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Kiwi brand knives - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

 

I smell a kindred spirit.

 

BDL


That kind sir is the smell of Kiwi success :D   ok I will stop now . 

post #32 of 44

So that's what success smells like.  I thought it was cabbage.

 

BDL

post #33 of 44

I have several and they are amazing. I have a santoku, an usubu nakiri, and a "utility",  They are amazingly sharp and hold an edge.  The tang is short and a pinch grip is mandatory to keep from breaking the handle. I've given some as gifts and they get good reviews.  The best feature, however, is the price.  I buy them at the Wok Shop on Grant in China Town in San Francisco for $4.95 each.  They are light and convenient to pack and, at that price, expendable.  Go for it. Try one. I think you'll like it.

post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snappy Hat View Post


Kiwi knives have changed my life.    My teeth are whiter, my clothes brighter , my car runs faster, girls throw themselves at me and I just won a lottery.

 

When I used just my MACs and Wusthofs my wife left me , my dog would bite me whilst I  slept and my house caught on fire..

 

No more now that I own a light as air sharper than sharp Kiwi .      


lol.gif

post #35 of 44

Kiwi brand knives are good. Also, Kiwi Pro Slicer / Peeler No. 218.

post #36 of 44

Sandy, 

 

do not sharpen Kiwi knives on a stone, you will lose the edge, bits will break off.  I hone my kiwi knives (No 193 about 7 inch with black plastic handle) with honing compound (on leather glued to a bit of wood). If the edge gets really torn up (with bent over bits visible), I can hone the edge back to use, but use anything harder with caution.  

 

I must confess though, that I use the knives for whittling.  Two have migrated to the kitchen, and are now classified as house cooking knives, but the other 38 have been cut down (on a bench grinder) to 45mm.  

 

I am part of the South Australian Scout Whittling team, and we introduced these knives last outing (College Park, 16 cubs (8-10 yo) 2 hours, no bandaids, (that is, no cuts)), and the cub scouts got further along with their carvings.  Kiwi knives are better than the two types of knife we used before.  The first batch was anything I could find in Op-shops (Australian charity shop selling donated goods.).  I found many knives labelled either 'China' or nothing, and steel quality was totally unpredictable.  I cut most of them down using a hacksaw, and learnt to discard any that cut too easily.  The second were 1970s whiltshire steel knives.  They are thick, hard to manouvre through the wood, but were cheap, and could hold an edge all weekend at a Branch event (when we teach 250 scouts (in groups of 25))

 

I personally have whittled with Kiwi 193 knives for two years, the rest of the team for about a year, and in that time I have only destroyed one knife.  The edge of my first knife has failed, and I cannot seem to reset it.  I have tried a stone (and found that I should not have), a diamond sharpener, and a honing wheel on a bench grinder.  I think once a kiwi loses its edge, it may have to be thrown out.    I really abused that knife, it was my main carving and whittling knife for about 18 months.  But at A$2.00 per knife, I can replace any whose edges fail. 

 

 

The tang seems to be quite short.  One uncut 193 I use for carving has the tang 'risen out' (metal visible, plastic distorted, but still holding).  I have not pulled a blade out yet, so I do not know what length the tang of the 193 is.   

 

I buy them at the Asian Supermarket (Kim Wah) at Adelaide Central Markets.  

post #37 of 44
"Do not sharpen Kiwi knives on a
stone, you will lose the edge, bits
will break off."
Is this to be taken seriously? What kind of miraculous steel has been used that can't be sharpened on stones?
post #38 of 44

Benuser, 

 

I lost the edge off a 193 kiwi trying to sharpen it on a coarse stone.  I have been unable to do the same re-shaping of the cutting edge that I do with other knives.  I feel that the edges are delicate, can be resharpened many times, but having lost its edge (after wood carving) and trying to reset it, and failing I am of the opinion that Kiwis have a great edge, but either I did the wrong thing, or the thin kiwi edges that come out of the factory are hard to replicate at home...

post #39 of 44
Sorry to hear about your bad experience, but any edge can be reproduced, with the right stones and right technique. I guess too much pressure was involved, and a much too great angle. Try it again, and make sure you hit only the part immediately behind the edge, and go on from there, until you raise a burr.
post #40 of 44

I've used them for the last 16 years at work and at home. Even though the are light in weight, they are good to use, easy to sharpen and stay sharp. I have a wide collection of them and frankly they are just as good as any expensive knife.

post #41 of 44

Since time immemorial people have made up aliases just to play the game of one-time-poster - and to resurrect a great line:

 

 

Rick

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snappy Hat View Post
 


Kiwi knives have changed my life.    My teeth are whiter, my clothes brighter , my car runs faster, girls throw themselves at me and I just won a lottery.

 

When I used just my MACs and Wusthofs my wife left me , my dog would bite me whilst I  slept and my house caught on fire..

 

No more now that I own a light as air sharper than sharp Kiwi .      

post #42 of 44
I have used nearly all the fancy knives out there from Wusthoff and Henkel and Mac, and I have a knife case with several knives of different brands. I picked up a Kiwi knife at the Asian store near my house and I must say, it is my go to knife for chopping vegetables and butchering lighter meats like pork and chicken. The blade is thin and sharp, and somewhat flexible so it "gives" when it needs to.
Just like the favorite shirt in the closet that you always wear, despite owning nicer shirts, it turns out to be the one that I use most. I think I paid 7 dollars for it, and have used it for several years. I am going back to see if they still carry it. Don't know why I need two, but I just love it, and maybe I'll give them as gifts for the next holiday go round.
You should get one and try it.
Another go to, for a bigger chefs knife, also inexpensive, is the Dexter Russel. Sometimes called Forstner. With the white rubber handle.
post #43 of 44

Just an ultra-quick reply (I've got laundry in the dryer) about Dexter Russell and Forschners.

 

Dexter Russell is an American cutlery manufacturer, which specializes in commercial cutlery.  Forschner is an older brand name for what are now known as Victorinox commercial knives.  There is no corporate or trade linkage between Dexter Russell and Victorinox.

 

Forschner is an older name for Victorinox commercial cutlery.  The original Forschner firm was the American importer/distributor for Victorinox commercial knives (Victorinox being a Swiss company) and the Forschner name and logo were printed on the blades.  Later, Victorinox bought out the Forschner company's American owners, and continued the use of the Forschner name.  Nowadays, though, Victorinox has dropped the Forschner name and substituted the Victorinox name and the "Swiss Army" name.

 

Victorinoxes use Thuyssen/Krupp 4116 steel (aka "X50CrMoV15") - the same as a lot of upper end German cutlery lines.  What Dexter Russell uses, I don't know, but it's not 4116 steel.

 

GS

 

...and now to my laundry...

post #44 of 44

Welcome to Cheftalk chefjudge.

 

I also have a number of cheap stainless knives, most of which I have lovingly thinned, otherwise modified, and all appropriately sharpened, and also get a kick out of using them when better is not needed.

 

 

 

Rick

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