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Which cut of beef

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

hey all , I hope some can share their input here , concerning which cut of beef and why .

beef break down , Currently we are using AA striploin , it seems too touchy some shrink lots , and not at all , some times our residents are happy but most times it's too tough for them. ( cooking for seniors) 

My chef is currently away on medical leave and this has been tossed in to my lap and have been asked to deal with it . 

I have talked with the meat supplier and asked him what some of the other chef with in the company are using , i was then told most have upped there meats to Angus beef and AAA , some are using most are using Inside rounds , and some are using a sirloin .

 

reading up on cuts starts to hurt the head . since we have so many issues as it is , I don't think going to a inside round will solve the issues but isn't a striploin the same as sirloin  am hearing mixed answers about this .

will going  to AAA angus top sirloin help ? i've been told not to touch prime rib it's not in our budget .

 

I would like to hear other types of beef that you serve and why ? 

post #2 of 12

It's just not that simple!

Breed does play a part. There are only three breeds of bovine that are scientifically proven to be better than the rest, then you've got food they ate, genetics, husbandry, weather, how far to the abbs, how stressed, etc and that's before you start talking about cuts of meat. 

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post #3 of 12

If I were you I would use a flatiron. Its cheaper and the correct size and fairly lean. You can buy them tenderized as you can buy strips tenderized. For seniors teeth and chewing become a problem, portions can be small as they are older. I would not buy Angus.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 12

I don't understand why you are only focussed on sirloin and now Angus to feed senior residents. If I'm not mistaken, I've seen more dishes served to these people made from much cheaper and tougher cuts and turned into a delicious tender stew.

post #5 of 12

Maybe I've missed it, but how are you cooking said beef?

 

IMHO, there is NO one cut of beef that is better than another for ALL applications, each cut has a role and must be handled properly to achieve the maximum in flavor, texture, and tenderness, or lack thereof as desired.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

oh my fault it's for a buffet ,family and residents , and am not sold on angus thats what my meat supplier said other buildings are doing, am thinking it's a bit of a hog wash.

am not hooked on sirloin either , but they do expect a nice tender roast , cooked med . I hope this clear things up . and a stew just wont do the job for them on  buffet .

post #7 of 12

I can't see how any cut of meat, other then Beef Tenderloin would be easy for seniors to chew. When I was a chef in a Hospital (Years ago) I would always have the meat in a sauce, like Pepper steak, Stroganoff, Beef stew and so on. I would splurge and give them Beef Medallions Bearnaise, Petite 5oz Fillet and so on. I would only use cuts that you can almost cut with a fork, The choppers ain't what they used to be..............................CBB

post #8 of 12

Black Angus from what I understand is a Registered Trademark. You must pay to use the term on your product, you then become a licensee. I dont think you need that for Us Old Folk., just cook meat corectly and you will be fine and  you will have a happy bunch of campers and a lower food cost.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 12

HI Sous, I have cooked all kinds of large roasts for years, Top Rounds, Baron of beef, Roast Sirloins. The only thing I can tell you is to carve it to order and as thin as possible. I still use Top Round for all of my Roast beef needs, French Dips, Hot beef sands, Hot Roast beef and swiss Hoagie melts, Carved Roast Beef, and so on. To me the secret has always been to slice it thin.........................ChefBillyB

post #10 of 12

I'm with ChefBilly, I use a choice top round for my roast beef needs, cooked low and slow, sliced thin it's pretty tender. And at about $2.40lb is cost effective. A hell of a lot cheaper than strip loin for roast beef!

post #11 of 12

My husband loves roast beef, and I don't like to pay top dollar for ribeye (I usually buy it bone-in) and then have a lot of waste to trim off. I've read elsewhere here at Chef Talk to use top round or top sirloin, roast it low and slow, and slice it thinly. I can get several meals out of one roast; my FoodSaver helps. As a home cook that was a valuable lesson.

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post #12 of 12

McGee is a great source of info for slow roasting, check it out on the net. I love the rolled roast slow cooked, very tasty and tender if you do it right.

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