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ginger cream

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

i am making cream puffs for a high tea and would like to fill them with a ginger cream...any thoughts, ideas, recipes would be greatly appreciated...they will need to hold up for an hour or so...will a stiff whipped cream and powdered sugar do it or should i be looking at maybe using marscapone or ricotta?   thanks....a pastry chef i ain't!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 9

Joey,

 

Just before my teeth came out I made some pumpkin breads using one of those baking sheets with a dozen mini-bundt molds. They came out more like chewy bar cookies than quick breads, and I served them by filling with a ginger cream.

 

What I did was mince crystalized ginger and add it to the cream a couple of hours in advance, so the flavor would infuse. Then I whipped the cream stiff with a little sugar (about 2 tbls per cup). The cream held for a long time---i whipped it several hours before serving and it was fine. In fact, there was some left-over that still held its shape the next day.  

 

In my case I sprinkled additional chopped crystalized ginger on top, but that won't be needed with the puffs.  

 

The trick to making whipped cream, as I'm sure you know, is to assure that everything is very cold. I put the mixing bowl, whisk, everything in the fridge at least an hour in advance of whipping.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 9

gingerbread elcairs or puffs.

make a gingerbread chantilly cream or mousse, fill shells, dip in dark chocolate and dust with mexican chocolate sprinkles.

yum.

post #4 of 9

I would warm a little milk together with a minimal amount of gingerslices and let infuse from the heat. Remove the ginger, heat again and whisk in 1-2 gelatine sheets (previously soaked in cold water and squeezed as usual), cool and add this to some mascarpone and sugar and mix well to loosen the mascarpone. Then add whipped cream and fold in.

The gelatine will make the cream more substantial and hold for a very long time, even in the fridge!

post #5 of 9

I would experiment with the amount of ginger and be cautious as a little ginger can go a long way as I am sure many of us have found out. You can grate the ginger and then just strain the cream afterwards. The advantage to grating is that you can use less ginger and the steeping time is not as long. As for steeping I recommend just warming the cream slightly (140-160 degrees) and letting the ginger steep. Make sure you taste the cream periodically so that you are sure you have not steeped it too long. If you do steep it too long the simple fix is to just as more cream to dilute it.

 

Chris, I have to say the addition of gelatin sounds like over kill to me unless you were making this for a Sunday brunch buffet or a competition where you needed the cream to hold for such a long time. The addition of the gelatin would change the texture from lightly whipped to a much stiffer product. Add in the mascarpone and I think it would be even stiffer. If the goal is to go for a simple ginger cream then I think the simpler the better. cream, sugar and ginger. I like your idea and would like to try it but I think for a simple ginger cream you could get great results without all the extra additions.

 

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

was thinking that i would like to add a ginger cognac as well, so how does come into play with the cream whipping and holding? also, instead of grated fresh ginger, was thinking i could use a bit of the juice from pink sushi ginger...whaddaya think? the juice is sweet...last question, when i make choux pastry, it has always been for savory things...but for the cream puffs, should i add sugar or milk..thanks all

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #7 of 9

Based on nothing but a gut feeling, Joey, I think the alcohol would break the cream. I would whip it first, then add a modicum of the cognac just to kick it up a notch.

 

I've always thought that for savory choux you use water, for sweet you use milk. I've never added sugar at all. Don't imagine it would hurt anything, though. But my choice would be honey over granulated sugar.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 9

Nicko, the gelatine is very, very minimal, say 2 sheets/1000ml. It just gives some support and prevents the cream from breaking down and wet the chou pastry. The same is often done with sorbets. Adding a little gelatine doesn't change the texture of sorbet at all, it just prevents the sorbet from turning into water too soon. Adding milk to the mascarpone makes it loose, and the whipped cream doesn't do very much at all I guess. The ratio's would be 1-5-5; milkinfusion-mascarpone-cream on a total of 500ml (1gelatinesheet) or 1000ml (2 gelatinesheets).

I also wouldn't grate the ginger or it will taste soapy. Frankly I would never use ginger in a preparation like this, but that's just my opinion of course.

Durangojo, I never heard of ginger cognac. I would however go for Tia Maria instead and mix some coffeepowder in the mixture too. Or simply no ginger nor booze at all.

 

You could make it much less risky by using crème pâtissière, the standard filling for these things. And I would dip the top in chocolate too.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

well,i've decided in the end to go with a pastry cream filling instead of a whipped cream( think i was just trying to take the easy route with the whipped cream).....chef belgium,'CANTON' is a ginger cognac using baby vietnamese ginger...it is quite awesome to sip and cook with....i make our restaurants' creme brulee  with it...try it...it will give you reason to live! thanks everyone for your time and input....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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