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Math Help Please

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I have a new food item being used and it calls for egg whites to be added at 30% of the total volume.

The liquid egg bags I have are 5 gal/20# bags. The egg whites are 2#/ 1 qt containers.

So how much egg white do I add to a whole bag of easy eggs to achieve 30% of the volume? And what would the formula be to figure this out for the future..

Thanks Chefs! I always appreciate your help!

Frizbee 

Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
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Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
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post #2 of 9

5 gallon x 30/100 = 1.5 gallons or 6 qts.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Awesome Kuan! Thanks

Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #4 of 9

Something seems strange, from the sources I've found, 4 cups (1 quart) of liquid whole eggs weighs about 34.286 ounces or 2 pounds 2 1/4 ounces. Therefore, 5 gallons (20 quarts) would weigh about 42 pounds 13 3/4 ounces, not 20 pounds as you indicate, maybe it is 20 kilograms? The weight of egg whites seems very close.

 

Total volume = V
Volume of liquid eggs = L
Volume of egg white = W

If the recipe calls for 30% of the TOTAL VOLUME to be egg whites, then V = L + W and  %W =( W/V)*100 = (W/(L+W))*100 = 30%

So, dividing both sides by 100 : W/(L+W) = 0.3

Multiplying both sides by (L+W): W=0.3(L+W) = 0.3L+0.3W

Subtracting 0.3W from both sides : W-0.3W = 0.3L or  0.7W=0.3L

Dividing both sides by 0.3: 0.7W/0.3=0.3L/0.3 or 2.3333W=L

Dividing both sides by 2.3333: W = 0.42857755L

What the h3ll does this mean? For every 5 gallon (20 quarts) bag of liquid eggs, use 8.57155 quarts (8 quarts, 18.29 ounces) of egg whites or 8 quarts + 2 cups + 2 ounces + 1 teaspoon + 3/4 teaspoon of egg whites.

8.57155 quarts of egg whites divided by the total volume of 28.57155 quarts = 0.30 = 30%
I'd probably use 8 1/2 quarts of whites per 5 gallons of liquid eggs.

I'd certainly check the weight of 5 gallons of liquid eggs before proceeding.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 9

The OP said it was 30% of the Total volume, not 30% of the volume of liquid eggs.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

5 gallon x 30/100 = 1.5 gallons or 6 qts.


If it is really 30$ of the liquid egg volume, KUAN is correct.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 9

The original answer didn't state whether it was to liquid eggs or not, so you could still use the formula either way you desire. Add 1.5 gallon white to 5 gallon liquid egg; or add 1.5 gallon white to 3.5 gallon liquid egg to equal 5 gallon. While the results will be decidedly different, the formula is still correct.

 

I am going to go out on a limb here and suggest that the answer to the original question would be 6 bags of whites to 1 bag of liquid egg. My logic on that answer is that the resulting product use is complete with no leftover partials.


Edited by cheflayne - 1/11/11 at 10:15am
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 9

Oh OK.  The other scenario is the liquid eggs represents 70% of the total volume and the eggwhites reprents 30%.  So the ratio is 3:7.

 

So 5 gallons divide by 7 and multiply by 3

 

In short (5/7)x3=2.14 gallons of eggwhite.

 

But I agree with cheflayne.  It seems the easiest.

post #8 of 9

Hm, (5/7)*3 = 0.714285*3 = 2.142857 gallons*4 = 8.57142857  crazy.gif, pretty close, no?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

Hm, (5/7)*3 = 0.714285*3 = 2.142857 gallons*4 = 8.57142857  crazy.gif, pretty close, no?



Heh yeah  lol.gif

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