or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cookin Scallops

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Where I work we blanch the scallops before using them. I was told that this is a very common practice, and that they will keep longer and cook better. Never really questioned it, but I was doing some online research & could not find any info on this.

 

So.. do you employ this technique? More importantly why? & what are some pros &  cons for blanched vs raw? - (pro&con is part of why isn't it?)

 

I gotta assume that if this where so common I would have heard about it before. Course, its not like I've been everywhere & seen everything!

A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 22

I am not a professional, but I've never blanched scallops.  Wouldn't that make them a little rubbery?

post #3 of 22

That sounds awful!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #4 of 22

Don't think you have to be a professional to know this is wrong.

You usually don't have to kill something 3 times to eat it.

pan

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #5 of 22

Never heard of it, wouldn't do it. I do not see any point to it whatosever.

 

 

post #6 of 22

A second thought:  surely the scallops would take up some of the water during the blanching period?

post #7 of 22

To do this to Scallops, is a  travesty. DO NOT DO IT ! and I don't know where it is common practice???

 

Thats why you can't find on line..

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 22

Scallops aren't sponges, they're muscle tissue. I'd figure blanching them would have the opposite effect... it would firm the muscle and drive moisture OUT of the flesh.

 

They cook so quickly... and can be overcooked so quickly... I just can't wrap my head around the concept.

post #9 of 22

My guess is this started as a way to extend their shelf life because someone somewhere didn't know how to order properly.  Either way though, I would never do this and have never heard of anyone doing this.  It makes absolutely no sense.  Don't do it!

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yeah this never seemed like a good idea to me. It really surpises me that this chef thinks its common & OK to do. I know he is smarter than this.

 

I wish I could change it, but that's not my place right now. I gotta support & uphold his standards. Maybe this can be a good story later.

 

Anyway at least I know that I'm not insane.

 

PS. Pete, I think you hit the nail on the head. He had some other reasons that I can't remember, but I'm sure he was just reaching to makes excuses.

A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
post #11 of 22

Reason is they were starting to go, so to extend life a day or to he blanched off..

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #12 of 22

You need to call Gordon Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

You need to call Gordon Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares.



Don't, he may stab you through the phone for this mortal sin..

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

You need to call Gordon Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares.



as far ashe goes,  I have heard that man talk about how scallops should never be soaked or blanched because they will take on some water, plumped, and not cook correctly.

post #15 of 22

Is he Chinese?

 

"Conpoy is produced by cooking raw scallops and then drying them. "

 

dcarch

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparkie View Post

Yeah this never seemed like a good idea to me. It really surpises me that this chef thinks its common & OK to do. I know he is smarter than this.

 

I wish I could change it, but that's not my place right now. I gotta support & uphold his standards. Maybe this can be a good story later.

 

Anyway at least I know that I'm not insane.

 

PS. Pete, I think you hit the nail on the head. He had some other reasons that I can't remember, but I'm sure he was just reaching to makes excuses.



Sparkie !. If he lets people do this and trains and tells  them this way, then I am sorry but there are no standards to uphold.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #17 of 22

I looked at their menu, they only have scallops in one dish ( Mixed Seafood dish ) If your only using them in one dish, you don't really need them on the menu. The menu they have is large enough as it is, this is the problem with not using fresh seafood multiple times on your menu or in specials.........ChefBillyB


Edited by ChefBillyB - 3/4/11 at 8:52am
post #18 of 22

Sparkle,

 

I'm just guessing that you do not use dry-pack scallops and the blanching is an effort to eliminate the sodium tryphosphate.

post #19 of 22

I would never blanch scalops. I've never heard of anybody doing it either. I don't even like it when people wash oysters. I think one of the best things about seafood is that fresh salty sea taste.


 

 

post #20 of 22

Yea it's bad.  I'm imagining blanching my ribeye steak before I grill it.  Ooof!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 

Sorry, been busy. It might take me a while to address everything I want to.  Kou & CB, you guys are funny! I'll be sure to use the speaker phone if I gotta call Chef Ramsay. Thanx for really putting this into perspective w/ your comment about the ribeye! That just gives me the chills.

 

Tim - I'm not sure. They come from Naked Scallops. I believe that wet-pack scallops have to be labeled as such. The one's we use are not.

 

Nice research Billy! You are absolutely right. Although we do use the scallops in specials to help move them, having them in only one dish is not enough. He actually added a scallop app last week. Kinda wish I coulda got into his ear to just drop the scallops all together. Interestingly enough, this seafood pasta is a top seller. I haven't heard any complaints for the scallops in general, but this method, messed up as it is, hasn't turned anybody away. My opinion here is that Detroit, armpit of the midwest, (looks like most of you guys are in coastal areas) is lacking in quality fresh seafood & chefs who really know & love seafood are gonna move closer to the ocean. This results in a customer base that largely doesn't know any better and accepts seafood that is overcooked & texturally chalenged. Lucky reminded me of the other reason he blanches them. They plump & look larger on the plate!

 

Ed -  Lets not be overly harsh please. In this example, we are doing something incredibly wrong.  We actually blanch them as they come in! This may have started as a way to get an extra day some time ago but now it is standard practice. But really, all we are doing is changing the the texture. We are not serving bad food that isn't safe to eat. Also there are somethings that we do very well. There are standards to follow and in the court of opinion, the chef's will always win out over mine. Please, if my views are warped or too extreme I am very open to changing them if like something about the alternative. But the way I view working, is it safe to eat, are we giving the customer what we say we are. These are non-negotiable I cannot work for someone who doesn't follow this. Everything else is opinion if the chef cares to hear mine good. If not, would you suggest that I go behind his back & cross him anyway? He is the boss & it's his choice to run the kitchen as he sees fit, just as it's mine to leave & get another job. If he was really as retarded as this scallop thing makes him look (sorry I really didn't expect this kind of reaction), I wouldn't be working there. Probably a good chance he wouldn't be either.

 

I think that about covers it. For some reason I can read your comments on my phone, but if the thread gets to be longer than 10 or so replies, I can't post a reply. So I've been reading & thinking about this, I'm sure anything I forgot couldn't have been that important any way!


Edited by Sparkie - 3/7/11 at 4:43pm
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
post #22 of 22

Sparkie, nice to know you didn't mind my joke, even if  -I have to admit- it was a little sarcastic but never intended to harm!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking

Gear mentioned in this thread: