldn't even make his own salads.  I hate that management puts up with it!  I didn't get my work done because some slacker on FOH can't do his job.

 

I do love my chef, we are the perfect melody, we say few words yet speak volumes.   Each plate is made to perfection and with everything we can give.

post #154 of 504


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rat View Post

 

I miss the days when people were valued and work places were really like family, nowadays money is above all. Show one weakness and you are gone. Saw a cook who was sick one time get fired because he did not call out 24 hours notice. I do not think the most succesfull chef is the one who puts his or her job above all else. The successfull chef is the one who trys to bring people up on the way to the top, not the one who steps on everyone.

 

Well said!
 

 

post #155 of 504

When your work surface is about 1.5" too short. My back is fricking killing me.

post #156 of 504

That's  an easy fix.

 

Get four bricks. Most Home Despots have them for like 89 cents each.

 

Stuff one brick under each prep table leg.  End of shift collect your bricks back and stuff them in your locker.

 

Knew a couple of 6' guys who would do that.  Either that, or they'd  "Liberate" a dish rack, and put a cutting board on top of that.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #157 of 504

I like the brick idea. Never heard that before.

post #158 of 504

Ya'll need to shrink a few inches.

 

Waiting, just waiting for the stack of dishes I have to JUMP to grab, to come crashing down on my head.

All the dishwashers are 6 foot plus. 

It sucks during a busy plating to have to ask one of my cooks to reach the plate for me...

Helps keep me humble, I guess.

 

Last place I worked had milk crates under all the prep tables.

The small 4 foot table w/out milk crates was mine.

 

Maybe try the milk crates, thetincoook.  They're pretty inexpensive if you steal them.

 

post #159 of 504

bounce.gif


Edited by ChefET - 7/24/11 at 8:28am
post #160 of 504

 sometimes feeling that you are nothing more than a meal ticket for your waitstaff, which may be true, but me no likey...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #161 of 504

I used to work the roasted meat station for a large buffet at a really nice place. All the while I'm carving up beautiful prime-rib. By the end of service I've put together a nice plate of yummyness that I plan to finish off myself. I hate the bageebies out of waitstaff who feel like that is theirs for the taking. The bartenders are the worst. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #162 of 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I used to work the roasted meat station for a large buffet at a really nice place. All the while I'm carving up beautiful prime-rib. By the end of service I've put together a nice plate of yummyness that I plan to finish off myself. I hate the bageebies out of waitstaff who feel like that is theirs for the taking. The bartenders are the worst. 


Ha ha but you were the one with the knife.

 

 

Quote;

What pisses me off is when waiters can't ring in tickets correctly and are always coming back to modify them!

 

Yeah this one gets me too, aint it always the same people? You just know that 30 seconds after the ticket prints she or he will rush into the kitchen red faced and flustered with a big long story to go with every every ticket, every table, every day..........yawn.

post #163 of 504

When the ticket reads "see server", and 20 minutes later, "where's my table 10 food?" I haven't fired it yet..."why not?" I was waiting for your see server modification, "oh yea, it's sauce on the side, I need that on the fly now because you never fired it!"...Sauce on the side?!! It would've been done 10 minutes ago if you used the SOS button and I'm not going to waste my cooks make it twice because you didn't follow the right steps.

post #164 of 504

Chef's arse!!!!!!!!!!

post #165 of 504

I get what you're saying about people absent-mindedly dumping salt on their food without even tasting it.  For those people I don't even care.  If they want to ruin their food without even tasting it, as long as their paying for it, it's their taste buds.  But for everyone else, the way I see it is I'm the chef of my station & I'm going to determine how well my food is seasoned, and I trust my sense of taste.  What I'd love to do if I ran my own place is to not even put salt & pepper shakers on the tables.  If someone asks for them, the servers would tell them the food is already seasoned but if the food isn't to their liking we can bring it out for them.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

OK. So maybe I miscommunicated my point. I season absolutely properly with all things excluding SALT. People use too much SALT, and wouldn't know proper flavors if they jumped off the plate and smashed them in the face. Why come eat the food of a really good chef? What is the value of dining on great fresh ingredients if you are going to dump SALT all over everything? TOO ... MUCH ... SALT. Is that any clearer now than before? LOL. 

 



 



 

post #166 of 504

I'm with A_mak.

post #167 of 504

Getting an email complaint by a guest because she didn't like my tattoo on my forearm and calling me a dishwasher while I was doing a table visit.

post #168 of 504

LOL. I'm feeling for you Deacon. I think there's a whole thread about that tattoo idea here somewhere. Or maybe, I don't know, it might even be this thread. OUCH. You don't have a bone in your nose too, do you? Anyway, tough situation my friend. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #169 of 504

Congrats, Iceman, you just won a golden can opener for opening up that can of worms....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #170 of 504

LOL. Look, I'm just letting the poor guy know that I have sincere empathy for what happened to him. I also tried to let him in on the fact that there has been serious discussion about that particular topic. Maybe if he takes time and reads through it, he can find some closure in that he is not alone in his situation. I'm just trying to be a friend. 

 

Now as for that can opener .................... (LOL. Crack Me Up!!!)

 

?url=http%3A%2F%2Fupload.wikimedia.org%2Fwikipedia%2Fcommons%2Fthumb%2Fc%2Fce%2FPlutchik-wheel.svg%2F90px-Plutchik-wheel.svg.png&t=1311708159&ttl=43200&maxWidth=98&maxHeight=74&sig=.5bqC.ANt27Wz8qLOu_C5Q--~B

 

 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #171 of 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

LOL. I'm feeling for you Deacon. I think there's a whole thread about that tattoo idea here somewhere. Or maybe, I don't know, it might even be this thread. OUCH. You don't have a bone in your nose too, do you? Anyway, tough situation my friend. 



Haha, no piercings on this guy but I'll search for that tattoo thread. 

post #172 of 504

This thread has gone on and on for a while now. Everybody is sharing their experiences, but the one theme through out all of this seems to be the utter lack of respect for the Chef and his/her role in running the place. Time and time again when I go out to eat I am confronted with situations where the FOH and BOH can't get their act together and work as the team they should be.

 

2 nights a go I went out to dinner in the hotel where I stayed. I know the Chef. He's a hard working good guy. He is an "Certified Executive Chef" through the ACF, in fact, he has credits to teach the course that confirms Chefs in that role, so he knows what he's talking about. 

To me, it's the Chef's role to educate the FOH about the food, what's in it, what is today's specials, what's the soup for today, etc....

Also in that role, the Chef should be working with the staff so they can properly communicate his creations to the customer. After all, the Chef's responsible for the customers well being.

 

Then why:

 

Does the wait person not know the difference between Gorgonzola and Italian Dressing?

Not know the wine list so that the customer must point out the requested wine from the list?

Not know the specials of the day and how they are prepared/....and as a matter of fact, really doesn't know the menu all that well either?

Does not listen to the customer and brings out the food when the kitchen has it ready and NOT when the customer is ready?

 

I guess I'll never understand why, from the food stand point, the FOH doesn't give the Chef his due. There are many many places out there that get it right. I enjoy it when it happens.

On the other hand, this point is something that most customers don't have any clue about.  It really is sad.

 

post #173 of 504

ooo ooo, I have one

 

Coming in this morning to make my bread/desserts.. looking around

hmmm what's different??

oh, wait wasn't there 5# of Hazelnuts there?

 

OK.. to other sous..

UM.. where are my..

 

Oh ya, nitwit line cook thought they were garbanzo beans and boiled them off

 

Oh for real

 

THERE'S A REASON WHY I'm a dessert/pastry chef now.. it's so I DON'T have to deal with the monkeys!

(thanks I feel better)

post #174 of 504

You are all going to dislike this one.  The worst thing about being a chef is being a chef.  I have been doing this for 22 years and at 42 years of age I think it is the absolute stupidest job anyone could ever want to do.  Yeah yeah, I know what all about the love of cooking and all that BS but lets get real.  To make any money in this industry you have to sell your soul.  Forget your love of cooking as this is what you got into the business for.  To make any money you don't get to cook anymore, you become an administrator, accountant, scheduler, contract negotiator and overall baby sitter.  I have a family now and a young daughter and all I do is work my ass off.  Why would anyone in their right mind choose a career that requires often in excess of 70 hours a week, nights, weekends and holidays?????  When I got into this business at 19 obviously these things weren't on my mind, but they sure as hell are now.  I'm burned out and can't go start a new career because I would take about a 75% pay cut.  Not to mention all the a$$holes I work for that have absolutely no appreciation for what a good chef does.  Some of you may be offended by this post, but if you haven't hit your 40's yet you will know when you have.  It isn't as easy on the body as it used to be a few years back and it only gets worse.  I think constantly these days about what Anthony Bourdain said in one of his books, "you don't want to be standing in a kitchen in your mid 40's".  All you younger guys and gals, stop and think about what the future holds for you and how much time you will give up.  Prospective culinary students ask me all the time if they should go to culinary school and become a chef.  I tell them no way, enjoy cooking at home, take some leisure classes but go out and find something else as a career.  I have been fortunate in my career to have seen many different aspects of the industry.  I started out as a pastry chef and now work as a Corporate Executive Chef for a national chain.  I have cooked personally for two former presidents of the united states (as personal chef), worked at the Food Network (and rubbed elbows with all those Jack A$$e$ that think they are important), have run 5 star hotel kitchens, done a lot of live television cooking, have been a featured chef and at times a local celebrity, have owned my very own gourmet taco trailer and once was lucky enough to fly down to an island for a week and cook for Mohammed Ali.  I have been around the block.  But nothing, NOTHING is more important than the time I get to spend with my family and NOTHING can make up for the time I have lost with them while pursuing this foolish career.  For all you haters, you have to admit this is a fair point of veiw albeit a different one than is generally posted on this forum.  I back all of you up in my industry and respect the hell out of anyone that takes this on as a career.  It is HARD WORK and there aren't to many people outside of our industry who realize just how hard it is.  Peace out and as Mr. Bourdain has been known to say, "Cooks Rule!"  

 

P.S.  I am expecting to get my a$$ chewed up by those that are outraged, so let the public flogging begin.  I stand by what I say....

post #175 of 504

Well ... I think Anthony Bourdain is an idiot, so quoting or referencing anything that he thinks is wasted on me. Now for someone with the credentials you just gave us, in your very first post ...

Quote:
I have been fortunate in my career to have seen many different aspects of the industry.  I started out as a pastry chef and now work as a Corporate Executive Chef for a national chain.  I have cooked personally for two former presidents of the [U]nited [S]tates (as personal chef), worked at the Food Network (and rubbed elbows with all those Jack A$$e$ that think they are important), have run 5 star hotel kitchens, done a lot of live television cooking, have been a featured chef and at times a local celebrity, have owned my very own gourmet taco trailer and once was lucky enough to fly down to an island for a week and cook for Mohammed Ali.  I have been around the block.

 

... I think you should be financially well off enough to live a comfortable life. Unless of course you maybe lived a little bit too large while doing all these things in your career. To do all this by age 42? Yeah, you should be OK, I think. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #176 of 504

Ah, TXvoodoo,

The secret is not what's in the box, the secret is opening the box.

 

Meh, I just had my 47th b'day and I'm still working my azz off.

 

The only thing that is different from you, is that I work for myself.  Everything else applies.

 

Biggest thrill I ever got was last year when  my old ex-employer come in with some of my "regulars". Dip-wad (ex employer) was unaware that it was my place. The dude starts sniffing around the place, sees some of my medals and diplomas on the wall, and --according to my wife-- turns white then purple, then the colour of a rotten strawberry.  Demands to see me.  I'm too busy, but he can call, and he does.  After 15 years he's still looking for an angle to kick me in the ass, but he can't.  My place has been running for 5 years now, moderately sucesfull, moderate media exposure, and happy clients. For him, after running his place 40 years, the lease expires and the landlord kicks him out--big splash in the papers, but he's still looking for angle to kick me in the azz..

 

Nice to have you  on board. 

 

Please use more paragraphs

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #177 of 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

 

Nice to have you  on board. 

 

Please use more paragraphs



Awww, I thought the stream-of-consciousness rant was a time honored ChefTalk tradition. I think I'd miss it if it went away ;)

 

This certainly wouldn't apply as the WORST thing about being a chef, but it's always bothered me how few people want to cook for chefs. What I mean is, family members, friends, etc all seem to want to apologize for their food when serving me. I can't go eat at someone's house, or whatever, without the host apologizing to me for not meeting some imaginary standards that I didn't communicate nor actually have. I think Anthony Bourdain said something to this effect in KC. A lot of times it doesn't even matter how it tastes, the best thing is that I didn't have to cook it. 

 

Usually, one of the last thing I want to do after a long day and a long week of cooking is to go home and, well, cook. There are exceptions of course, sometimes it's fun to flex chef muscles with friends and family. 

 

I also seem to have a lot of family members who always want advice about dishes and appetizers to take to parties and such. I usually have a couple of ideas to help out, of course, but sometimes spontaneous creativity just won't come. I mean, I have to take into account the varying skill levels, equipment, time, etc that we all take for granted in a pro kitchen. I can't tell my mom to brulee a fig half, throw on a bit of parma ham, shaved parmesan and aged balsamic. Or to deep fry arancini balls. Stuff I can take for granted cause I have expensive ingredients, deep fryers, torches, time, and experience all on my side. 

 

I suppose this is true of a lot of professions though--accountants get asked for tax advice, nurses get peppered for health issues, contractors for repair advice, cops and lawyers for legal advice, etc, etc. So its certainly not unique to being a chef. 

 

 

post #178 of 504

I find it's kinda like a kick in the crotch when I make a great dish, bring it to a party, and people eat more of the pre-packaged garbage from a store than my stuff. It happens in such rarity to me, but when it does it really hurts. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #179 of 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post





Awww, I thought the stream-of-consciousness rant was a time honored ChefTalk tradition. I think I'd miss it if it went away ;)

 

This certainly wouldn't apply as the WORST thing about being a chef, but it's always bothered me how few people want to cook for chefs. What I mean is, family members, friends, etc all seem to want to apologize for their food when serving me. I can't go eat at someone's house, or whatever, without the host apologizing to me for not meeting some imaginary standards that I didn't communicate nor actually have. I think Anthony Bourdain said something to this effect in KC. A lot of times it doesn't even matter how it tastes, the best thing is that I didn't have to cook it. 

 

Usually, one of the last thing I want to do after a long day and a long week of cooking is to go home and, well, cook. There are exceptions of course, sometimes it's fun to flex chef muscles with friends and family. 

 

I also seem to have a lot of family members who always want advice about dishes and appetizers to take to parties and such. I usually have a couple of ideas to help out, of course, but sometimes spontaneous creativity just won't come. I mean, I have to take into account the varying skill levels, equipment, time, etc that we all take for granted in a pro kitchen. I can't tell my mom to brulee a fig half, throw on a bit of parma ham, shaved parmesan and aged balsamic. Or to deep fry arancini balls. Stuff I can take for granted cause I have expensive ingredients, deep fryers, torches, time, and experience all on my side. 

 

I suppose this is true of a lot of professions though--accountants get asked for tax advice, nurses get peppered for health issues, contractors for repair advice, cops and lawyers for legal advice, etc, etc. So its certainly not unique to being a chef. 

 

 



I can't go anywhere without this being brought up. My reply: You cooked it, I'm eating it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I find it's kinda like a kick in the crotch when I make a great dish, bring it to a party, and people eat more of the pre-packaged garbage from a store than my stuff. It happens in such rarity to me, but when it does it really hurts. 



A friend of mine has several large get togethers every year, I'm always invited.

 

They always supply the whiskey, appitizers and proteins, usually salmon and elk, everyone else brings the sides.

Most of what shows up is from a package, or what is made from scratch is inedible....Flour tortillas layered with ground beef, mushroom soup and cheese..... Really?  or spinach salad with frozen strawberries in syrup and ranch dressing......

 

I made a roasted red potato salad w/ green beans, bacon & balsamic last time, it was gone before everyone had made the rounds....and I made plenty.

They always want to know a recipe, how do you tell someone how to make something when their best dish is something that starts off with two cans of mushroom soup, and seasoned salt and pepper are their only spices?

 

post #180 of 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingzilla View Post

I started out in the kitchen at very young age opening my own small kitchen with a friend mostly delivering foods to surrounded businesses.  I loved it, we even made good money, then we sold it with a good profit after operating for two years.  My friend went to college, I went to kitchen and loved it.  Everyday I looked forward to learning a new skill, perfecting my skill and watching food network on my days off, dreaming big.  I was just like those interns or hobbyist who are passionate about working in the kitchen, and seeing them now made me feel bittersweet.  I started my own restaurant raising funds from friends and family, business was a success and everyone wanted a piece of the pie.  My investors wanted to get more involved then my comfort zone.  They started controlling my payrolls, cutting here and there.  I had a balanced working team until my most relied members parted off looking for their own ventures, my investors loved it so they can hire cheaper less qualified employees.  'Oh you the Chef you can train them and we save money'. After coming back from a vacation I had realized they fired my GM to save money, so I ended up with no GM, the FOH started to break apart, 'Oh you have to learn to manage the FOH as well'.  Soon enough it no longer became my own business, I was working for them and worst of all I can't just quit, I got too much to loose.

 

When every time a new health inspector comes bossing us around yet we can do nothing but kissing

  • Why is it every time a new inspector comes they change the rules, 'Oh he/she (previous inspector) was wrong, you have to do it this way and since you weren't following the proper   code I have take a point off'  I can do nothing but smile and say yes I'll follow you master.

 

When something brakes and trying to find an honest handy man and realize you just got ripped off,

  • I bet this happens to almost every private kitchen, I mean I used to have a great handy man until he passed away from an accident.  Since then I am having the hardest time finding honest skilled handy man.  Even after an interview, sometime they just make it worst and you end up with a higher bill or end up replacing the whole unit.

 

When your team steals behind your back,

  • I really don't want to take extremes placing someone or my self digging through all the trash before they get thrown out of the restaurant, but it really sucks when you accidently catch someone stealing from you and makes you wonder 'is anyone or everyone stealing from me?

 

When I have to deal with cooks flirting with other waiter sometimes accidently seeing them in the making out in the storage room,

  • Get a room away from the public please keep it private, I don't mind workers hooking up heck that's how I met my wife but common sense please.

 

When getting sued by employee who are still working in the same kitchen,

  • I had a cook who sued me over an injury that never happened my kitchen, it didn't pass the workers comp after an investigation.  I knew he was injured after a street fight he got involved at a bar which my other cook had witnessed, I tried to help him out paying part of his medical bills only to be sued later for reducing his shifts.

 

When I have to work on my family special occasions like birthdays like my son's first birthday, not only breaks my heart but my family as well

  • This just sucked, one of the reasons why I wanted to open my own business to have more control with my life and better financial control.

 

When I realized every time after work I am only getting older and wondering how long I got more in me to stay in my position fearing I might become like one of those 20 plus years cooks

  • I once met a Chef when I was just starting out, he was the King and now sadly he is just a cook at a local night club, what happened I don't know, I didn't have the guts to ask him. That was really hard to swallow for me.
  • I bet a lot of us fear this, many of us are really under paid for the amount of passion and hours we bring in to the plate, some do make a great living but after years of working in this industry even having my own restaurant, I feel like an actor who barely made it in between.  I am ambitious but that just don't seem enough... that's why I really envy/hate (more jealousy) the Chefs/Acting Chefs who made it.

 

Every time I go on sites like Craigslist looking for career change and realize it won't be easy,

  • The grass is greener on the other side.  It is what it is, I love what I do but at the same time I am just being human

 

I really hate when I get interns or someone who is like a lawyer telling me how they envy my position and how passionate they are willing to give up their high paying salary so they can be like me

  • I guess I am burnt out but sometimes it gets under your skin.  Maybe its an envy where they stand is probably the best place to be, dreaming.

 

 

Why did I ever become a chef in the first place, most of all I hate/envy celeb Chef's like David Chang who really in my opinion got very lucky who isn't a real Chef but interns telling me how

great a Chef is.

  • It's kind of like when you turn on a radio and hear the same tune playing over and over again until you start getting sick of it, that's how it was for me and DC.
  • I became a Chef because the same reasons why many of passionate Chef has decided to become a Chef, it takes a lot of work and hard work, I salute to all the hard working Chefs.

 

I never had a problem with late clients as I viewed them as extra sales, but I really can't stand when my investors show up before/after closing bossing me around and my team to cook for them until whenever they want to stay.  Restaurant is a food business but also I learned its a people business, I guess just knowing how to cook and managing a kitchen is not enough being a great Chef/Owner, now after writing this I see a bigger picture of what I need to learn and manage my own business. 

 

This thread has given me a chance to release my frustrations and start fresh again, I hope it lasts, haha. thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

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