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Please Pray for Me Because I've Done Something Very Bad

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I live in Chicagoland, home of the BEST hot-dogs on the planet. 

 

Today I wiped out a package of Hebrew National hot-dogs (a very good brand, but not correct). What I did was a bad thing. I slapped them in generic buns, with NO poppy seeds. I wrapped them in paper towels and nuked them in the microwave. I ate them plain. NO bright yellow mustard, NO neon green relish, NO snow-white onions, NO slice of pickle or any sport peppers. NO thin wedges of red tomato. NO celery salt. I ATE THEM PLAIN. Oh My Goodness. I didn't even have the decency to wash them down with a frosty cold beer. I drank Diet Dr. Pepper. 

 

Please, I ask you to pray for my forgiveness from the Hot-Dog Gods before I'm banished to the Culinary Purgatory of Bad Taste. I need your help. Please. I promise to never do this again. I am so very sorry. 

 

Forgive me for I have been bad, 

Chef Francis, the IceMan

 

* (Please be aware, that this post is not any attempt to promote or advertise "Vienna" products. It's just a plea based on my improper eating.)

 

 

navy-pier-dog.jpg

 

History of the Chicago Hot Dog

The "Chicago Style" hot dog got its start from street cart hot dog vendors during the hard times of the Great Depression. Money was scarce, but business was booming for these entrepreneurs who offered a delicious hot meal on a bun for only a nickel. The famous Chicago Style Hot Dog was born! They'd start with a Vienna Beef hot dog, nestle it in a steamed poppyseed bun and cover it with a wonderful combination of toppings: yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt. This unique hot dog creation with a "salad on top" and its memorable interplay of hot and cold, crisp and soft, sharp and smooth, became America's original fast food and a true Chicago institution.


Edited by IceMan - 1/10/11 at 6:18am
post #2 of 24

 A little food trivia.

Hebrew National Hotdogs were born in New York City(Long Island City) developed by Mr Lenny Pines.The company was sold a few times, once to Carolina Rice (Rivianna Foods) till Mr. Pines re-purchased it. Mr. Pines past away.

     One of his managers was a guy named George Bell. He moved to Miami Florida and started National Deli Meats and took the original formula for the frankfurter since it was not patented. The logo and name only  was a reg. trade mark.

     Although not Kosher it can be purchased in Florida and is identical  to  Hebrew National only a lot cheaper. HN today is owned I believe by Conagra Corp.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I live in Chicagoland, home of the BEST hot-dogs on the planet. 

 

 I ate them plain. NO bright yellow mustard, NO neon green relish, NO snow-white onions, NO slice of pickle or any sport peppers. NO thin wedges of red tomato. NO celery salt. I ATE THEM PLAIN.

 

Please, I ask you to pray for my forgiveness from the Hot-Dog Gods before I'm banished to the Culinary Purgatory of Bad Taste. I need your help. Please. I promise to never do this again. I am so very sorry. 

 

Forgive me for I have been bad, 

Chef Francis, the IceMan

 

* (Please be aware, that this post is not any attempt to promote or advertise "Vienna" products. It's just a plea based on my improper eating.)


 

History of the Chicago Hot Dog

The "Chicago Style" hot dog got its start from street cart hot dog vendors during the hard times of the Great Depression. Money was scarce, but business was booming for these entrepreneurs who offered a delicious hot meal on a bun for only a nickel. The famous Chicago Style Hot Dog was born! They'd start with a Vienna Beef hot dog, nestle it in a steamed poppyseed bun and cover it with a wonderful combination of toppings: yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt. This unique hot dog creation with a "salad on top" and its memorable interplay of hot and cold, crisp and soft, sharp and smooth, became America's original fast food and a true Chicago institution.


 

   Hi IceMan!

 

   After reading your post I can't tell if you're joking or not.  So, in order so I don't offend, I'll treat your post as if it's in total seriousness.  Please IceMan, please don't blame yourself for what you did.  Sometimes things happen.  In the whole scheme of things, on a worldly basis, you didn't do anything that was all that bad.  To insinuate that you'll be banished to the Culinary Purgatory of Bad Taste is just absurd!  What are you thinking?  Being banished to Culinary Purgatory for eating an undressed hotdog?  You are over reacting...this would never actually happen.  Get a grip!

 

    Although you will have to leave Chicago immediately!

 

 

 

   We'll miss you in Chicago...now don't let the door hit you in....wink.gif

 

 

 

  just kiddin'...thanks for the chuckle,

 

  dan

post #4 of 24

First Shoeless Joe, now this.  Say it ain't so.

 

BDL

post #5 of 24

What you do, as the Kinsey's said, in the privacy of your own home is your business, IceMan. So certainly you can be forgiven the lack of toppings.

 

But, bun and all in the microwave? OMG! Surely Dante had a level reserved just for that. eek.gif

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

LOL. Please be aware, this is all in jest. As long as you find what I did humorous. Although some hot-dog cart guys in the city would strike me down dead as a blasphemous anti-hotdoger in a split second. As for the Hebrew Nationals, they're a great product. A bit pricey, but very tasty. I bleed CUB BLUE, so Shoeless Joe means little to me. I was going 0-3 which turned out to be 1-4 on the playoff picks I made. I wasn't in a right frame of mind at the time. And yeah, bun and all in the microwave. Depending on power, 30 seconds to 1 minute and it's all good, believe it or not. All in all, at least I did not do the most unholy of all hot-dog crimes; ketchup will never go on one of mine.

post #7 of 24

but ketchup and mayo on a kaiser is the best way to enjoy a hot dog!

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #8 of 24

don't know why this came to mind, but i am reminded of the gary larson catoon...a cafeteria scene in hell with people at long tables eating sandwiches...satan at the door saying to someone in line "you're new here, aincha kid? on somedays the sandwiches contain scorpions...not every day, but some days...that's why they call it hell, kid.  maybe your purgatory connection is a chicago red with toppings allowed only on certain days, or not at all! 

joey

as a side note, the place i live in colorado(durango), the ski mountain is called Purgatory, but everyone just calls it Purg..all the ski runs have names from dantes inferno...styx,hades, no mercy, angels tread, pathway to peace etc......

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 

LOL. You're killing me here. 

 

OK. Three(3) words that get you into "Hot-Dog-Hell" are: "ketchup, mayo, kaiser"

 

"kaiser"? Are you kidding? I went off the reservation with the whole situation, but at least I used a real hot-dog bun. 

~ "A steamed poppyseed bun", preferably Rosen's, is the only acceptable choice.

 

"ketchup"? I guess you've never been to Chicago. (Not Chicago, but you get the point.)

 

"mayo"? Forget it. Nope. Unholy. Even the "ketchup geeks" will carve your heart out with a plastic spork if you even think about putting mayo on a "Chicago Dog".

260px-Spork.jpg   the "spork"

 

 

 

post #10 of 24

All that is true, IceMan.

 

But what's also true is that there are good reasons why the Chicago style dog never spread beyond northeastern Illinois. Same can be said about many Windy City specialties; hot dogs, deep dish, a host of others. If they're as good as Chicagoans claim, how come they remain local? They're certainly not secrets---Chicagoans take great pains to tout them to the world. But, apparently, the world isn't listening.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 24

I'm just teasing you, but i never use a seeded bun. Caspers Hot Dogs (in the Oakland/San Francisco area) is the best chicago style dog that California has. foot long, natural casings for that snap, pickle spears, tomatoes, onions but no seeded bun and while peppers are available I don't think I have ever put them on my hot dog.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #12 of 24

This is going to sound strange, I know. But my favorite way to enjoy a hot dog is grill and topped with red beans and rice. Not sure how I got introduced to that, but it's the best.

 

All that aside, as far as I'm concerned, Iceman, there's not wrong way to eat a hot dog. A plain hot dog is better than no hot dog.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #13 of 24

Nope.

 

I'll only say a prayer for you when you batter and deep fry a Mars bar..........................

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

The world is filled with sinners, heathens and blasphemers too. You all just need to see the light.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

All that is true, IceMan. .......... But, apparently, the world isn't listening.



LOL tylerm713. I can actually accept that variation; in the culinary neighborhood of "beannie-weenie" (franks & beans). With all due respect.

post #15 of 24

 Thanks for the laugh you guys! 

 

I'm probably the worst blasphemer (is that a word?) when it comes to hot dogs.  The ones I like the best come from the grocery store... Schneider's (I think) red hots.  Broiled on a wonder bread bun with ketchup mustard and relish.  MMM..

 

I also don't mind the ones that the vendors around here sell, but I don't have them very often.

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #16 of 24

Uhhhh... I had a "mind altering" experience in my childhood.  As a cub-scout our troop visited a local meat packing plant in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan).  This particluar plant had a reputation for making a lot of hotdogs for many brand names.  I'll never get the image out of my head of those two, uh, gentlemen in white  hip-waders shoveling stuff with s/s shovels into the gaping maw of a huuuuge meat grinder.

 

Yep, scarred for life when it comnes to hot dogs.... 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #17 of 24

 I know about the gunk that goes into hotdogs but every now and then I have to have one.  The Aarogant Worms said it perfectly in their hotdog song.. it's the "particle board of meat"

 

My son had a hotdog experience when he was in Beavers.  They went to a Beaveree at the TO zoo and the lunch was hotdogs.  He ate three hotdogs and then his leaders cut him off so the little stinker went to another colony's leader and asked them for a hotdog and of course they gave it to him not knowing how much he had already eaten.  He had two more and a lollipop in the van on the way home and when he came home his stomach was killing him.  I had to put him to bed with a bucket (just in case.. he never needed it) so he could sleep it off.  He has never done that since but still likes hot dogs now and then!

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #18 of 24

Ahhhh....

Well, next time you go  to IKEA ,make sure he doesn't have more than a loonie in his pocket.  If he does, you'll find him at the food stand, wolfing down those 50 cent weenies.

 

DAMHIKT................

Mine's 12 now.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #19 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I live in Chicagoland, home of the BEST hot-dogs on the planet. 

 

Today I wiped out a package of Hebrew National hot-dogs (a very good brand, but not correct). What I did was a bad thing. I slapped them in generic buns, with NO poppy seeds. I wrapped them in paper towels and nuked them in the microwave. I ate them plain. NO bright yellow mustard, NO neon green relish, NO snow-white onions, NO slice of pickle or any sport peppers. NO thin wedges of red tomato. NO celery salt. I ATE THEM PLAIN. Oh My Goodness. I didn't even have the decency to wash them down with a frosty cold beer. I drank Diet Dr. Pepper. 

 

Please, I ask you to pray for my forgiveness from the Hot-Dog Gods before I'm banished to the Culinary Purgatory of Bad Taste. I need your help. Please. I promise to never do this again. I am so very sorry. 

 

Forgive me for I have been bad, 

Chef Francis, the IceMan

 

* (Please be aware, that this post is not any attempt to promote or advertise "Vienna" products. It's just a plea based on my improper eating.)

 

 

navy-pier-dog.jpg

 

History of the Chicago Hot Dog

The "Chicago Style" hot dog got its start from street cart hot dog vendors during the hard times of the Great Depression. Money was scarce, but business was booming for these entrepreneurs who offered a delicious hot meal on a bun for only a nickel. The famous Chicago Style Hot Dog was born! They'd start with a Vienna Beef hot dog, nestle it in a steamed poppyseed bun and cover it with a wonderful combination of toppings: yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt. This unique hot dog creation with a "salad on top" and its memorable interplay of hot and cold, crisp and soft, sharp and smooth, became America's original fast food and a true Chicago institution.


Chicago suburb native myself....you are right about the best hot dogs!

 

Love the Navy pier hot dog!  :D

post #20 of 24

you all need to cross over to my side of the tracks and try a 'sonoran hot dog'. you haven't really lived a full life until you've eaten one of these 'puppies'...truly.....how they get everything on one bun is beyond me, but they do, and they do it with smiles and laughter...maybe they're just laughing cuz we're 'gringos', who knows!....AVISO: not for the faint of heart!

bolillo bun, either toasted or steamed...hot dog wrapped in bacon and cooked on flat top, in the bun is refried beans, jalapeno sauce, queso, avacado, tomatoes, onions, a mayo/tabasco/lime sauce squirted on the top...served with a roasted chile on the side.....now your'e talking about a serious dog....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #21 of 24

LOL I have a packet of the extra long Hebrews...however, I will not eat the whole package and I WILL use bright yellow mustard and enjoy every bite! I like them filleted and fried. Having said all that, I use a Little Black Book-Daily Food Diary to track everything I eat and drink...weight loss going extremely well and 'dogs' are allowed as long as I track them and use portion control and calorie counting while staying within the limits of my daily calorie ration! Works great and I eat very well...tomorrow is another day. Sinner repent and get over it, move on to the next great day which is full of potential to be different!

post #22 of 24

I live in Chicago and I think that on top of all the hot dog wrongs you committed you did not go to Hot Doug's for a proper hot dog. At least you ate them plain man. If you would of posted you slathered them with ketchup I would of had to ban you from the forums....

 

peace.gif

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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #23 of 24
This forum is, for the most part, forgiving. We can let your transgressions slide this time. Unless of course, you enjoy football and are a Packers fan.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

This forum is, for the most part, forgiving. We can let your transgressions slide this time. Unless of course, you enjoy football and are a Packers fan.



lol.gif

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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