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How Does Your Garden Grow?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Anybody made decisions on what they'll be growing this year?

 

I've started my list. And, as usual, there's too many seeds and not enough land. But here's what I have in mind so far:

 

Greens: Arugala, Black Kale, Mesclun Mix.

Peas: One trellis each English and Snow; one of Sugar Pea (a cowpea).

Tomatoes: DePinto (a full row, to produce enough for canning); Brandt's Old German Pink; an as yet to be determined cherry for Friend Wife.

Potatoes: A new purple variety I'm trialing.

Squash: The South African white pumpkin I finally found seed for; yellow crookneck.

Peppers: Boldogi Spice; Sweet Apple; Cubanelle; Aji Colorado.

Eggplant: Round Mauve (which I'll grow in containers, hopefully deterring the flea beetles).

Cucumber: Snow's Fancy.

Leeks: Prizetaker.

Onions: No bulbing onions this year. But I'll be planting onion sets for scallions.

Beans: No hard decision, yet. I'll grow at least three or four varieties. I've been promised seed for a Cherokee variety that comes right from the reservation. If that arrives, it will be one of them for sure. And probably Red Striped Greasy, which is our usual main-crop.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 29

its too cold here in Vancouver to plant anything but broad beans and peas yet but I am overly ready to get back into my allotment garden.

It is covered in winter rye now which is about 5" tall and will be dug in in the next 2 weeks so it has time to break down before I plant the cool weather stuff in March.

 

On the weekend I bought Gusto Italia seeds....beans,peas,carrot,spinach and red and white rainbow beets.

I also got some West Coast Seeds, local to the area , detroit beets ,late growing spinach for when the other has bolted and some bolt resistant oakleaf lettuce.

 

I have leeks in that I let a few go to seed and I never need to plant leeks.I will plant onion sets later on as well as cukes and tomatoes.

I usually get enough yellow onions from planting around the perimeter of my small allotment  6x12 to last me from Aug to Jan.Mind you there is just me so I dont need enough for a family.I need to be selective as my space is so small.

 

I also have a line of raspberries and a red rhubarb plant.

happy gardening.

post #3 of 29

So far, the only varieties I know for sure I'll be growing are Australian Butter Squash, White Scallops, Brandywine, Amish Paste,  and Celebrity (the only hybrid I grow) tomatoes, green striped cushaw, and Jade bush green beans.

 

It's still too early to plant here, but I'm thinking about putting in some cheap lettuce (3 varieties), English peas, and sugar snap pea seeds tomorrow anyway. I'll save the heirloom seeds until it's less likely to snow again.

post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

Well Granny, considering that the traditional date for planting English peas in Kentucky is Valentine's Day, you're technically late. biggrin.gif

 

I used to make a point of getting them in on that day. But they don't sprout until March, anyway, and you lose so many to rot and critters that I didn't see the point of it.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 29

KY, I've heard that about Valentine's Day, but I don't get it. I'm in zone 6, the same zone I was in when I lived in Michigan. Our planting date was Memorial Day. No matter, the ground was frozen solid a couple of days ago, so it's a moot point. I'm going to try again tomorrow, since it's nearly 70 degrees now and the ground should be thawed enough to hoe a little.

 

Next year, I want to try planting in the fall, too late for them to sprout, and see what grows when the ground first begins to thaw. Seems that's how the plants originally propagated before man got involved.

post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

I understand your confusion fully, Granny.

 

Even here in Kentucky the ground is often frozen on Valentine's Day. But some of those old timers will be out there with pickaxes, breaking a furrow, because, by gawd! today is pea planting time. English peas, fortunately, are super hardy. They'll lay in the cold ground until conditions are right, and then germinate. Thos conditions usually are right the first or second week of March. That being the case, I just wait until then to plant.

 

A more realistic target date, btw, is Good Friday for onions and potatoes.

 

For vegetable growers, knowing the zone is the next best thing to useless information. If people would use the full name, USDA Plant Hardiness Zones, the reason becomes more apparent. All that a zone # does is identify plants that will overwinter, unprotected, in that area. Thus, if a perennial flower is identified as ok in zone 6, you can reasonably expect that it will regrow each spring. But, in practical terms, vegetables are all annuals. Even those that are technically perennials are treated as annuals by gardeners. So knowing whether one will overwinter or not is, most of the time, meaningless.

 

What's important to vegetable growers are the frost dates, and the total length of the growing season. And those vary tremendously even within a particular zone.

 

In central Kentucky, the last frost date is roughly May 5. Add a week to ten days to that for where you are. Call it the 12th. To plan your growing activities, count backwards from that date as appropriate. For instance, tomatoes are usually started, indoors, 6 weeks before last frost. So you would start them on or about March 31. A little earlier certainly won't hurt, especially as our average last frost date has moving earlier the past several years.

 

I'm just guessing, now. But I suspect if you had fall-planted English peas this year you would be partially successful. But this past year was far from normal. In a more typical year our ground is unfrozen more than it is. So I'd be concerned that the seed would start to germinate, then get hit by a killer frost and die.

 

But, what the heck. It doesn't cost anything to give it a try.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 29

That's why I'm using the cheap seeds (Dollar General 3/$1) If they don't grow, oh, well. I have heirloom seeds for when the weather gets better.

 

I generally wait until I plant my regular garden to plant my potatoes and onions. It isn't that I don't know to plant them earlier, but I can't till the garden (don't know how to drive the tractor) and can't get hubby to do it until the weather is nice. So, I wait.

 

This year I'm thinking about trying an above-ground method of growing potatoes. I can do that without hubby. All I need to do is drive some stakes into the ground, wrap some bamboo shades around them (it doesn't have to be bamboo, but that's what I have), fill it 2/3 full of dirt, and plant my potatoes. Then, as they grow, I will add more dirt until the thing is full. When they die back, all I have to do is take off the bamboo and pick up the potatoes. This is a little different than other above-ground methods, as it actually plants the potatoes on enough loose dirt to allow the root system to grow and develop. The framing is 4' tall. I plan on making at least 2 of them, one (or more) for Yukon Gold and one (or more) for some kind of red potatoes. I'll let you know how it works. I've had zero luck with the other methods.

 

BTW, the extension agent said our last frost date is May 15, so you were pretty close.

post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 

BTW, the extension agent said our last frost date is May 15, so you were pretty close.

 

Sometimes, Darlin', it's just hard to be humble. cool.gif

 

Regarding the spuds. I was recently told, by someone who trials potatoes for Tom Wagner, that there is no point hilling potatoes more than ten inches, cuz that's all they'll produce at.

 

Don't know if that's true or not. But it's something to keep in mind. It seems to support my own, limited experience with above-ground potato growing.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 29

I haven't noticed my potatoes producing much above the original seed potato. When I heard of this method of growing them above ground, I looked up pictures of potato plants and they bore out what I'd observed. I really think the only reason for hilling them is to keep the plant from breaking, since they produce food for the plants to grow and the potatoes to develop. I have never found potatoes in the hills, above ground level. That's why this method makes sense to me, but we'll see how well it actually works.  Sometimes there's a big difference between theory and practice.

 

Here's one of the pictures, so you can see what I mean~

 

pot17.jpg

 

Here's the video of the method I'm talking about~

 

http://www.youtube.com/v/flXSxrQxW9s&hl=en&fs=1

post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 

My understanding is that stollens are produced by the buried stem, as well as in the root system. Darrell's point, I think, is that while this happens, it only does so in the first ten inches. And, therefore, there's no reason to hill more than that.

 

I would guess that if he's correct, you'd also get better production (that is, both more, and larger potatoes) because with more foliage the plant can convert that much more sunlight. And, let's face it, that's all a potato is: a plant's way of storing sunlight and water.

 

Traditionally, the way hilling was done (whether in-ground or above-ground) is that you let the plant grow 8 inches, and then bury the bottom 4 inches of it. Let it grow again until there is 8 inches, and bury the bottom 4. Etc.

 

According to the literature and other authorities, if you grow in a tower (such as the bamboo one in that video) you could fill it to the top, and would have spuds throughout the whole thing. My experience is different. Most of the potatoes were found amidst the root system, and in the first layer or two of added planting mix.

 

HDRA did massive experimenting with "soilless" growing. They found if you hilled just with straw the potatoes would happily grow in it. So long as you kept direct sunlight off the tubers there'd be no problems. I tried that one year, with mixed results. Again, the potatoes were primarily at the bottoms of the plants. The advantage, if you see it as such, was that all the potatoes were above ground, and clean of dirt. And, in theory at least, harvesting was easier.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 29

KY, we're in agreement on this. If you were to fill a 4 foot tower 2/3 full to begin with, then added dirt to cover the seed potatoes, you could probably only add about 8 more inches of dirt before you'd compromise the stability of the framework, especially if it were made of bamboo shades. I'd be afraid to fill it plumb to the top. I will probably use mostly, if not all, peat moss to add to it, but will use SFG mix to plant in initially.

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 

Alternatively, what if you divided the shades the long way? That would give you two 2-foot towers. With the same investment in planting mix you would basicallyi double production.

 

There was, for awhile, I guy selling "potato towers". These were, essentially, a sheet of perforated plastic which, when bent into a cylinder, formed a tower 22 inches high. That's what I used to try the above-ground method, and it worked very well. I have friends who do the same thing by piling two automobile tires atop each other.

 

Another trick is to cut a 55-gallon plastic drum into rings. You get three such rings from a drum, and they work really well as general mini-beds. No reason they shouldn't work for potatoes.

 

I have friends who, one year, grew potatoes in a leaf-filled tower made from chicken wire. I never actually saw the set-up, but they say it worked very well.

 

So, it seems to me, above-ground growing is a fully established system. And the key to it is using a medium that assures the developing spuds do not get exposed to direct sunlight.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 29

The problem I've seen with the no-till potatoes is that the true roots don't have space to develop. The seed potatoes sit on untilled ground and the methods I've seen depend entirely on potatoes that develop at seed potato level or above. Problem is, the plant needs the true roots to provide enough moisture and water-soluble nutrients. How much loose soil would a plant need below the seed potato to develop those roots? I'm guessing it would need soil about equal to the height of the mature plant.

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

 I've been promised seed for a Cherokee variety that comes right from the reservation. If that arrives, it will be one of them for sure. And probably Red Striped Greasy, which is our usual main-crop.

 



On their way to you today, as promised. 

 

I haven't made my official list yet but I'll certainly be growing eggplant, red onion, yellow squash, zucchini, cucumbers, tomatoes, Anaheim peppers and the 'Seven Beans'.  I grew all these last year so I'd like to add one new thing to my list for this year, just haven't decided what it will be yet.

 

CB

I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
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post #15 of 29

There is nothing much growing in my garden at the moment mad.gif

 

It's been flooded for just over 3 weeks and just been dry again for 1 week.

Not many crops seem to like that!

 

My avocado died, so did my ginger....

The lemon grass is still alive. I'm probably going to have to trim that one a bit....

There are some sprigs of chives visible, which surprises me as I didn't think that was hardy at all.

The mint is starting to come back.....

 

Basil, thyme, chili's,.... all gone

 

And we might flood again in a couple of weeks

Despite that, I'm going to plant again (and again if necessary)

Already planted some ginger again and am going to follow up with some coriander and basil.............

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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---Anonymus---

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post #16 of 29

Have ended up doing a poted garden on a table this year.  Too many snail, slugs etc and pets live here, so, no poisons.

 

Tomato plants:  Roma and Cherry.  They're not going too well, it's been very wet and not very hot.  Next year maybe.

 

Sugar snap peas (mange tout): just planted seeds a week ago and they are going nuts!  Every morning they're a centimetre taller and starting to get tendrils already.

 

Flat leaf parsley: it really is taking off, but looks nothing like parsley.  Kinda weird.  It shall reveal itself eventually :)

 

Nothing else planted yet, but hoping to do some more soon.  Rosemary still going great guns from the original clipping.  I'll bung some more clippings in soon before it gets too cold.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #17 of 29

I'm going to try my hand at a kitchen garden this year.  A neighbour posted on FB the link for a kitchen garden website and the movement is to encourage people to grow some of their own food. 

 

I have a postage stamp sized backyard (literally) so most of what I do is going to be in containers.  I've been looking at the organic seeds at the market and so far I've decided on plum tomatoes, carrots, beets, peas, snap peas, beans, picking cukes, likely English cucumbers and pumpkin.  I might do butternut squash as well but I'm not 100% sure on that.  I'm also planning on basil, oregano, thyme, rosemary, chives, sage and curry if I can find it.

 

Our plant date is the long weekend in May so I'll be starting my seeds indoors more than likely at the end of this month and beginning to harden them off in early May. 

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post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 

Go for it, Leniek.

 

Just be careful not to go overboard your first year, which can lead to discouragement. I'm thinking you're taking an awfully big bite with that list.

 

Also, watch the culturing requirements of the various plant types. For instance, pumpkins and butternut squash grow on rampant vines, and are not the best choice for a small area. While it's possible to grow English cucumbers outdoors they are actually designed for greenhouse growing. Peas are cold hardy plants. However, while snap peas are heat tolerant, English peas are not, so your planting times can be affected. If you're starting tomatoes from seed they must be set, indoors, six-eight weeks before last frost. As a first-timer, you might be better off waiting until bedding plants are available and go with them instead. Etc.

 

A good example is your specifying the long weekend in May as your planting date. More than likely that applies to when you can put tender plants in the ground (i.e, tomato plants, cucumber seed). Your hardy stuff should be planted long before that. For instance, beets and carrots go in 4-6 weeks before last frost, peas as much as 8 weeks before. Etc. 

 

I notice you specified organic seed. Is there a reason for that? Other than price, there is virtually no difference between organic and standard seed.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 

I have just been hired to run the gardens at Fort Boonesboro State Park---a living history museum based in a reproduction of the original fort. My mandate is to make the gardens as historically correct as possible; something that, until now, has not been the case.

 

In addition to the main vegetable garden there are flower beds under the windows at each cabin. These are in modern cultivars, now. My plan is to convert them to herbs and dye plants.

 

There are, too, a couple of in-the-planning-stages projects. One is to open a large cornfield outside the fort walls. I'll go with a Three-Sisters planting instead, for obvious reasons. The other is to begin an 18-century tobacco culturing demo.

 

Icing on the cake: Friend Wife has been brought in to demo and discuss cookery and related kitchen tasks. She and I will share a cabin as our base for this. In effect, we'll be in charge of all the historic foodways at the fort.

 

For me this is the culmination of 20 years studying the foodways of the period (1760-1790), and I haven't been this excited about anything in a long time. So just wanted to share.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #20 of 29

KYH your new job sounds really exciting!  I can't wait to hear about it as you get going with it!

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post #21 of 29

KYH, the difference between the organic seeds and the conventional ones is shelf life.  They have a use by Dec 2012 shelf life so I can use some of them now, and save some for next year.  The vendor I bought them from sells them for the same price as the conventional seeds he carries, so for me there was no difference in price at all.  I have bought some conventional ones as well. 

 

I've only started six seeds from each packet so far.  Depending on my luck with those I may leave it as is or start more outside.  I do have a good sized front yard (I suspect it is bigger than the back) and I do plan on growing some vegetables out there as well.  This year will mark the transition of the front garden from ornamental annuals to perennials that can be used (lemon balm, coneflower, chocolate mint to name a few) as well as sunflowers and nasturtiums so I am going to put some vegetables out there as well.  We back onto an alley and it is shared between the four houses in our row (we have a 130+ year old Victorian rowhouse) so I can put some containers back there as well. (I'll be joining the neighbours who do the same)  I'm saving margarine buckets from work.. they can easily have holes put in them for drainage and are deep enough to comfortably hold plants and supports if need be.  I decided against English cucumbers and went for pickling cucumbers instead.  I want to try making relish as well as pickles this  year so we'll see how that goes.  The only thing I will more than likely plant the entire seed packed of is roma tomatoes.  I love homemade stewed tomatoes and can't get enough of them.  (it might be easier to do them as they ripen too instead of by the bushel in the fall)

 

I'm sure I will be back with more questions as the growing season goes on!

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post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

Sounds like you're well on your way.

 

With the marjarine tubs, the easiest way to put drainage holes in them is to stack them, upside down. The heat a metal skewer. It'll melt right through the stacked tubs.

 

Don't know exactly how far it will go. With yogurt containers I stack 10-12 at a time, and burn five holes through the stack before returning the skewer to the heat. The plastic used for mushrooms and such go almost as far with each heating. I stack six of them, and put 8 holes through the stack before returning the skewer to the heat.

 

As to expiration dates, this is a family location so I won't tell you what I think of that explanation. If it's true then your dealer is selling you old seed.

 

Every vegetable seed has a viability period measured in years. F'rinstance, cucumber seed, when stored properly, will remain viable for ten years. That doesn't mean it won't grow after ten years. What it means is at the end of the period 50% or less of the seed will germinate.

 

This applies whether the seed is open pollinated or hybrid.

 

I can't speak for the rules in Canada. In the U.S. there's no such thing as an expiration date on seeds. Commercial seeds are supposed to be marked with the year the seed was grown (although, realistically, it's usually the year of packaging---which, almost always, amounts to the same thing). And it has to meet the Federal guidelines for viability. F'rinstance, with tomatoes, at least 75% of the seed should germinate. If it doesn't, they have to mark it so on the package, and increase the amount of seed to make up for it.

 

What I'm saying is that if you have both conventional seed and organic seed of a variety, and they were both grown last year, there should be absolutely no difference in viability and germination rates.

 

As a rule, and onion seed excepted, you can always get at least a second year from any commercial seed you buy.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 

I can't wait to hear about it as you get going with it!

 

Ya know, this all reminds me of the story General Joe Engles tells. He drags it out, but in brief, he tells of how, as a boy on the farm, he'd watch the planes overhead and dream of becoming a pilot. Comes a day when a man from the Air Force comes and says, "boy, we gonna teach you to fly." Which they did. Sent him to school to be a fighter pilot.

 

"And you know what," General Joe says, conspiratorily, "they actuall paid me to do that."

 

Then comes the time they told him, "boy, we gonna make you into a test pilot."

Which they did. And he spent his time putting brand new experimental aircraft to the test during the day, and wowing the girls with his exploits at night..

 

"And you know what? They still paid me."

 

Finally they tell him, "boy, we gonna send you out in space."

 

Which they did. General Joe was one of the few in the Air Force Man In Space program to actually go up in a rocket.

 

"And they still paid me," he says. Then he looks around, makes a shushing gesture against his lips, and says, "don't tell anybody, but I'd have paid them!"

 

That's kind of how I feel. I'm going to run an historically correct garden, making virtually all the decisions about it. And they're going to pay me to do it!

 

Don't tell them, but.......

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #24 of 29

KYH - that's great news - congratulations! and a very amusing  story :)  I'm sure we won't tell them....

 

It's a great challenge to take on - I'm sure you'll love it.  Go well.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #25 of 29

Ok KYH your secret is safe here!  Great story and thanks for the laugh!

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post #26 of 29

Thanks for the tip, KYH on the margarine buckets... I was just going to use a hammer and a screwdriver but the heated skewer sounds much more efficient.

 

Everything seems to have an expiry date here... I have even seen it on bottled water.  I suspect it's a marketing tactic but what I do I know?  I just looked at the plant by dates on the packets and went from there knowing I wouldn't use all of the seeds this year.  The vendor I bought them from is quite reputable and I do buy alot of produce from him as well.  Hands down he has the best selection of vegetables on the farmers market and I use him and another vendor almost exclusively.  The other vendor I remember from when I was a kid and my mom would take me to the market, but I digress...

 

So far my seeds aren't doing anything but I only started them on Saturday so I know it's a bit early.  The only thing I have noticed is a bit of mould I think (?) on the basil but I'm not 100% sure on that.

If I started duds I can always try again and worst case I can get bedding plants...

 

I have decided that corn and sunflowers will grow out front close to the house as they are the tallest and then I will plant other things according to size so at least the front garden looks pretty.  My neighbourhood is mostly made up of Italian and Portugese immigrants and they love to see a nice garden in the front of the house.  When we first bought the house alot of them stopped by when I made the garden out front... this house was a rental before we bought it and the tenants took very poor care of the yards and I think it impressed them that we took interest in how our house looks. I love lilacs and I still want to keep my lilac bush though so the corn and sunflowers will have to share a bit of space. 

 

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post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 

Yeah, that's a great story. Was even better when General Joe told it. Just imagine taking a natural storyteller (which he is) and running him through NASA's PR school. I can listen to the result forever without getting bored.

 

Anyway, on expiration dates. Here in the States they are not about marketing, but about paternalistic government rules. All foodstufs require an expiration or use-by date, most of which are set fairly arbitrarily. Check out whole spices, for instance. By their very nature they do not go bad. Yet they have expiration dates.

 

And anyone in a non-professional environment who disposes of dairy products just because they've "expired" has more money than brains, IMO.

 

Leniek: If mold is, indeed, showing up, try this: Sprinkle the surface with powdered cinnamon. And try bottom watering. Mold, per se, isn't necessarily a problem except that it indicates the presence of fungal spores. And damping off is the result of a fungal infection, which is avoidable merely by keeping the seed-starting media's surface on the dry side.

 

Watering can be ticklish anyway, as the tendency on the part of most people is to over-water. You want the mix to be about the same moisture leel as a well wrung-out sponge.

 

And have patience. It takes awhile for seeds to germinate. Tomatoes, for instance, typically take a week to ten days. Peppers average 21 days and can stretch to six weeks. And so on.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #28 of 29

I tend to ignore expiration dates at home and I use what my mother and mother in law taught me... if it is not growing or curdled it is still edible...  I worked at a workplace cafeteria a few years ago and the chef there employed the same rule when it came to dates.  I'm not comfortable doing that at work but we also make sure we don't over order so things do not expire before we  use them. 

 

Thanks for the tip with the mould.. I do suspect it happened because of too much moisture in the peat puck.  My lettuce has started to sprout and I am seeing action with the beans and peas too.

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post #29 of 29

I agree about the expiration dates - if it ain't grown legs or gone green, it's edible heh.  This is done sensibly as we all do - you get to know what's off and what's not.

 

The seeds I planted were supposed to be used 5 years ago.  They're going great.  So I may play with a few more of them.  Got some kohl rabi I'm interested in, also capsicums, radishes, and other things.  Fingers crossed.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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