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As if the Food Network wasn't enough of a joke already! - Page 2

post #31 of 113

I don't want to get in the middle of that argument, Mommamae. But your quote from the BLS doesn't support your contention. You're seeing the 6% growth figure, but missing the key point: which is more slowly than the average for all occupations. In other words, according to your own provided stats, jobs in the culinary industry are growing more slowly than the job market overall.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #32 of 113

Statistics fail, IYAM.

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #33 of 113

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerm713 View Post

Statistics fail, IYAM.

 

   You are what?
 

post #34 of 113

Oh wow. I've never been misunderstood so drastically by so many people this quickly before. It's like a personal record or something... Anyway, the rest of you can take care and have fun debating this all you want, I'm bowing out and getting back to the real world where common sense and English syntax actually count for something. Cheers!

 

Oh, and the original point of this post... those comments are priceless. Absolutely the bitchiest remarks I have ever read before. I've never seen a group of people get that rabid over a simple how-to recipe before. But that's what the internet is for, right? Haha!

post #35 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post
...I've never seen a group of people get that rabid over a simple how-to recipe before. But that's what the internet is for, right? Haha!

You're right, that recipe belongs on a can of English Peas.

 

But I would not put my name on such a recipe, nor would offer it on a video, TV program, or anything more than a passing comment or answer to a simple question.
 

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #36 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonefishin View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post

 

Seriously. In America we are SO RICH that our poor people are FAT. We're so stinking filthy rich that our poorest citizens overeat on processed junk sold to them by Sandra Lee on the Food Network. We are so damned disgustingly morbidly rich that there are tens of thousands of Chefs prepared and trained by highly competitive "Culinary Arts" schools all over the country and very few of them are having a hard time getting a job. Our commercials for food are down right pornographic and people get into arguments on internet forums about whether Red Lobster is an "insult" to cooking and mock the oversimplified recipes offered by a television personality on a network devoted to the cooking and preparation of food! Red Lobster, fancy pants chefs and Food Network are all pieces in the same puzzle, folks. Squabbling about which section of the puzzle is the most offensive is pretty asinine.

 

'Cause when it's boiled down to the basics, cooking is about keeping people fed so they don't starve to death, and it doesn't take a whole hell of a lot to accomplish that. Be grateful you all live in the part of the world where the preparation and serving of food can be such a Big Fat Deal(tm).


      How much do you think Americans should earn per year?  How much do you think Americans should weigh?  What should Americans do with any money you call extra?

 

  You seem very resentful of Americans. 

 

   I hope you take care,

  dan

 

 

 

  


I read it, I'm American, born here and everything.  I think that what she said is "spot on".  Americans ARE fat.  Our poor eat incredibly well compared to the poor in other countries.  We have one of the highest standards of living in the world.  I don't see where she resents us, she just "calls it like she sees it".  It's not about how much she thinks we should earn, weigh, or do with our extra money, she's simply stating facts that we do earn nice livings, we are (as a country) obese, and we do have more than most of the world. 

post #37 of 113

Wow, I didn't think mentioning Sandra Lee would cause such a stir! eek.gif

 

I would really hate to think that Sandra Lee's cooking is looked at as the same as average American, blue collar cooking. Just because folks don't have a lot of money, that doesn't mean that all they can do is put processed food together. I've watched some of her shows and what really annoyed me is that she could have easily used fresh ingredients to make some of the recipes, without having to spend more money or time. Nor would it make the recipes any harder. Yet, she, or the FN, chose to use processed ingredients.

 

No, I actually have NEVER eaten frosting off of a cake. I hate frosting, even as a kid. And even if I do like frosting, I would never add powder sugar, roll them into balls and tell people they are chocolate truffles.

 

I really don't get Red Lobster. Same with Outback, Olive Garden and the such. Frankly, all the food are pretty bad. AND, they are pricey! For the same price, I can get several meals at some local joints that actually serve good food.

post #38 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post
Oh, and the original point of this post... those comments are priceless. Absolutely the bitchiest remarks I have ever read before. I've never seen a group of people get that rabid over a simple how-to recipe before. But that's what the internet is for, right? Haha!


Here's where I disagree with you wholeheartedly.  My mother (and school) served canned English peas and canned asparagus.  It wasn't until I was near 30 years old that I would touch either item again.  Their fresh (or even flash-frozen in the case of peas) versions are NOTHING like their canned versions.  Butter can fix lots of things, but not waterlogged English peas.  If it were a recipe for whole kernel corn, everything else the same (can and butter), it would be truly simplistic, but not disgusting.  You can doctor up a good number of canned veggies, but English peas are NOT something that should be canned.  Try some canned asparagus one time and you will understand my disgust. 

post #39 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by babytiger View Post
I really don't get Red Lobster. Same with Outback, Olive Garden and the such. Frankly, all the food are pretty bad. AND, they are pricey! For the same price, I can get several meals at some local joints that actually serve good food.


No matter where I go, I know I can walk into any of the above 3 chains and get exactly what I expect to get.  The prices are competitive in their respective market segments and while some competitors are better, some are MUCH worse.  These chains appeal to the majority.  I dare say that in any market in America, given a RANDOM sampling of inhabitants, you could build a crappy Italian joint, an Olive Garden, and a fantastic Italian gourmet restaurant side by side and OG would garner the most business.  Some would eat the lower-priced but less appealing food and some would gladly pay the premium for the gourmet restaurant, but the majority would choose the devil they know for the cost they accept. 

post #40 of 113
Quote:

Originally Posted by gobblygook View Post

 

No matter where I go, I know I can walk into any of the above 3 chains and get exactly what I expect to get.  The prices are competitive in their respective market segments and while some competitors are better, some are MUCH worse.  These chains appeal to the majority.  I dare say that in any market in America, given a RANDOM sampling of inhabitants, you could build a crappy Italian joint, an Olive Garden, and a fantastic Italian gourmet restaurant side by side and OG would garner the most business.  Some would eat the lower-priced but less appealing food and some would gladly pay the premium for the gourmet restaurant, but the majority would choose the devil they know for the cost they accept. 


This could very well explain why in a city like NYC, where you have AMAZING food choices at every budget and taste level, chain restaurants like Olive Garden and McDonalds are still wildly popular among tourists.  It boggles the mind how someone could come here and then opt to go to Fridays, but I guess the average American prefers familiarity in this area.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post

Shavy, you managed to utterly miss my point.

 

I was talking about extreme overabundance in this country and how it allows ridiculous arguments about what "real cooking" is to exist. How you took that as a chance to go off about McDonald's versus organic food, I haven't the foggiest idea.

 

Secondly, ten dollars an hour is still ten dollars an hour. It's a job which pays. I know many a college graduate living at home with their parents because the two year plus job search still isn't panning out. Recent culinary school graduates are in an industry that is experiencing growth when many others in this nation have come to a grinding halt or have even started to shrink. If you disagree, take it up with the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

 

"Employment of chefs, head cooks, and food preparation and serving supervisors is expected to increase by 6 percent over the 2008-18 decade, which is more slowly than the average for all occupations. Growth will be generated by increases in population, a growing variety of dining venues, and continued demand for convenience. As more people opt for the time-saving ease of letting others do the cooking, the need for workers to oversee food preparation and serving will increase."

 

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos330.htm



I think the problem is that you think we're arguing about your original point.  We're not.  I was pointing out that things you presented as "facts", were in fact not fact at all.  Nothing to do with whatever point you were trying to make.  

 

Someone already mentioned the problems with your stated statistics, so I won't address that.  I'd like to point out the flaw in your thinking about college grads who "are living at home and struggling for 2 years to find jobs", with the implication that spending thousands of dollars on culinary school somehow gives those graduates an upper hand in the $10-an-hour job market.  It doesn't.  It may give them an edge IN THE KITCHEN over an applicant with NO experience, but it will not give them an edge in the majority of kitchens over an applicant who has real on-the-job kitchen experience in a similar establishment (and zero schooling).  And it gives them NO edge on a job applicant in any field OUTSIDE of food.  The reason that many college grads aren't "finding work" is because they aren't LOOKING at $10/hr jobs.  If they were willing to flip burgers for $10 an hour, they probably wouldn't be "job hunting for 2 years".  I'm not saying it's understandable that they don't want to take a menial job that won't lead anywhere, doesn't look good on a resume, and isn't remotely in their field of interest/study, but the implication that culinary students are better equipped to find a job than they are is flat out wrong, and more than a bit ridiculous.  Culinary students have a harder time than most occupations when it comes to post-graduate job placement, often externing (for free) or doing minimum or near-minimum wage work for years before they can work themselves up to something respectable.  The most schools can do is refer them for externships and post a job board where students look forward to vying for the same 30 jobs as the rest of the student body.

 

 

Again, just addressing your fallacious statements, not making a point about the decadence of western society, or lack thereof.  

post #41 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobblygook View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by babytiger View Post
I really don't get Red Lobster. Same with Outback, Olive Garden and the such. Frankly, all the food are pretty bad. AND, they are pricey! For the same price, I can get several meals at some local joints that actually serve good food.


No matter where I go, I know I can walk into any of the above 3 chains and get exactly what I expect to get.  The prices are competitive in their respective market segments and while some competitors are better, some are MUCH worse.  These chains appeal to the majority.  I dare say that in any market in America, given a RANDOM sampling of inhabitants, you could build a crappy Italian joint, an Olive Garden, and a fantastic Italian gourmet restaurant side by side and OG would garner the most business.  Some would eat the lower-priced but less appealing food and some would gladly pay the premium for the gourmet restaurant, but the majority would choose the devil they know for the cost they accept. 

 

Maybe it's because I'm in San Francisco and we have a lot of choices. But those chains are quite expensive compare to lots of other casual restaurants we have available. Most of those casual restaurants also serve much better food.
 

post #42 of 113

Celebrity

celebrity (sometimes referred to as a celeb in popular culture) is a person who is easily recognized in a society or culture.

 

Chef

kitchen chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Although over time the term has come to describe any person

who cooks for a living, traditionally it refers to a highly skilled professional who is proficient in all aspects of food preparation.

 

Celebrity chef

The term celebrity chef applies to a class of chefs who are well known for presenting cookery advice and demonstrations via mass media, especially television.

The term may also be applied to a historically famous chef such as Antoine Carême and Martino da Como.

 

Those are simple definitions. You don't have to like them, but that's it. EVERY person cooking on TV fits those combined definitions. Rachel, Giada, Sandra and Paula too, are "Celebrity Chefs". 

My goal is not "to head a Red Lobster". Not at all that I would mind the regular pay, a heathcare plan and retirement savings options offered. Major corporate restaurants offer those things. Until you don't have/get them you don't realize just how important they are. No matter where you work, "cooking mediocre food" is all on YOU. It doesn't matter where, if it comes out of your kitchen, it's got your name and fingerprints on it. If it's a mediocre dish, then you are a mediocre cook. Shavy, sweetheart, Red Lobster, Appleby's, Denny's, Olive Garden, TGIF, et al are a big part of multi-billions of dining-out dollars. Whether you agree or not, they are America. 

I digress. Do you all watch TV food/cooking shows to learn anything or to help you really become a better cook/chef? It's OK if you do. I however, watch them for ENTERTAINMENT. I'm a guy. I prefer to watch pretty women for entertainment (in this realm), than guys. I would rather look at Giada than Mario. I'm funny like that. 

In no way at all do I consider ANY celebrity chef, even the ones that I think suck,  "a disgrace to our profession". I think at the very least they give people an interest in food/cooking/eating. People will never stop going out to eat. People go out to eat to get food like they see on TV. HELLO?!?  That only helps those of us ITB. I don't think anything bad of Red Lobster. I was a guest. My host is a man from Australia on vacation, staying in a hotel almost attached to a RL location. He has never been there. I like RL for what they are. 

I've not seen "The Devil Wears Prada". I'd love to know any of the dishes put out by FL or Per Se that were "trailing indicators" of what restaurants are serving now. Please, help me out with that. 

For the money that the lowest paid FN Celebrity Chef makes, you can say that my food sucks and I am the worst chef on the planet. TYVM. All the way to the bank. IT'S ENTERTAINMENT. You don't have to respect me. 

TY foodpump for your comment. You have caught on to what I am saying. 

Gunnar ....................

Quote:

Is it at all possible that a recipe like this is just there to show how simple a dish might be? A simple dish with no complications at all, just heat it up and serve it. 

Reading is fundamental. Listening is a skill. TV is for entertainment. Tell me this too please. Just how many at home non-culinarilly-skilled people even have the tools to steam anything without scalding themselves silly? 

 

It kills me in that some of you hate TV Celebrity Chefs, and major chain fast-food dining experiences. They are what they are. Live with it. LOL. 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

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post #43 of 113

Points for your lovely formatting.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

My goal is not "to head a Red Lobster". Not at all that I would mind the regular pay, a heathcare plan and retirement savings options offered. Major corporate restaurants offer those things. Until you don't have/get them you don't realize just how important they are. No matter where you work, "cooking mediocre food" is all on YOU. It doesn't matter where, if it comes out of your kitchen, it's got your name and fingerprints on it. If it's a mediocre dish, then you are a mediocre cook. Shavy, sweetheart, Red Lobster, Appleby's, Denny's, Olive Garden, TGIF, et al are a big part of multi-billions of dining-out dollars. Whether you agree or not, they are America. 

 

You can say anything to me, if you couch it in affectionate terms.  <3

 

 

I digress. Do you all watch TV food/cooking shows to learn anything or to help you really become a better cook/chef? It's OK if you do. I however, watch them for ENTERTAINMENT. I'm a guy. I prefer to watch pretty women for entertainment (in this realm), than guys. I would rather look at Giada than Mario. I'm funny like that. 

 

The thing is, plenty of regular Americans DO watch food/cooking shows to learn something.  A lot of people "learn to cook" by watching TV personalities.  

 

 

In no way at all do I consider ANY celebrity chef, even the ones that I think suck,  "a disgrace to our profession". I think at the very least they give people an interest in food/cooking/eating.

 

Good point.

 

 

For the money that the lowest paid FN Celebrity Chef makes, you can say that my food sucks and I am the worst chef on the planet. TYVM. All the way to the bank. IT'S ENTERTAINMENT. You don't have to respect me. 

 

IOW, what's most important to you is the paycheck, not putting out a product you're proud of.  Or maybe it only matters in a restaurant kitchen, but when if you had the opportunity to go on TV and put corn-nuts on an apple-pie-filling chocolate-frosted angel food cake, you would jump at it, and not care that it was absolute garbage you're trying to pass off as acceptable food.  Someone mentioned (maybe you?) that they would laugh all the way to the bank.  It's my guess that this is what most of these TV personalities are doing.

 

 

It kills me in that some of you hate TV Celebrity Chefs, and major chain fast-food dining experiences. They are what they are. Live with it. LOL. 

 

You really don't understand or see how someone who cares passionately about their craft, about making and serving the best food they possibly can, would take umbrage with someone putting out the aforementioned cake and calling it a great holiday dessert, and encouraging others to make it?

 

post #44 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

...It kills me in that some of you hate TV Celebrity Chefs, and major chain fast-food dining experiences. They are what they are. Live with it. LOL. 

 

For me, "hate" is not really what I feel for some of the shows on FNTV or other networks. I will admit to a twitch, maybe even a twinge, of jealousy but that is overpowered by a feeling of, oh what, disappointment that the producers/investors/actors of many shows and restaurants demonstrate such disdain for the viewers/guests/customers  that support such shows/businesses and that the viewers/guests/customers are so gullible.

 

Would I trade places with any one of them? Nope! Not for even double or triple the fame and/or fortune.

 

When the time comes, all I will be remembered for is my honesty and integrity as well as my reputation for doing my best.

 


 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #45 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post


Gunnar ....................

Quote:

Is it at all possible that a recipe like this is just there to show how simple a dish might be? A simple dish with no complications at all, just heat it up and serve it. 

Reading is fundamental. Listening is a skill. TV is for entertainment. Tell me this too please. Just how many at home non-culinarilly-skilled people even have the tools to steam anything without scalding themselves silly? 

 

It kills me in that some of you hate TV Celebrity Chefs, and major chain fast-food dining experiences. They are what they are. Live with it. LOL. 

 


Oh I read it, it was pretty simple to understand too. I just replied that steamed green beans are just as easy and tastier.  your counter argument is that steamed vege are dangerous and or difficult? steampots come in quite a number of beginner pots and pan sets, people usually use them to strain boiled vege or pasta.  I also think that if you can boil pasta and warm a jar of Ragu, or reheat a can of peas in butter your probably competent enough to figure out how to simply steam some vege without maiming or disfiguring yourself and have IMO a better dish.

 

I simply stated at the beginning of all this that it's a sad recipe, not worth the effort to post it. I have to agree with Pete McCracken it belongs on a can of peas.

 

As far as chain restaurants, I have a personal belief that it is important to support local business, not chains. If more people supported them then they could also afford to give nice benefits to their employees.

 

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #46 of 113

"anything to me, .......... couch ............... affectionate"

OMG!!!!!               I'm dieing here.

 

As for the "learning" idea .....This is a forum of and for culinary people of the world. "We" are all not "regular Americans", or regular anything else I think. 

 

I'm good w/ acronyms, but I can't get "IOW", or "IYAM" from an earlier post. TIA for some clarification. 

 

Paychecks are very important to me. I can't be proud of much w/o a paycheck for support. NO, I'm not saying that I'm a whore, it just ainte easy being poor. I've put out a lot of things that I wasn't proud of, but they were the best I could do w/ what I was given. Sometimes you just gotta do whatcha gotta do to get the job done. Professionals get jobs done. YES, I would be happy to laugh all the way to the bank sometime. The nearest future possible would be nice. 

 

I understand all kinds of things. I have all kinds of passion. However, I don't tell people how to live or earn their livings (for the most part), believe or act (again for the most part). There is so much bad regular (so-to-speak) TV on that I'm not going to let TV food shows get me upset. I'm sorry if it offends you, but Denny's is one of my absolute favorite 4:00 am places to eat. 

 

 

 

 

I love your idealism Pete, but I gotta earn a living. I am for hire though, if you're looking for a chef. 

Gunnar, I doubt highly the average person's ability to steam food without hurting themselves. I've got a lot of experience with "average people". The "average person" is not very bright or safe. Sorry for my negativity. As far as chain restaurant employment, where do you think it comes from? People aren't imported to work at chain places. Locals have just as much chance. 

 

 

 


Edited by IceMan - 1/12/11 at 5:42pm

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

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post #47 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

"anything to me, .......... couch ............... affectionate"

OMG!!!!!               I'm dieing here.

 

 

Men.  :D

 

As for the "learning" idea .....This is a forum of and for culinary people of the world. "We" are all not "regular Americans", or regular anything else I think. 

 

Weren't you just discussing "regular America"?  It was in that context that I made my comment (which I thought was pretty unambiguous, but hey, it's the internet).

 

I'm good w/ acronyms, but I can't get "IOW", or "IYAM" from an earlier post. TIA for some clarification. 

 

IOW = In other words.  I don't begin to understand the other.

 

Paychecks are very important to me. I can't be proud of much w/o a paycheck for support. NO, I'm not saying that I'm a whore, it just ainte easy being poor. I've put out a lot of things that I wasn't proud of, but they were the best I could do w/ what I was given. Sometimes you just gotta do whatcha gotta do to get the job done. Professionals get jobs done. YES, I would be happy to laugh all the way to the bank sometime. The nearest future possible would be nice. 

 

I understand all kinds of things. I have all kinds of passion. However, I don't tell people how to live or earn their livings (for the most part), believe or act (again for the most part).

 

Nobody's telling anybody anything.  They're just saying that they don't like those shows and that those people aren't culinary professionals who truly care about the food they produce.  I'm not sure what your dander is up about, but I think you're misunderstanding others here.

 

 

There is so much bad regular (so-to-speak) TV on that I'm not going to let TV food shows get me upset. I'm sorry if it offends you, but Denny's is one of my absolute favorite 4:00 am places to eat. 

 

I don't recall anyone being offended by anyone else's enjoyment of crappy chain restaurants.  Everyone likes their own thing, gezunte hait.  However, there's a difference between the food put out by a high school kid at Pizza Hut or Denny's, who's just working for their paycheck, and the food put out at an inexpensive diner by someone who actually cares about quality and cooks because they love it.  Let's not confuse the two, even if they both have their place and even if you enjoy them.

 

 

 



As an aside, is there any way to edit quotes or use html here?  This comments-within-quotes thing is kind of annoying.

post #48 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post


Gunnar, I doubt highly the average person's ability to steam food without hurting themselves. I've got a lot of experience with "average people". The "average person" is not very bright or safe. Sorry for my negativity.

 

It's your opinion, you are entitled to have one. No need to be sorry for any implied negativity, I see how people drive cars too. It does raise some concerns.

 

As far as chain restaurant employment, where do you think it comes from? People aren't imported to work at chain places. Locals have just as much chance.

 

yes they do, but if I have the choice to eat at a place where I might meet the owner at the grocery store or a place that has a District Manager of chain outlet #157- #172. Guess which one I will choose to eat at? That's a bit simplified really, but I am not trying to push a political agenda or press my beliefs on you, just saying.

 

 

 


 

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post #49 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post


 


 It's the equivalent of a Shakespearean actor coming out and saying "uh..To be or not to...uh... whatever".  and then farting on stage.

 

I dang near choked on my sweet tea when I read that! Gunnar you are my new favorite person!

 

 

Yeah, the Paula Deen English Peas "recipe" is a bit of a joke, bless her heart. I do have a soft spot for her, she reminds me of my own darling grandma, bling and all.

 

As for Sandra Lee, I can't stand her. She doesn't cook. She barely re-heats. I can see her place "in the world" as there are housewives out there that are ok with feeding their families pre-packaged junk. They feel good that they can "fool" their friends at bunko into thinking they made those cute little cupcakes from scratch. (I don't agree with it, being a mom & wife and a chef.)  I don't care for the majority of the people on Food Network. I enjoy watching Alton Brown, he is funny and informative.
 


 

post #50 of 113

FWIW, "IYAM" means "if you ask me".

 

And I think we're going to have to agree to disagree on the definition of a "celebrity chef". You seem to think that anyone that cooks on TV is a celebrity chef. However, I believe that you must be a chef to be a celebrity chef. If we need to go into the definition of a chef, then we can. Sandra Lee isn't a chef, no matter how you slice it.

 

Your arguement, by extention, would mean that Joe down at the local dive is a celebrity chef because he's known by all the regulars as the guy that makes good burgers. He's not a celebrity, but since he's a chef, that means he's a celebrity chef. I don't buy it.

 

"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #51 of 113

ITA with you about Denny's.

 

4 am after a night of drinking their french toast tastes mighty good...As I remember it from my college days of course. lol.gif  

 

As much as I love good food, I can appreciate the crap too. IMO there is nothing better for a hangover than a big Dr. Pepper and Taco Bell. When I was pregnant with my oldest I was sick for so long and the only thing I craved was Taco Bell.

Shoot KFC's mac and cheese, I love it. The pasta is so over cooked, it's not even funny, it's nuclear orange but It's yummy.

post #52 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post
...I love your idealism Pete, but I gotta earn a living. I am for hire though, if you're looking for a chef. 

Well IceMan, in the last 50 years I've never "had a job", oh yes, I've been paid, sometimes quite well, but I've never thought of ANYTHING I've done for compensation as a job! I've even appeared on TV cooking with unprocessed, raw, ingredients!

 

And I've had a lot of people work with me and for me. The ones who worked "for me", did not last long, the ones who worked "with me", I still work with when the occasion presents itself.

 

Never had one who "works with me" say, or even intimate, "that's good enough" or "that's the best I can do with what I have", that only comes from those who wanted to "work for me", they gotta make a living, you know.

 

Perhaps you think of me as an idealist, however, I've never had to find work or look for a job, work and job(s) always seem to find me, sometimes even with pay attached.

 

Good luck in your future endeavors.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #53 of 113

A long time ago, when I was still in high school, we used to play hockey in my back yard on Friday nights. On Friday afternoons we would pool all the money we had for beer. We would drink half of it shoveling the pond at the end of my yard. We would take a couple hours break to try and sober up. That night we would play until we either ran out of balls (we didn't use pucks, we used bad tennis balls from an indoor court by my house) or we ran out of beer. We're talking +/- 2:00 am. We would then go to Denny's. For me it was cheese soup/clam chowder and a patty melt. 

 

Shavy, love ..........

"American" the first time was in meaning to where the greatest % of Americans are spending their fast-food dining money. The second reference was in regards to the completely global membership of this entire forum. I don't really think many people here would watch food TV to learn anything. It's not that "anybody" was telling "anyone" "anything", My point was that I don't begrudge any celebrity chefs for what they do on Food TV. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #54 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

Shavy, love ..........

 

Whoooo.... :swoons:  Keep 'em comin'!

 

 

 

"American" the first time was in meaning to where the greatest % of Americans are spending their fast-food dining money. The second reference was in regards to the completely global membership of this entire forum. I don't really think many people here would watch food TV to learn anything. It's not that "anybody" was telling "anyone" "anything", My point was that I don't begrudge any celebrity chefs for what they do on Food TV. 

 

I've totally lost track of whatever it is we're arguing about (must be too much starin' into those big baby whatever-color-eyes-you-have), but I agree with your last two points.  I think the "average american" has "average expectations" about how "average food" should taste.  I also think that people like Ina Garten and formerly Mario Batali encouraged the curious among those viewers to strive for something more than "average food of average taste".  It's not incomprehensible that they even inspired average people to become wonderful professional chefs.  That doesn't mean we can't cringe when seeing some of the monstrosities being presented on TV, or disagree that Aunt Sandy ain't no "chef" (or at least, not a good one, if she's sober when creating and presenting those masterpieces).  You might not begrudge them because you agree with the laughing-to-the-bank mentality, but there are scores of people who wouldn't present that drek at any price.  Even fame lady-of-the-evening Anthony Bourdain has said there are things to which he will not stoop.  Granted we all have our price, but apparently some people feel Celebrity Chefdom isn't worth it, and are appalled by what's passed off as 'cooking'.   To each their own.  drinkbeer.gif

post #55 of 113


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post...My point was that I don't begrudge any celebrity chefs for what they do on Food TV. 

I agree with regards to "celebrity chefs", however, those are few and far between!

 

If you are talking about Mario, Emeril, Ming Sai, etal, no problem.

 

However, there IS a difference between "celebrity chefs" and "celebrities"!

 

Where one "draws the line" may be very subjective, but the line is still there!

 

I, for one, do not feel that everyone that has a TV show is a "celebrity chef", though a successful TV show may be an important component in becoming a "celebrity". My goodness, Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and a host of others are "celebrities", but that doesn't mean I have to respect what they say or do, and when it comes to food, I do have my opinion.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #56 of 113

LOL Pete. I am so very happy for you that you are so financially well off. I however, am still only a mortal. << edited >>

 

The BLACK HAWKS put a very nice beating on Colorado this evening. I've indulged in a bit of the grape. I'm feeling really professionally subordinated right now since post #52. I'm just going to brag a little bit here to make myself feel a little better. 

 

I was invited this spring to be a part of an event in Washington DC.  It was an invitation to facilitate a cool movement by White House Assistant Chef Sam Kass. It was on the south lawn of the White House with the First Lady and a whole bunch of cool people. I had to pass because I was so broke at the time that I qualified for government cheese. No funding was available to cover costs associated with attending. I was quite aggravated to say the least. Yeah, I got invited to cook at the White House. I probably would have never cleared security anyway, I'm told. But hey, as it was I'm sure you were invited too. 

 

 

 

 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #57 of 113

Whoa......

 

Just got back from work, and boy has this thread taken off.

 

Well, I guess one way to  look at it is to use James Douglas Morrison's famous words (Jim Morrison of the Doors) : 

 

ALIVE!!! She cried....

 

 

What we need is a seedy bar with a pool table and lots of beers, 'cause if we were all there in person we'd probably all be buying each other rounds.

 

Hey, it's just opinions,

 

And uh, Iceman, it's my opinion that the Blackhawks won't make the playoffs this year, but the Canucks will..................

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #58 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

LOL Pete. I am so very happy for you that you are so financially well off. I however, am still only a mortal. << edited >>...

My apologies if I misled you, "financially well off", is a condition I have never been fortunate to enjoy. Unless I receive compensation for my efforts, I do not eat. Fortunately for me, I'm not so sure about anyone else, people seek me out and do compensate me. I've never regretted the choices I've made nor the results therefrom.

 

Quote:

 

.. But hey, as it was I'm sure you were invited too.

I'm certain it was an oversight, though it may possibly be a result of my political bent, my invitation for that particular event was never received. biggrin.gif I have been fortunate to have been invited and attended several White House functions, albeit not in a "culinary capacity". 

 

And, like you, I am definitely "mortal", I just dislike others dictating when and what I must do, though I did serve in the military. talker.gif


 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #59 of 113

This comments-within-quotes thing is kind of annoying.

 

I've always felt the same, Shavy, so simply cut and paste. In my case I put the quoted part in italics, just because.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #60 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommamae View Post

Oh wow. I've never been misunderstood so drastically by so many people this quickly before. It's like a personal record or something... Anyway, the rest of you can take care and have fun debating this all you want, I'm bowing out and getting back to the real world where common sense and English syntax actually count for something. Cheers!

 

Oh, and the original point of this post... those comments are priceless. Absolutely the bitchiest remarks I have ever read before. I've never seen a group of people get that rabid over a simple how-to recipe before. But that's what the internet is for, right? Haha!

I love angry people biggrin.gif they're so self righteous and easy to poke thumb.gif

 

My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
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