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As if the Food Network wasn't enough of a joke already!

post #1 of 113
Thread Starter 

I saw this link and had to post it. When I first saw it yesterday afternoon there were 56 posts. As of last night there were 97. I have not looked since. Check out the recipe and then the responses. There are some pretty humorous people out there!

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/english-peas-recipe/index.html

My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #2 of 113

wow, that is one sad recipe.I can't beleive anyone actually bothered to post that.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #3 of 113

I think this comment is the winner:

 

"You need to be clearer in your recipes. I melted the butter with a small amount of pot (about two joints' worth in the microwave then added the peas. Since I only cooked until the peas were warm the marijuana was still basically raw. The stems made it really unpleasant.

Perhaps in the future you could substitute "saucepan" for "pot". It's confusing."

 

Classic.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #4 of 113

 That's a pretty pitiful recipe.. I love the comments though!

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #5 of 113
post #6 of 113

This recipe (the peas) has been all over the news today, therefor the big number of comments in a short space.

 

Now maybe just take it easy a bit and try to give it a little rhythm. Is it all possible that a recipe like this is just there to show how simple a dish might be? A simple dish with no complications at all, just heat it up and serve it. 

 

On the other topic, Sandra Lee's recipe is fantastic. That's right, go ahead and tell me that you've never taken a finger full of frosting off a fresh-baked cake?!? You're a liar if you do. You've never had divinity? It's a simple desert tasty for sugar junkies. Quick and easy, with some flavor. 

 

For all anyone wants to rag, complain and disrespect these two women, just remember ............... they both have TV shows, you don't. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #7 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

For all anyone wants to rag, complain and disrespect these two women, just remember ............... they both have TV shows, you don't. 



So since Sandra Lee has a TV show, she is a better chef than Thomas Keller?

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #8 of 113

NO, not at all. Since she has a TV show she is more successful THAN YOU. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerm713 View Post

So since Sandra Lee has a TV show, she is a better chef than Thomas Keller?

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #9 of 113

Iceman, I won't argue that point. But I think it begs the question: more successful at what? Do you really regard her as someone reputable in the culinary world? Do you consider her a bastion of American cuisine?

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #10 of 113

I consider her a "Celebrity Chef", w/ a TV show, that makes a lot of money. "Bastion of American cuisine"? NO, but I don't consider Keller one either. Have you ever eaten at the French Laundry, Per Se, Ad Hoc or Bouchon? They are not places for regular, blue-collar, lunch-bucket working stiffs. ME. Tonight I was taken to dinner by two very close friends. Neither of them has ever been to Red Lobster.  That is where we went. Tuesday night, really crummy Chicagoland weather, 70% booked @ 8:30. I'm positive that FL is 100% booked, like it is every night. I'll be willing to bet that if you asked 100 people on the street in downtown wherever you live, 3 or less have heard of FL but over 80% know of Red Lobster. Bastions of American cuisine for me are those chefs that get bumped off Top Chef, go home and continue to work, busting their butts to build a great place. Many of those goofy places on Diners Drive-Ins and Dives is where I like to go to eat. I've worked in those kinda places. That's America. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #11 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I consider her a "Celebrity Chef", w/ a TV show, that makes a lot of money. "Bastion of American cuisine"? NO, but I don't consider Keller one either. Have you ever eaten at the French Laundry, Per Se, Ad Hoc or Bouchon? They are not places for regular, blue-collar, lunch-bucket working stiffs. ME. Tonight I was taken to dinner by two very close friends. Neither of them has ever been to Red Lobster.  That is where we went. Tuesday night, really crummy Chicagoland weather, 70% booked @ 8:30. I'm positive that FL is 100% booked, like it is every night. I'll be willing to bet that if you asked 100 people on the street in downtown wherever you live, 3 or less have heard of FL but over 80% know of Red Lobster. Bastions of American cuisine for me are those chefs that get bumped off Top Chef, go home and continue to work, busting their butts to build a great place. Many of those goofy places on Diners Drive-Ins and Dives is where I like to go to eat. I've worked in those kinda places. That's America. 


Is that your personal goal as a chef?  To head a Red Lobster?  To cook mediocre food for people who don't know any better?  You know what Sandra Lee is successful at?  Being a TV personality, and using that to propel her into other markets.  She's not successful as a cook, or as someone looking to inspire others with their cuisine.  She's not teaching, she's not building, she's not bettering.  She's just making money in a way that happens to be related to food.

 

People may not know some of the top chefs in America, or some of the unsung heros of truly unique and delicious cuisine, but make no mistake that those people ARE accomplished and deserving of respect and admiration in their field.  How on earth are people going to know better than Red Lobster and Kwaanza Cake if that's all they're ever exposed to?  Honey, Red Lobster isn't "America".  It's ignorance of mediocrity.

post #12 of 113

Ok, OK, sort of off topic, but I feel the need to stick up for TK.  Coincidentally, I had breakfast at Bouchon this morning.  I have relatives in town and it is a favorite with me on such occasions.  You really don't need to be a food snob to appreciate this cuisine.  Perfectly cooked eggs with Lyonnaise potatoes, the toast was brioche (housemade), of course and the croissants were flaky and filled with the flavor of quality butter.  Even if you have never eaten at Red Lobster, I think you could enjoy that.

 

Oh, and Chrose, thanks for the link, I got quite a laugh and had to share it with friends.

post #13 of 113
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

NO, not at all. Since she has a TV show she is more successful THAN YOU.
 

 

Only in that she's more successful at having a TV show than me.

post #14 of 113

Sure she is a success, she has a low neckline on her blouse and is attractive, That Sells. Maybe if Kuan stood there with his pants down he would have a TV show also.

     Get Real Iceman, I feel you cannot possibly take your profession serious if you call these people chefs. Possibly to the layman or the housewives or the young marrieds who don't or can't cook. I think they are a disgrace to our profession when you and others refer to them as Chefs.

     Also if Red Lobster is your idea of dining, then I can appreciate some of your comments. To me Red Lobster is nothing more then slightly upgraded fast counter food served at a table at a slightly elevated fast food price.

    I ate there  once, the rolls were good. thats all I can say. It's a good place for a young guy to take a cheap date.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #15 of 113

I don't think Iceman thinks so, but like it or not many of these places represent middle America.  Denny's, Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Perkin's, etc.  That's what he's trying to say.

post #16 of 113

Something else IceMan either ignores or is unaware of. Y'all remember The Devil Wears Prada? That wonderful scene where Meryl Streep goes through this litany of how and why the blue, discount-house blouse being worn by her soon to be assistant originated as a high-fashion statement by a top designer two years before.

 

It's the same in our world. Casual dining restaurants are a trailing indicator of what the real top chefs of America have been doing the past few years.

 

Complicating it further is that the Midwest is, itself, a trailing indicator. Whether the world of food, or fashion, or much else, there is a two-year gap between what becomes popular on the coasts and when it hits the charts in the Midwest. That's not a value judgement, btw, just an observation.

 

So, returning it home, it might be four or five years after the Kellers, and Andres', and Riparts do something that it trickles down. But eventually it does; in a diluted, barely recognizable, blue, discount-house sort of way.

 

So, if Red Lobster and Olive Garden and the like are IceMan's preferences, that's fine. But he needs to keep in mind where their inspiration comes from.

 

And of course, as he made plain on the other thread, he is impressed with Sandra and Giada and etc. not because of their cookery skills, but because of their mammary displays---which, of course, is one of FNs main criteria for female stars in the first place.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer 

 

And of course, as he made plain on the other thread, he is impressed with Sandra and Giada and etc. not because of their cookery skills, but because of their mammary displays---which, of course, is one of FNs main criteria for female stars in the first place.



I'll ignore that.  But Garrett and Giada are friends.  I don't think he appreciates comments like that.

 

HAIwT.jpg

post #18 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I consider her a "Celebrity Chef", w/ a TV show, that makes a lot of money. "Bastion of American cuisine"? NO, but I don't consider Keller one either. Have you ever eaten at the French Laundry, Per Se, Ad Hoc or Bouchon? They are not places for regular, blue-collar, lunch-bucket working stiffs. ME. Tonight I was taken to dinner by two very close friends. Neither of them has ever been to Red Lobster.  That is where we went. Tuesday night, really crummy Chicagoland weather, 70% booked @ 8:30. I'm positive that FL is 100% booked, like it is every night. I'll be willing to bet that if you asked 100 people on the street in downtown wherever you live, 3 or less have heard of FL but over 80% know of Red Lobster. Bastions of American cuisine for me are those chefs that get bumped off Top Chef, go home and continue to work, busting their butts to build a great place. Many of those goofy places on Diners Drive-Ins and Dives is where I like to go to eat. I've worked in those kinda places. That's America. 



Celebrity? Yes.

 

Chef? No. Not at all. Not even close.

 

I can't possibly see how you respect someone that insist on telling Americans that mediocrity is the goal of cooking. She doesn't try to hide it; she knows her food sucks. But she also knows there are enough people out there like you that will drink it up and come out the other side thinking she's a genius for opening a can of beans and pouring melted Velveeta all over it. She preaches to unsuspecting housewives the virtues of preservative laden processed foods, mixes them with other inferior ingredients, and demonstrates no respect for the culinary arts. I'm no chef, mind you, but I know one when I see one, and I know when I see a crock of $h*t. 

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #19 of 113

Forget all the food network cra*, mainly because I don't watch it, never really have, and can't relate to it. 

 

But If you read Icemans's post, he's not saying he wants every place to be a Red Lobster, he saying, "Bastions of American Cuisine are those Chefs who get bumped off "Top Chef", go home and bust thier butts to make a great place".

 

Face it, not everyone can afford to eat at really nice place all the time, once or twice a year maybe. 

 

Good food is good food, and it starts with good ingredients, good technique, and good presentation.  Honesty always shows up in good food, and when it doesn't, it shows too.  

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #20 of 113


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

This recipe (the peas) has been all over the news today, therefor the big number of comments in a short space.

 

Now maybe just take it easy a bit and try to give it a little rhythm. Is it all possible that a recipe like this is just there to show how simple a dish might be? A simple dish with no complications at all, just heat it up and serve it. 

 

On the other topic, Sandra Lee's recipe is fantastic. That's right, go ahead and tell me that you've never taken a finger full of frosting off a fresh-baked cake?!? You're a liar if you do. You've never had divinity? It's a simple desert tasty for sugar junkies. Quick and easy, with some flavor. 

 

For all anyone wants to rag, complain and disrespect these two women, just remember ............... they both have TV shows, you don't. 



Take it easy? On a recipe that is about opening a can and melting butter? Not much to get upset about except it's a sad recipe. Honestly, did it even need to be posted? Steamed green beans  is just as easy and tastier. Of course this should be ridiculed. It's the equivalent of a Shakespearean actor coming out and saying "uh..To be or not to...uh... whatever".  and then farting on stage. If you like Paula Dean, fine. Doesn't bother me one bit, but I can see no defense for this "phoned in performance" of a recipe, it's just sad.

 

As far as that finger full of frosting off a fresh baked cake? you darn skippy! I took two fingers of it and then ate some CAKE. If you want to eat spoon fulls of frosting out of a jar, go for it. Put on the chick flick and pj's, get on the couch and eat away..I've done it. But I'll never fool myself into believing that I should dollop it on a plate and dust it with cocoa and try and pass that off as a good dessert.

 

Disrespect? maybe. Ragging? no, I don't think so. Criticizing as a professional some recipes that are sad, unhealthy, lack imagination and utilize over processed foods, YES!

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #21 of 113

LOL. WOW. I can't wait to get home to answer all of this. Some of you are on with your replies. Some miss widely. Thank You kuan for catching one of my points.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #22 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Forget all the food network cra*, mainly because I don't watch it, never really have, and can't relate to it. 

 

But If you read Icemans's post, he's not saying he wants every place to be a Red Lobster, he saying, "Bastions of American Cuisine are those Chefs who get bumped off "Top Chef", go home and bust thier butts to make a great place".

 

Face it, not everyone can afford to eat at really nice place all the time, once or twice a year maybe. 

 

Good food is good food, and it starts with good ingredients, good technique, and good presentation.  Honesty always shows up in good food, and when it doesn't, it shows too.  


I like cheap good food as well but try to eat at places that are  A. locally owned and B. do good home cooking. I have defended places shown on Diners, Drive-in and Dives and Man vs food. Not because it's haute cuisine by any means but because the food was honest (if a bit over portionedbiggrin.gif). I like one of my local eats breakfast scramble, home fried potatoes, cheese, peppers, bacon, sausage and scrambled eggs all piled high on a plate. I can get sour cream and salsa or home gravy poured over it if I ask. fancy? nope. delicious and hearty? oh yeah!

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #23 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post


 


 It's the equivalent of a Shakespearean actor coming out and saying "uh..To be or not to...uh... whatever".  and then farting on stage.

 



I don't know that just strikes me as funny as hell!!

 

I laugh everytime I read it!

My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #24 of 113

IMHO, there are certain categories of places that sell food ready for eating:

  • Feeding stations, i.e. convenience markets, fast food, casual chains, take and go, institutional food service, mainly prepackaged or food assembly. Key is SPEED
  • Eating establishments, i.e. coffee shops, diners, more than likely actual cooking takes place, key is QUANTITY
  • Dining establishments, i.e. independent restaurants, restaurant groups, minimal "food assembly", more scratch cooking, dining is an experience as well as food. Key is QUALITY

 

Each has its place and purpose.

 

TAWTHDIK

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #25 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrose View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post


 


 It's the equivalent of a Shakespearean actor coming out and saying "uh..To be or not to...uh... whatever".  and then farting on stage.

 



I don't know that just strikes me as funny as hell!!

 

I laugh everytime I read it!



Sounds like something Mark Twain dreamed up in "Adventures of Huck Finn...

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #26 of 113

I don't do fancy, I do good. I don't do Red Lobster because I don't like microwaved food full of salt and preservatives. And I hate sea food. But I will do the dinner down the street from my house where the fanciest thing they do is the rack of lamb dinner special on Tuesdays.

 

If it don't taste good, it ain't worth eating. If it's gone in two bites, it's too small for eating. If the somebody who made my dinner is having a hissy about my lack of appreciation for their "training and skills" then they outta take the fancy education and go build lacquered food art for a gallery somewhere.

 

Seriously. In America we are SO RICH that our poor people are FAT. We're so stinking filthy rich that our poorest citizens overeat on processed junk sold to them by Sandra Lee on the Food Network. We are so damned disgustingly morbidly rich that there are tens of thousands of Chefs prepared and trained by highly competitive "Culinary Arts" schools all over the country and very few of them are having a hard time getting a job. Our commercials for food are down right pornographic and people get into arguments on internet forums about whether Red Lobster is an "insult" to cooking and mock the oversimplified recipes offered by a television personality on a network devoted to the cooking and preparation of food! Red Lobster, fancy pants chefs and Food Network are all pieces in the same puzzle, folks. Squabbling about which section of the puzzle is the most offensive is pretty asinine.

 

'Cause when it's boiled down to the basics, cooking is about keeping people fed so they don't starve to death, and it doesn't take a whole hell of a lot to accomplish that. Be grateful you all live in the part of the world where the preparation and serving of food can be such a Big Fat Deal(tm).

post #27 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Sure she is a success, she has a low neckline on her blouse and is attractive, That Sells. Maybe if Kuan stood there with his pants down he would have a TV show also.



Thanks for the laugh.  :)

post #28 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

I like cheap good food as well but try to eat at places that are  A. locally owned and B. do good home cooking. I have defended places shown on Diners, Drive-in and Dives and Man vs food. Not because it's haute cuisine by any means but because the food was honest (if a bit over portionedbiggrin.gif). I like one of my local eats breakfast scramble, home fried potatoes, cheese, peppers, bacon, sausage and scrambled eggs all piled high on a plate. I can get sour cream and salsa or home gravy poured over it if I ask. fancy? nope. delicious and hearty? oh yeah!


I think that's the point.  That there is a world of difference between humble, but good, food and the drek that is Red Lobster and the Olive Garden.  One isn't a food snob to point out that microwaved instant mashed potatoes or opening cans isn't "good food".

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post

Seriously. In America we are SO RICH that our poor people are FAT. We're so stinking filthy rich that our poorest citizens overeat on processed junk sold to them by Sandra Lee on the Food Network.

 

We are so damned disgustingly morbidly rich that there are tens of thousands of Chefs prepared and trained by highly competitive "Culinary Arts" schools all over the country and very few of them are having a hard time getting a job. 



I'm going to have to quibble with these two points.  It is actually the poorest demographics which record the greatest percentage of obesity.  In my hometown (NYC), it is the areas where people don't have access to grocery stores within walking distance, and instead must buy from convenience stores, that have record highs of obesity.  It's the people on welfare, in slums, the uneducated and unemployed, which are startlingly overweight - because packaged food is cheaper than buying wholesome ingredients.  Consider that you can get a hamburger, fries, and a sundae at McD's for $3.  How much does it cost to make pasta primavera with chicken?  An omelette with real veg and fresh herbs?  Contrast the price of American "cheese" with the cost of any other cheese.  WonderBread vs. a sprout or whole grain.  Couple that with a lack of education and a lack of role modeling, and is it any wonder they're obese?

 

Also, many culinary students leave school and struggle to obtain even a normally decent job.  They dump tens of thousands of dollars into their education, and then land a $10/hr line cook job, if they're lucky.  I don't know where you got your intel on culinary graduates, but it's off.

post #29 of 113

Shavy, you managed to utterly miss my point.

 

I was talking about extreme overabundance in this country and how it allows ridiculous arguments about what "real cooking" is to exist. How you took that as a chance to go off about McDonald's versus organic food, I haven't the foggiest idea.

 

Secondly, ten dollars an hour is still ten dollars an hour. It's a job which pays. I know many a college graduate living at home with their parents because the two year plus job search still isn't panning out. Recent culinary school graduates are in an industry that is experiencing growth when many others in this nation have come to a grinding halt or have even started to shrink. If you disagree, take it up with the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

 

"Employment of chefs, head cooks, and food preparation and serving supervisors is expected to increase by 6 percent over the 2008-18 decade, which is more slowly than the average for all occupations. Growth will be generated by increases in population, a growing variety of dining venues, and continued demand for convenience. As more people opt for the time-saving ease of letting others do the cooking, the need for workers to oversee food preparation and serving will increase."

 

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos330.htm

post #30 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post

 

Seriously. In America we are SO RICH that our poor people are FAT. We're so stinking filthy rich that our poorest citizens overeat on processed junk sold to them by Sandra Lee on the Food Network. We are so damned disgustingly morbidly rich that there are tens of thousands of Chefs prepared and trained by highly competitive "Culinary Arts" schools all over the country and very few of them are having a hard time getting a job. Our commercials for food are down right pornographic and people get into arguments on internet forums about whether Red Lobster is an "insult" to cooking and mock the oversimplified recipes offered by a television personality on a network devoted to the cooking and preparation of food! Red Lobster, fancy pants chefs and Food Network are all pieces in the same puzzle, folks. Squabbling about which section of the puzzle is the most offensive is pretty asinine.

 

'Cause when it's boiled down to the basics, cooking is about keeping people fed so they don't starve to death, and it doesn't take a whole hell of a lot to accomplish that. Be grateful you all live in the part of the world where the preparation and serving of food can be such a Big Fat Deal(tm).


      How much do you think Americans should earn per year?  How much do you think Americans should weigh?  What should Americans do with any money you call extra?

 

  You seem very resentful of Americans. 

 

   I hope you take care,

  dan

 

 

 

  

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