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Au jus - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Maggi is well known over here. Comes in small bottles and contains a dark liquid seasoning with a strong salt and celery taste.

Hence the popular name over here for a herb that you know as "lovage" = maggikruid in dutch, which means maggiherb, referring to the celerytaste of Maggi seasoning. Lovage has a very pronounced celery taste, although it's no family of celery as such.

 

Also, does anyone put a small tbsp of flour in the roasting drippings, let it fry a while, add some bouillon or stock, let thicken and like I already suggested, add a dash of dark soy to season and colour?

The flour makes the jus just a little thicker so it sticks to your beef. Delicious!

post #32 of 39

Yep...Blackjack...a by-product we have from multi-tasking with butterscotch blushing.gif & repetitive reheating for sugarwork ...not fully burnt of course but no longer sweet... stored in the freezer, old school and ideally innocuos if you just want to control colour...I use it often

 

Here Maggi is a brand is of powdered soups, stocks and gravy browning...like Knorr

 

Is Au jus the same as Jus roti then?

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post

Maggi is well known over here. Comes in small bottles and contains a dark liquid seasoning with a strong salt and celery taste.

Hence the popular name over here for a herb that you know as "lovage" = maggikruid in dutch, which means maggiherb, referring to the celerytaste of Maggi seasoning. Lovage has a very pronounced celery taste, although it's no family of celery as such.

 

Also, does anyone put a small tbsp of flour in the roasting drippings, let it fry a while, add some bouillon or stock, let thicken and like I already suggested, add a dash of dark soy to season and colour?

The flour makes the jus just a little thicker so it sticks to your beef. Deli

 

Chris ! if I am not mistaken  Maggi is packed by Nestle who is huge in Europe. And yes we add flour to the drippings this starts the formation of the  Brown Roux.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 

I thought that when one adds flour they are actually making a gravy. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #35 of 39

With all the oil and grease from the roasting of the meat it starts as a roux and I believe when stock or liquid is added it is then a true gravy

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I thought that when one adds flour they are actually making a gravy. 



Absolutely, but isn't that delicious?

post #37 of 39

Thanks, Chefedb, for the explanation!

 

Now that Maggi sounds like MSG used in common homes in Korea.

Every household had a little bowl of MSG right next to salt and used on anything and everything.  Though I think its use is less popular now due to its controversy.  I put a little MSG in anything that says "No MSG added."  smile.gif  Not really, but I feel the urge.

post #38 of 39

Maybe I just like making flames, and really big flames, but I've read many a persons jus recipe and see lots of whine, but no cognac. Anyone make theirs with cognac or brandy?

post #39 of 39
Thread Starter 

I don't use any alcohol in my jus, rarely have done so.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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