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Red snapper

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

My wholesaler has what appears to be whole fresh red snapper each and every weekend and since I'm running out of fish that my lovely wife will eat, I'm looking for new species and this seems to be next. They may be frozen but the eyes are always clear and the fish overall doesn't seem "fishy" so I'm interested.

 

I've done a little research here and have come across the 'salt dome' method (doesn't that make the fish salty?) and a few other methods so I'm looking for ideas. Not much for snapper specifically though. I know, what works for one may not work for another.  

 

So, what do I do with a whole red snapper, head, tail and all in between?

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #2 of 28

Why not filet if you have the skills?  If not have the fish monger filet and skin it?  If he won't find somewhere else to buy your fish. The only whole fish I will mess with is sand dabs... but if I had a whole snapper I might grill it.

 

A nice simple way I like to prepare snapper, rock or ling cod  is to braise with leeks, mushrooms & garlic, with a bit of white wine & lemon.  When the fish is cooked, remove from the pan and reduce the cooking liquid with the leeks & mushrooms and finish with a little butter and parsley. Simple, quick and good.

post #3 of 28
Salt crusting is an interesting technique, redvan, which does not make the fish particularly salty. Basically you're just entombing it in a solid shell that helps maintain its moisture.

Red Snapper is one of the more commonly used fish, and there are, literally, thousands of recipe. Whole snapper is an ideal choice for grilling, for instance.

For indoors, you might try this recipe, which came out of an old Gourmet magazine:

Red Snapper with Fennel Butter

Have the fishmonger clean six 12-ounce red snappers leaving hte heads and tails intact.

Make the fennel butter: In a bowl blend 1 1/2 sticks or 3/4 cup butter, softened, with 1 teaspoon each of crushed fennel seed and lemon juice, 1/8 teaspoon crushed garlic, and salt and pepper to taste.

Spread the interiours of the fish with half of the butter. In a shallow dish combine 1/4 cup olive oil, 1 tablespoon grated lemon rind, 1/4 teaspoon thyme, and salt and pepper to taste. Add the fish and let them marinate, turning them once, for 1 hour. Drain the fish, put them on the rack of a broiler pan, and broil lthem under a preheated broiler, basting them frequently with the marinade, for 5 minutes on each side. Arrange the fish on a serving platter and decorate the cavities with fennel tops if available. Garnish the platter with lemon halves and serve the remaining fennel butter separately.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 28

I deal with about 40 varieties of fish they come in as is and we butcher them. Beware there is Red Snapper and then there is Red Snapper. The Snapper off coast of Florida is wonderful. light and not a real fishy taste. The sanpper from the Chilian or Pan amanian or Brazilian  waters are very fishy tasting and a  much darker color..

Other fish you may want to try are. Cobia, Wahoo, Hawian Tuna, Halibut, Haddock, Wild King Salmon, Yellow Tail  all of these are really good and can be cooked in many ways..

Give you a crazy one  Take a piece of snapper just top with Russian Dressing put on a sizzler pan  a little wine and lemon juice on pan under fiilet and broil then finish in oven sounds  crazy but delicious and easy.. Its easy to take skin off. just insert sharp knife near tip of tail between flesh and skin and move knife along the skin up toward  head end..holding skin with free hand..

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 28


 Image



 



 



This is a picture of Huachinago ( Red Snapper Zarandeado also spelled Sarandeado, I have had this in Mexico many times. Look for a Recipe on the Internet that fits the spices you can find in your area. This is basically a Grilled fish with a eatable crispy crust and tender flaky inside flesh...............The best...................ChefBillyB................P.S. If I remember correctly, BDL may have  a recipe for this dish.



 



 


Edited by ChefBillyB - 3/2/11 at 9:08am
post #6 of 28

I enjoy taking the whole red snapper and scoring both sides, dredging it in corn meal then deep fat frying it until crispy. the presentation is beautiful especially if you position the fish in the fryer basket as if it were swimming then placing it on the platter straight up rather then lying on its' side. You can go crazy with just about any seasoning in the corn meal. Even a tempura batter would work.

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 

ChefBuba,

Thanks, sounds simple and delicious, like you said.

 

 

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

KYHeirloomer,

Wow, your recipe sounds fantastic, dripping with butter (one of my favorite foods) and fairly simple.

 

Thanks,

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

chefedb,

So I should away from fish from those waters, hmm. This might be difficult as what I saw didn't say where it was from and since I have only seen it at this wholesaler, I can't be sure if what I'm looking at is the lighter or darker fish. I have nothing to gauge it against. I guess the proof is in the pudding, I'll have to purchase one or two and see how they turn out.

 

As for the other varieties; I see Halibut occasionally, fresh Tuna she's not crazy about or Salmon, any type. Wahoo I've never heard of, I'll have to look out for that one. Cobia I've heard of but never seen. Selection in the island is limited at beat.

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 

ChefBillyB,

The wife doesn't care much for blackened-like dishes (she's so boring at times). I've looked on the internat but decided this would be a better resource as I've always found what I was looking for here and, usually tried and tested, which is the best test.

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 

Chefross,

You've hit upon something she likes....

 

Anything fried is ok with her (who doesn't love fried fish, wow!) SHe also loves tempura.

 

Thanks,

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvan View Post

chefedb,

So I should away from fish from those waters, hmm. This might be difficult as what I saw didn't say where it was from and since I have only seen it at this wholesaler, I can't be sure if what I'm looking at is the lighter or darker fish. I have nothing to gauge it against. I guess the proof is in the pudding, I'll have to purchase one or two and see how they turn out.

 

As for the other varieties; I see Halibut occasionally, fresh Tuna she's not crazy about or Salmon, any type. Wahoo I've never heard of, I'll have to look out for that one. Cobia I've heard of but never seen. Selection in the island is limited at beat.

 

Red.



REDVAN   Try calling  Slavin Fish  in Brooklyn NY. When I lived their Barry Slavin could get anything you wanted.  Most of it today comes from Chili as we try and keep the Florida Snapper here. Also try  Yellow Tail  a lot like snapper. Where in Queens do you live, I lived in Forest Hills then Breezy Point. befor migrating here.

 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 

chefedb,

I'm in Bellerose Manor, over near Creedmore psychiatric hospital.

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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #14 of 28

It is, indeed, a small world, Redvan. I used to live in Queens Village---born and bred a Brooklyn lad, but moved out there when I was 12.

 

Don't imagine I'd recognize any of those areas anymore, though. Been four decades since I lived in the Big Apple.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #15 of 28

How about that....I lived in Flushing Meadows for the first 13 years of my life. It truly IS a small world.

post #16 of 28


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

How about that....I lived in Flushing Meadows for the first 13 years of my life. It truly IS a small world.

I m telling about the Red Snapper,
 

The red snapper commonly inhabits waters from 30–200 feet (9.1–61 m), but can be caught as deep as 300 ft (91 m) on occasion. A red snapper attains sexual maturity at 2–5 years old and an adult snapper can live for more than 50 years

post #17 of 28

I worked in Flushing Meadows(Corona) for years.  was Ex Chef at Terrace on the Park in its hayday.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #18 of 28

Hi Red, Try doing a Crab stuffed Sole with either Bearnaise or Hollandaise sauce. I think the price of Dover sole is pretty high so if you can find a thin small flake fish fillet then use that. The Crab stuffing will be lump crab meat, bread crumbs, lemon zest, old bay, chopped green onion, mustard, I use melted butter to bind it together, most use mayo, season to your own liking. This dish cooks fast because of the this small flake fish, the stuffing just needs to heat and combine the flavors. The picture shows Asparagus, try it with or without. This dish will be enjoyed by people that don't really like fish, this will get you off the couch and back in the bedroom.....................The best...................ChefBillyB....................................Photo from AOL picture file

stuffed5.jpg

post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 

Awesome ChefBillyB, simply awesome, thanks!

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

I was born in Rockville Centre, raised in West Hempstead until dad lost his butcher shop in Baldwin to Pathmark 3 blocks down from his shop. Then, Franklin Square was my home until mom died, then to Lynbrook. Valley Stream was my first apartment and finally Queens...... There you have it, a life story in less than 50 words.cool.gif

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #21 of 28

Wow I didn't know there were so many Queens ex neighbors here.  I'm in Astoria with all the other greeks.  Crazy small world.

 

Red snapper is one of my favorites.  I like it grilled whole and then served with a gremolata (finely chopped scallion or shallots, lemon zest, and parsley) and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

 

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #22 of 28

I bought some English Sole today $6.47 lb, I then made a Crab stuffing with Crab, Bread crumbs, Mayo, Chopped Green onion, Parsley flakes, Dijon mustard, Tony's Chachere's creole Sea, ( Old bay if you have it) Granulated garlic, fresh squeezed lemon juice.

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I'll be baking this at 375 degree just until the inside is hot and the outside is flaky, it doesn't take long. I'll put this stuffed Sole on some Bearnaise Sauce, serve with fresh broccoli w/ Roasted Red pepper Coulis. homemade Caesar salad.

 

 

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post #23 of 28

Chef Billy want to try a strange sounding but delicious way... Stuff the sole with 3 or 4 Melon Balls top with some russian dressing and bake. At first I thought crazy but then a lot of my ladies luncheons asked for it and loved it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #24 of 28

As a non-professional, I’d like to throw in my two cents on this one.  People in my house aren’t wild about fish, or should I say “fishy“ tasting fish.  I make Fish in the Vera Cruz style with loads of goodies (canned tomatoes, onion, garlic, green olives, carrots, celery, chopped green chilies, red bell peppers) and no one even notices that they are eating fish.  You can use whatever you have in the pantry/frig.  I like to make life easy by making up the sauce portion of the dish and then add cubed white fleshed fish (I use Red Snapper here in AZ) to “poach”, then serve it over steamed rice.

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 

Kaneohegirlinaz,

Sounds like you're hiding the main ingredient, kind of sneaky but sounds interesting, I'll give it a whirl.

 

Thanks.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #26 of 28

Nope Redvan, that's pretty much it.  The less complicated, the better I say.  And, make it your own. 

If you "google" Red Snapper Vera Cruz, different recipes will give you different ingredients, but basicly it's what you like. 

We are allergic to capers, that's "suppose to be in the dish".  My Mother doesn't care for raisins, so I don't put them in. 

The major "ah-ha moment" I had is that recipes are just a guide line.  I'm the kind of home cook who's dishes are never the same twice!!


Edited by kaneohegirlinaz - 5/4/11 at 10:19pm

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #27 of 28

Crab-stuffed sole: whenever I've been served this there's been the problem that the fish is way overcooked by the time the filling is hot. A candidate for slow sous vide, maybe, followed by quickly searing the outside?

post #28 of 28

Heat stuffing then roll in fish then covered in oven in moist heat Pan with butter, lemon juice, white wine). unless your doing 100s of them

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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