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The Earl of Sandwich

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

First off I want to thank KY for getting me out of my box.  I was too constrained to method and analytical, now I am a new man.

 

I made a Rosemary Chicken Salad sandwich mix today and instead of Smoked Almonds that are not in house I used cashews and I also added in some ground corriander, olives and Feta cheese.

 

It is incredible how inexpensively you can make a bunch of delicious sandwiches at home as opposed to premade in the store deli.

 

Off topic but if you reply do Red Potatoes take alot longer to get soft.  I was making Chicken Corn Chowder and it seemed to take much much longer than the recommended 5 minutes for my Red Potatoes substituted for Russets to get soft.

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post #2 of 11

5 minutes not long enough for any variety potato

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks Ed here is the recipe, do you see any other problems with it?

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/creamy-spicy-corn-chowder-with-chicken-recipe/index.html

 

I did not add that it does get simmered for five more minutes but it still seems to short a period of cooking.

 

If you were the one that gave me the advice about obsessing I should give you credit, I forgot if it was you or KY.

 

Your attention to this matter is sincerely appreciated.

post #4 of 11

Other than the potato thing, the recipe is pretty straight forward. Most recipes of that nature precook the spuds in the liquid, though. Depending on how small they are diced, boil them for anywhere from five to 15 minutes, just until tender, then drain and add to the saute pan.

 

A couple of comments:

 

As Ed mentioned, five minutes is way to short for any potatoes. But the same can be said for a lot of given times. Keep in mind that many recipes are based on using industrial equipment, and your home stove does not run as hotly. The number one example would be when reducing liquids, and you read something like start with two cups of liquid and "reduce to 1/4 cup, about six minutes." Yeah, right! Not on any home range I know about.

 

Another trick: Start bacon in a cold skillet, and cook over lower heat. That will help it render better. Same goes for anything you are rendering. And sometimes it helps to add a tablespoon or two of water, along with the fat. What happens is the water warms up first, and transfers the heat to the fat to get it started. Eventually the water evaporates and you're left with the rendered oil.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the bacon trick and all your valuable help.  I really appreciate it.  It almost does not seem fair that you type so much and I just send a short thanks.

 

I have experience in window cleaning and blackjack so if any member of the group wants advice in those fields I will respond.

 

I made the same offer to the people on the electronics forum I visited recently.

post #6 of 11

Does that mean you'll actually come and clean my windows, Kevin? biggrin.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 11

No one here is looking for a payback but Thank You

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 11

Wow that seems sumptuous. I want to try that too. :)

post #9 of 11

Kevin!

Try a Tarragon chicken salad with toasted almonds, served in a half avacado or a tropical chicken salad with chopped pineapple,golden raisins , curry, coconut and chopped macadammi, served in a 1/4 pineapple . I love any kind of chick salad

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 11

And something to keep in mind: When you make stock, start with full birds. Remove them after about 40 minutes, strip the meat off the bones, and return the bones to the pot.

 

That will provide oodles of poached chicken, ideal for things like chicken salads (as well as chicken a la king, chicken pot pie, chicken croquettes, etc. etc. etc.).

 

Speaking of chicken salad; awhile back I had an abundance of small sweet peppers and came up with this chicken salad as a filling. Makes a great sandwich or salad plate as well:

 

2 large chicken breasts, poached & diced (or equivilent)

1 cup red onion, chopped and caramelized

1/2 sweet red pepper, chopped fine (can be roasted first)

2 oz Gorgonzola, crumbled

3/4 cup mayo

Salt & pepper to taste

Paprika

18 small peppers (Sweet Apple, Jingle Bell, Orchid, etc.)

 

Combine first 7 ingredients.

 

Cut the shoulders off the peppers. Remove seeds and ribs. Fill with chicken mixture. Sprinkle lightly with paprika. Top with shoulder pieces as caps if desired.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks again, I do read your feedback and use it on a regular basis.

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