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Worst things about being a Chef - Page 8

post #211 of 514
When u forget to take the dog out of the car boot on your split.. And the girl friend rings during service asking"did u see the dog before u went back to work" oh s***..smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif...


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post #212 of 514
When you get home after a long day on the line and your spouse asks "what's for dinner" *face palm*
post #213 of 514

IT REALLY REALLY SUCKS ............... 

 

When grills run out of gas!!!

 

 

 

 

* And how stupid I feel for letting it happen. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #214 of 514

-The smell of the grease trap after a seafood night

-Really good cuts or burns.

-Really good cuts or burns caused by someone ELSE.

-Having a screaming meltdown in German to illustrate how sick I am of rude people speaking Spanish and Hatian Patois in my kitchen.

-Non cooks telling me what's wrong.

-Patients' family members ordering for them, and arguing with staff that the medically ordered diet is "wrong."

-Family members eating off patients' plates after having them order extra to avoid paying for another meal.

-Getting partial or incorrect info from the nursing staff, then being thrown under a bus by them because my 18 year old server gave the patient the wrong thing.

-Anyone else handling my knives.

-Well meaning people running my knife through the dishwasher. (AAAAAAAGGGHHHHHHH!!!!!!!)

-Hospital staff banging on the service bell in the staff cafeteria because I'm down 3 people and still have to feed the patients.

-SYSCO. In general.

"Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously."
Hunter S. Thompson
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"Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously."
Hunter S. Thompson
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post #215 of 514

Dumping stock bones.

They are hot, sticky, and heavy.

 

Bashing in the heads of pheasants/ducks?

Its bloody work.

post #216 of 514
Quote:

Bashing in the heads of pheasants/ducks?

Its bloody work.

 

Dezie,

 

When you say you bash , what do you mean by that ?...just curious.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #217 of 514

Going for break, or steppping out for a bit, coming back and finding my work station "all cleaned up"

(synonym=ransacked?) some of the mise en place I'd done mysteriously disappeared, their monkey

dishes washed and put away, searching for my good wood-handled chef knives and finding them

soaking in the sanitation sink for the last 30 minutes. Argh.

post #218 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

Dezie,

 

When you say you bash , what do you mean by that ?...just curious.

 

Petals.

I mean that quite literally.

Today in class we had to kill pheasants, wrapped their heads in a towel and hit them with the blunt end of a heavy cleaver. 

Then we hung them by their necks and theyll be sitting there like that for the next 8 weeks.

post #219 of 514

Dezie, I think I want to throw up. Why not just cut their heads off like a chicken? Is this in the U.S?

post #220 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dezie View Post

I mean that quite literally.

Today in class we had to kill pheasants, wrapped their heads in a towel and hit them with the blunt end of a heavy cleaver. 

Then we hung them by their necks and theyll be sitting there like that for the next 8 weeks.

 

I understand hanging the meat, but "bashing their head in", damn.

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #221 of 514

My dad used to just break the neck and then hang for a few days (leave the innards where they are) .

This "ages" and "tenderizes" the meat.

If you chop off the head all the blood runs out .

Blood is what gives the meat such a rich and unusual flavor.

Disgusting, no?

 

mimi

post #222 of 514

Dezie,

 

Here is some info I thought you may want to read. My boss used to bring home many pheasants or he would receive them as gifts when his friends would come over. They always snapped the neck (unless it was shot) . No suffering to the animal. He also hung the animal for 1-3 days in the fridge.

I will only eat meat that has been bled. To each his own.

 

 

Quote:
Then we hung them by their necks and theyll be sitting there like that for the next 8 weeks.

That is a long time to hang.....

It will have enough time to grow its feathers back.

 

 

Slaughtering:

With poultry, the jugular vein is cut to ensure good bleeding for a white carcase that is full of ‘bloom’. However, pheasants are dark-fleshed, and bleeding is not necessary. Some processors prefer to kill birds by dislocating or cracking the neck so that no bleeding occurs. This helps to maintain carcase flavour.

 

Hanging (for home consumption)

Hanging pheasants after killing is a traditional way to develop a ‘gamy’ flavour. There is no difference to the gaminess or texture of the meat whether birds are hung by the neck or legs.

After killing, birds can be hung either before or after plucking, with the viscera still intact or removed. Gaminess is increased if feathers and viscera are not removed. The temperature at which birds are hung, and the period of hanging, will depend on the degree of gaminess required.

Pheasants hung for 9 days at 10°C have been found by overseas taste panels to be more acceptable than those hung for 4 days at 15°C or for 18 days at 5°C. The taste panels thought that the birds stored at 15°C were tougher than those held for longer periods at lower temperatures. Pheasants hung at 10°C became more ‘gamy’ in flavour and more tender with length of hanging.

If carcases are kept too long at too high a temperature, ‘greening’ occurs followed by the development of ‘off’ odours. Greening first occurs in the area of the vent and is caused by hydrogen sulfide produced by gut micro-organisms. Although extensive changes take place in microbial flora in the intestines during hanging, the muscle tissues remain free of harmful bacteria. If too much greening has occurred then the carcase should be wiped over with a cloth dipped in vinegar.

In conjunction with the Consumer Education Freezing of Foods Council (NSW) preliminary trials have been conducted with taste panels using pheasant carcases which have been hung for varying periods of time from 0–11 days. For tasting purposes pheasant flesh from 18-week-old males was submitted fresh, and, after hanging for 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 or 11 days at a temperature of 15°C, the carcases were roasted in oven bags at 190°C for 1¼ hours.

The taste panel consisted of some members who had not tasted pheasant before and others who were used to eating pheasant meat. The age of members of the panel varied from about 20–50 years of age. All members of the panel agreed that pheasants hung for at least 3 days were more acceptable than those hung for a shorter period. Some members preferred birds to be hung for more than a week.

 

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/poultry/species/pheasant-raising/processing

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #223 of 514

Ah maybe I miss heard the chef when he said how long they would hang.

post #224 of 514

The fact that you have to  kill and dress these birds is not always easy, and that is the point.

 

ps. your avatar looks so peaceful, very nice.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #225 of 514

Thanks Petals! 

The pic is of where my soon to be wife and I will be exchange vows.

 

I want to change my Worst Part.

 

I now say roux burns...but more than that when its a splash burn of roux...like a brown or brick roux.

 

My arms hurt...........................................

post #226 of 514

Hopefully they will heal fast.

The worse for me are cuts to the tips of my fingers. We try to use the claw method but there are days when you have so much on your mind/lack of sleep/thinking of the pots on the stove....and before you know it ..........cut.  Always have to think ahead.....

 

It is so nice to hear that you are engaged to be married and that your vows will be done there at that beautiful place. Love is in the air Cheftalk, and we love it !!!  (where is the heart emoticon when you need it ?) 

Oh my goodness, I pressed the small size button and out popped this big guy !!! LOL. I have this one on my cell....(emoji app for iphone)

Dezie, we look forward to more of your posts. Learning new things in the culinary world is an neverending process.....

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #227 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noeler View Post

When u forget to take the dog out of the car boot on your split.. And the girl friend rings during service asking"did u see the dog before u went back to work" oh s***..smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif...
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

You put your dog in the trunk of your car and then left it there? Why would you ever put a dog in the trunk of your car in the first place?

post #228 of 514
When a }*#*~€ing. Bartender come in the kitchen and telling me that on tv Gordon Ramsey put the meat on the left corner on the pan ... Why I put it on the middle ... Trying to teach me what she learn watching tv.. During full service time ?!?!,!!?! I have a wish to take a gun and .......

Anyway I love my job..

About last minute walk in guest .. In my kitchen is simple ... Kitchen close 22:00 but I stay half hour more every time for miss en p, list shoping list... So even after work time every guest is welcomed if. I am still in the kitchen
post #229 of 514

Um, practice exams for what???

 

BTW, you are aware you are posting in a forum restricted to professional chefs, right?
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #230 of 514

Service is going smooth then a backwaiter drops a medium filet plate on a ten top. Nothing more frustrating.

post #231 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamBurgerDavis View Post

Service is going smooth then a backwaiter drops a medium filet plate on a ten top. Nothing more frustrating.

 

Hate this crap! I'll expand on this by saying when service is going well and one person on the line starts going down or a big mistake is made and it starts to sink the whole ship. Service is like a sports game. Momentum is key.
 

post #232 of 514

when a waiter asks you, what is that? regarding something thats been on the menu for 6 months..

 

cocky young 20somethings who think theyve been there and done it all. constantly giving it cocky BULL@%£$ and then falling at the first hurdle. (i was not like that)..

 

anything more than 60 hours a week..

 

cowboys in the kitchen..

 

splitting a hollandaise..

 

when chefs take things out of the fridge and leave it out for hours and hours (stocks, double cream)

 

just a few things that MAKE MY BLOOD BOIL.. Happy cooking

post #233 of 514

Wow, gotta chime in here.

 

I LOVE to cook and have been for 8 years savory and now almost 11 baking, with that being said if it is one thing that has changed that makes it hard to be a Chef is the Food Network and food television in general.  I have gotten requests purely based on a warped perception from watching too much TV.  My favorite request is a caller asking for a cake for 100 people as a sculpture to look like a local ski resort to be delivered in less than a week, during high holiday season, all the while I run a restaurant bakery.  While it is difficult we all have negatives with our jobs but all in all even after training a new baker ever year to 18 months, dealing with a hiring pool that seems to be convinced that they too are Peter Pan, and the lack of pay I am still very thankful that I can do what I have a passion for.     
 

post #234 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahoe Sugarchef View Post

Wow, gotta chime in here.

 

I LOVE to cook and have been for 8 years savory and now almost 11 baking, with that being said if it is one thing that has changed that makes it hard to be a Chef is the Food Network and food television in general.  I have gotten requests purely based on a warped perception from watching too much TV.  My favorite request is a caller asking for a cake for 100 people as a sculpture to look like a local ski resort to be delivered in less than a week, during high holiday season, all the while I run a restaurant bakery.  While it is difficult we all have negatives with our jobs but all in all even after training a new baker ever year to 18 months, dealing with a hiring pool that seems to be convinced that they too are Peter Pan, and the lack of pay I am still very thankful that I can do what I have a passion for.     
 

did you make the cake?

post #235 of 514

The worst part about being a chef is not being able to spend enough time with your family, friends and loved ones due to the work schedule and hours.

 

Everything else is fine with me because it's something I enjoy doing.  Sure there are pet peeves about the job, but I believe every working person no matter how much they love their job, also has things that irritate them.

post #236 of 514

Oh ya...The cake is mine. smile.gif  That one was fun, I made a sauce to go with the cake and then hung out after delivery and cut and served the cake for the client.  She was really jazzed and I love to be able to see the guest response and having a great time.

post #237 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Rhee View Post

The worst part about being a chef is not being able to spend enough time with your family, friends and loved ones due to the work schedule and hours.

Everything else is fine with me because it's something I enjoy doing.  Sure there are pet peeves about the job, but I believe every working person no matter how much they love their job, also has things that irritate them.

I've got to go with this. My chef always has to call his wife and he hates disappointing her... thankfully my girlfriend works swing shift at the IRS so I go in a couple hours before her and we usually get off around the same time. Not seeing her Saturday and only a couple hours Sunday is rough... good thing we're both night owls too
post #238 of 514

If people are being paid for the time it takes them to clean up, then great, they factor that into their working day/hours and you serve whatever customers come in prior to stipulated closing time and then clean up, on the clock, so no problem and everyone should be happy.  But if, as many owners do, you pay your staff only until closing time, and then expect them to work for free to clean up - well, you have just created your own problem.  The last few customers will get poor, rushed service and the establishment will get a rushed, cursory cleaning with many important cleaning and stocking jobs left partly unfinished or badly done.  Basically, the adage that you get what you pay for does not apply only to customers - it is an adage many owners never seem to learn.
 

post #239 of 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatG View Post

If people are being paid for the time it takes them to clean up, then great, they factor that into their working day/hours and you serve whatever customers come in prior to stipulated closing time and then clean up, on the clock, so no problem and everyone should be happy.  But if, as many owners do, you pay your staff only until closing time, and then expect them to work for free to clean up - well, you have just created your own problem.  The last few customers will get poor, rushed service and the establishment will get a rushed, cursory cleaning with many important cleaning and stocking jobs left partly unfinished or badly done.  Basically, the adage that you get what you pay for does not apply only to customers - it is an adage many owners never seem to learn.
 

And this pertains to the topic how???? Maybe it is a subliminal reply that is way subtle.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #240 of 514

In case you missed it, some people complained that the worst thing was having last minute customers.  This was just to say that if last minute customers are a problem for you, then it is most likely because of the way you do things.  Fix those problems, like making sure staff are happy to stay after closing to do the cleanup and do it properly by paying them fairly for the cleanup time and then your last minute customer will no longer be a problem but another opportunity to enjoy the expression on the face of someone who loves your cooking.

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