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Rendered fat and pepper

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I was wondering if I mixed rendered fat, lots of pepper and some spices could I slow age (even slower) a piece of steak or lamb by coating and storing it in the fridge or cool room. Obviously the colligen will slowly break down, but I was wandering would I need to salt the meat first to draw out excess moisture or perhaps pre age the meat then add the rendered fat. I am just thinking out loud but would be interested to here other thoughts.

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post #2 of 4

Gareth, am thinking that would be more of a marinade than the aging process which is something totally different again.  I would marinade like that for 36 hours max. 

 

Plenty of aging threads in here if you want to do a search.  Aging is dry, not wet.  Needs constant temperature and no covering on the meat, and a plastic rack to hold it out of any meat juices.  I'm no expert by far, perhaps someone else with more experience can hop in and comment.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thanks DC, I was wondering about this method because it is not dry ageing as you pointed out but it's also not dehydrating like prosciutto, it doesn't use pink salt (sodium nitrite) to dehydrate and protect against the really bad guys, and it's not as organic as jugged hare.

 

So in my mind it is possible, but how to, and safely (hence the pepper) and a little (table) salting first. Might have to play around and send some of the results through when I'm done. Won't do it in the next 2 weeks but will wait till I finish the next batch of aged sauce when I'm getting the bacteria counts done.

 

Will try to track down some of those other threads. Thanks

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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

We did the trials and unless you have a lab as part of the kitchen dont go here. Far to complicated, far too many bad results but when you get a good one it's amazing. Any way bottom line is that this method is not commercially viable and that you would get 99% of the meat actually start to go off within 3 days. The rotting is mainly due to cross contamination but you just cant help that in a kitchen some times.

 

I think the simple explanation is the meat needs to dry at a particular rate. If not it decomposes.

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