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about a recipe/style of making buffalo wings I've been searching for for years

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Back in the 80s, there was this now-defunct restaurant in central PA called Paradise Alley that served free wings on certain nights.  They were not only the best wings I've ever had but the single best food I've ever had in my life.

 

The heat seemed to eminate from within.  I could taste a bit of butter flavor.  but they were dry when served, no sauce dripping to speak of.  Somebody told me they were double baked, not sure if that's true.  They were very very hot but just perfect.  This image captures the general color of them (though it's a pic of boneless wings)

 

http://www.delish.com/cm/delish/images/boneless-buffalo-wings-xl-85589761.jpg

 

Anybody have any idea what kind of wing recipe I'm talking about ?

post #2 of 16

they may have been dipped in a mix of franks wing sauce and melted butter then breaded and fried or baked. were they breaded at all or just the skins?

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

only very slightly if at all.   but no this was a very delicate thing, not just baked on sauce.  like I said the heat seemed to eminate from it, was kind of delayed.

post #4 of 16

hmmm.....wonder if they were just marinated in say a pepper (jalapeno or habenaro) puree overnight and just baked. that would give the oils time enough to work into the meat.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

I guess that could be possible.  Anybody else have any ideas ?

post #6 of 16



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

hmmm.....wonder if they were just marinated in say a pepper (jalapeno or habenaro) puree overnight and just baked. that would give the oils time enough to work into the meat.



Gunnar, I wonder if they marinated them in a Franks and then fried them in a regular Chicken breading. If I was doing it that way, I would marinate the tenders, put into buttermilk then breading ten fry, that way all the heat would be in the Chicken tender...................ChefBillyB

post #7 of 16

True, and the wing in the pic the OP showed were breaded. I was more thinking out loud of just leaving the wings in a pepper and oil marinade and then baking them,  without breading, leaving a more natural looking wing. Instead of the Franks bright red sauce look.Think enough heat would get into the wings?

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #8 of 16

Not that I'm advocating KFC, but have you ever tried their "Hot Wings"?

 

They come out crispy, but with a distinctive "bite" of cayenne/capsaicin, maybe an injection/marinade followed by cayenne in the breading?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #9 of 16

Franks would be a hotter than Hell Marinade, I'll have my Chef marinate a few chicken tenders this week and will see what happens...........Bill

post #10 of 16

Gunnar, I had this while I was watching my Seahawks get killed today........This is one of the Jalapeno Sausage that we get made when we process or Pigs. I put on cream cheese sauteed onions and bell peppers and topped with a zesty red pepper relish. The cream cheese cooled down the sausage, the peppers and onions added a nice crunch and flavor, the red pepper relish offered a nice zesty sweet and hot flavor. I can say, the sandwich was better than the Seahawks game plan.............Bill006.JPG

post #11 of 16

LOL, a Seahawks fan. Oh you poor guy. I had a friend who was a huge Seahawks fan, everyone gave him grief as they just can't seem to close the deal no matter how well they start a season. I was nice...as I am a Raider fan....they haven't got much done in a looong time either.  That's a good looking sausage I thought it was a chili dog, but yours sounds way better.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

well I'm going to try to marinate some serious peppers along with butter and Franks into the chicken and then bake it.  I still suspect there's something more exotic to these wings I had though.

post #13 of 16

 


I guess, it the small green peppers called "bird's eye chili". I think it is the hottest one in chili peppers. as what you're saying...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scott time View Post

only very slightly if at all.   but no this was a very delicate thing, not just baked on sauce.  like I said the heat seemed to eminate from it, was kind of delayed.


this pepper has a somehow delayed reaction of chili. Why not, try this? :)

post #14 of 16
IMHO.. baking a sauce like "Frank's" only serves to concentrate the salt with no positive contribution to "flavour". But, wings are an intensely personaly item.. moreso than a great many other foods, in my experience. Maybe the wings were brined in a chile solution before being cooked?
post #15 of 16

 

Bake your wings at 425-450 for about an hour until they're brown and crispy then add half Franks and half butter for tastiest wings. To have them soak the stuff up and serve "dry" or kind of, you could bake them in the sauce perhaps. Worth a try and fun to explore what works, especially with Superbowl around the corner. Good luck.

 

post #16 of 16

I worked in a chain of small-town fast food restaurants that served a hot fried chicken.  There was no sauce.  Our restaurant actually halfed the amount of rub we used because otherwise, the chicken was "too hot" for the customers.  This was in no way meant to be "buffalo wings", just your basic "fried chicken".  We used a dry seasoning mix, quite a reddish color, both cayenne and paprika (and other spices as well).  The chicken came in pre-cut and we would clean the pieces of extra fat and such and rinse the pieces.  We then tossed two complete birds in a big s/s bowl, tossed with this dry spice mix and put back in their bags in the cooler for use the next day.  The next day was a dump in flour (seasoned, but with S&P, not an overly spicy coating), dunked in ice water quickly, drained and tossed back in the flour.  15 mins in 325-350 degree oil for two complete birds.  The seasoning mix would burn the underside of the fingernails and if there was a cut, it hurt badly...

 

On breasts, obviously, once you got past the outer flesh, the heat was not in the inner flesh, but the heat would stick with you.  I'm wondering if instead of a wet marinade, you used a dry spice mix, you might achieve the results being desired.  Also, even if you pulled off the breading, you could see some spices, but not an "obvious" layer of seasoning.  While I refer to it as a dry spice mix, the chicken was wet from the water, so the spice mix was wet, but only a surface wetness, not a liquid marinade but also not a classic "dry" rub. 

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