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Danish pastry does not rise.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Over the years I have tried to make danish pastry using many different recipes. The latest one was from the book "The Joy of Pastry". I have posted the instructions below. I followed the instructions below then let the dough rest in the refrigerator overnight. I then rolled it out to make swirled fruit pockets. I put them on a baking sheet and into the oven set at 75 degrees F to rise. After 45 minutes I saw no increase in size. I waited an additional hour, checking often, and still no rise. What am I missing?

 

Bob

 

 

 

RECIPE

 

Danish pastry should be flaky like croissants, and rich and sweet as a cake. It is turned (again, much like croissants) but unfermented, and used only for desserts and breakfast cakes.

1 In a large bowl, cream together the yeast, sugar, and salt. Add the yolks, one at a time, until the mixture is smooth. Then add the vanilla, orange rind, and milk. Scrape down the bowl, mix again, and add 4 cups of the flour. Mix again until smooth, about 2 or 3 minutes. Don't over-mix.

2 Cover the bowl and place dough in the refrig­erator. Chill for about 1 to I1A> hours. This dough will not rise very much (seemingly not at all) because of the rich egg yolks inhibiting the essential structure of the dough, but this rest will serve not to ferment the dough but to relax the gluten strands, making it easier to handle later. Chilling the dough also makes it more compatible with the cold butter which will be incorporat­ed later.


 

3 Meanwhile, soften the butter with the remain­ing flour, keeping the butter covered with the flour while cutting and kneading it quickly with a pastry scraper. Feel for cold lumps in the butter and break them up; add a bit more flour if necessary to soften the butter without melting it. Shape the butter into a 6-inch square.

4 Remove the chilled dough carefully and drop it onto a well-floured surface. Roll a flap from each of the 4 corners and wrap up the softened butter. Roll the dough into a rectangle about 20 inches long and 8 inches wide. Bring both ends toward the center like a book, leaving a small space in between for the spine. Fold in half, "closing" the book. Give the dough a one-quarter turn, then roll out to a rectangle and fold again. Chill for one hour, then roll out, fold, and turn again. Chill for one hour, then make one final turn and fold. After 4 turns, the dough must be refrigerated at least 3 to 4 hours before using. Remember that Danish dough is strictly for dessert. Don't handle the dough or roll it more than necessary, lest it develop too much elasticity, or chewiness.

 

danish01.jpg


Edited by bobj - 3/7/11 at 10:28am
post #2 of 9

Bob,

What does it mean to cream together the yeast,salt and sugar?

If your adding a good amount of salt you're killing off the yeast cells.

It's a good practice not to let them come in direct contact with each other.

For what that's worth.

Also, when you rest the books, it  long enough to get the dough and the butter the same temp,

Not sure this is gonna help you.

pan

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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

I did not put the yeast in until I added the milk. In fact I added the yeast to the milk first and waited until it started to activate. I rested the books about 1 hour in a refrigerator between folds.

 

Bob

 

post #4 of 9

Did you notice this part of the recipe: "This dough will not rise very much (seemingly not at all) because of the rich egg yolks inhibiting the essential structure of the dough, but..."  :)

 

So what yeast did you use and was it fresh enough?  Sometimes rich dough recipes specify an osmotolerant yeast and if regular yeast (ADY or IDY) is used you may need more.  Although I never proof yeast anymore for breads, I would consider doing so for rich doughs to make sure the yeast is happy and active enough.

post #5 of 9

Well, there you go.

Check your yeast.

Danish is a sweet dough not a yeast dough. You really need to let the gluten rest if not sleep.

The method above is confusing to me. but I suffer from acute chemo brain. Sweet dough needs only

3 turns 'envelope' not book. 4th is make-up. approx. 300 layers will get you there. Is the pic your snail? Appears

to be a little light. Also a little better with a smear in make up.

I would really like you to get a good product. How did you do previous times?

pan

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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

I used Active Dry Yeast. It was purchased about a week ago and has a date of Aug 25, 2012. I did proof the yeast in the milk. I have been using this yeast to make bread and it has worked well. I did use a little more yeast than it called for, about 25% more.

post #7 of 9

Well, it sounds like your yest is probably OK.  The yeast is not going to contribute as much texture to a Danish dough as will the butter lamination.  Most Danish dough recipes include a relatively small amount of yeast; much less than a yeasted bread dough.

 

The picture is raw dough just after shaping, yes?  Although you did not see visible rise (which is OK), how did the final product come out?  It should have been light and flaky.  If so, both the recipe and technique used was sufficient.  If not, I'd focus on the technique part, particularly the resting of the dough for gluten relaxation.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

The final product was about the same as the picture. It was flaky but VERY dense. I let the dough rest at least 1 hour between foldings and over night after the last one.

 

post #9 of 9

Hey Bob,

  I actually read through your post again. Please ignor my thoughts on folds. I use a completely different technique. I bring up my puff like that but not my danish and croissants.

I can PM you the way I add the butter and the folds if your interested.

  I also think you can proof at a little higher temp  90-100 and add moisture to the air. Rolled in doughs with fat and eggs take much longer to proof.

If it were me I would mix my yeast with some water and set aside.

Check the recipe, there should be part of the fat in the mix.

mix sugar, butter etc. add eggs as quickly as they will absorb.and mix till smooth.

scrape. add yeast, water,milk, van, cardamon etc. and mix again.

scrape. add the flour and salt.

You should really use a flour with sort of high protien. we use a blend of 8 lbs. bread and 2 lbs. cake

hths a little

jeff

 

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