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In over my head...

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

WOW. I didn't know $h*t about knives. Thank you BDL for setting the record straight.

 

After talking with someone over at JKD, "Santa" got me an Echizen Japan sujihiki. Any effort to write a review of this knife would probably just sound like a kid talking about the first time he got laid... So I'll spare you.

 

Only problem... this knife (like my first girlfriend) is out of my league! Outside of basic, obvious, knife care, how do I care for it best? Is this a knife that should be honed between applications?

post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 

Also, there is no one around here that can sharpen a knife of this quality. With the seemingly ample time that I will have before this knife needs to be sharpened, should I invest in and practice (on old knives) with the EdgePro system or is it better to learn to freehand?

post #3 of 8

I always recommend to learn to sharpen freehand, that way when you learn the skill and get it down to where you put the edge you need you can do it without having to turn to anybody else when no one is around. Learning to care for your knives properly will help you keep them around much longer in the quality and shap they need to be in. As a fan of japanese knives I always keep a wetstone and diamond steel around to care for mine.

post #4 of 8

Disagree with that one.

Can't sharpen "freehand" untill you know what a bevel is, and how to achieve a 15 or 20 degree angle bevel in the first place.  Some form of a jig is needed until you actually have the motor skills to do this.

 

Diamond "steels" are an abrasive, and you'll round over your bevel in no time flat.  I've known many to wear a "hollow" in the middle of the blade with diamond steels, making it impossible to completly cut through anything.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Disagree with that one.

Can't sharpen "freehand" untill you know what a bevel is, and how to achieve a 15 or 20 degree angle bevel in the first place.  Some form of a jig is needed until you actually have the motor skills to do this.


While a jig might be useful, I disagree. I just began sharpening freehand and, with a few calculations and careful (slow) movements, I've managed to bring four of my cheap old knives down to 15 degree bevels. Side note: sharpening is fun.

post #6 of 8

sharpening is a great way to zone out.  i got a whetstone that has 3 sides...even comes with a little plastic thing to set your angle right until you get the hang of it.  found it on amazon.  tennessee something....

 

when i get stressed and need to decompress...i sharpen my knives. 

post #7 of 8

Sharpening is fun, and doubly so on the Edge Pro.  There's no down side to this particular jig, at least none that are insurmountable to someone with intelligence and common sense.  It will teach you a lot about sharpening, things that you can easily transfer to sharpening freehand.  An EP, combined with the aftermarket Naniwa & Shapton stones, will allow you to craft an incredible edge with a relatively short learning curve.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Edge Pro is the $h*t.

 

Phaedrus, why the aftermarket stones? The one's included with the kit seem to be quite effective.

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