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Best Pot for Mashed Potatoes?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hey I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best type of pot to get for cooking mashed potatoes? should I just go for a standard stainless steel?

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 16
I use stainless. No complaints here.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 16

I'd go with anything except almuminum, which sometimes imparts an off-flavor to spuds.

 

Stainless is fine.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 16

I'd be leery of an enameled pot. The masher might contribute to chipping.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 16

I've used enamalware for years, Phil, without running into that as a problem. But the prevention is simple, if it's a concern: for enamal, anodized, or non-stick, just use non-metallic tools.

 

At base, however, the idea of a specific pot for making mashed potatoes seems a little obsessive to me. Essentially I just grab whatever's handy of the right size.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 16

I have always used a stainless steel pot. Avoid aluminum if you can it can cause the potatoes to discolor. I think enamel is fine Phil and unless you are giving your pot a beating you won't chip it.

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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #7 of 16

If you go aluminum, use wood or plastic utensils. The aluminum imparts a "colour" or "taste" to food when metal utensils are used, as the metal "scrapes" the soft aluminum as you stir, mash, scrape etc.

post #8 of 16

I concur w/ this idea (LOL. I like using cool vocabulary). I'm the same way w/ handy and size, but I would add "clean" to those qualifications. 
 

Quote:

At base, however, the idea of a specific pot for making mashed potatoes seems a little obsessive to me. Essentially I just grab whatever's handy of the right size.


 

 

post #9 of 16

Any size stainless steel rondeau. Depends on how much mashed potatoes you're gonna make.

post #10 of 16

For me, Stainless.  Size just depends on how much you're planning to make.

 

As for aluminium, apart from taste issues, there would seem to be some evidence it's linked with contributing to Alziemer's (sp?) disease.  I tossed all my aluminium years ago.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #11 of 16

Safe to say, any metal that can "leech" into food, is just bette to stay away from. I've never gone into a restaurant and been like "hey you know what would go great with this (acidic) food? maybe some copper! "

post #12 of 16

there would seem to be some evidence it's linked with contributing to Alziemer's (sp?) disease.

 

DC, even in our world of news bites and broadcasters who can barely read let alone comprehend, this has to be the most mis-reported medical item in history.

 

There are two problems.

 

First of all, the study that showed a relationship of aluminum compounds building in part of the brain with Alziemers has never been replicated---and numerous researchers have tried. The feeling among professionals is that the lab tech working with the original study somehow did something in error. Whatever happened, the study is considered to be flawed and of no value.

 

Second, the consensus among professionals is that even if the original study had been valid, it merely indicates a direction for further research, as no causal relationship was established. What that means, on the assumption the study was accurate, is that it's possible that aluminum is a causative agent in the development of Alziemers. But it could also mean that for an undetermined reason, the Alziemer's, itself, causes those compounds to accumulate.

 

Don't get me wrong. I am not defending aluminum cookware. For a great number of reasons I dislike it, and won't use it. But the fact of the matter is, the jury is very much still out on the relationship between aluminum and health issues, in general, and with Alziemer's in particular.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 16

When I mash, using a food mill, i mash the potatoes straight into a stainless steel mixing bowl. Then I just put that bowl over the top of boiling water like a bane-marie.

post #14 of 16

I would say a nice cannabis indica like Kush would be the best type of pot to use for mashed potatoes... but it might effect the texture poorly... OH not that type of pot?

post #15 of 16

Sounds like something out of Shel Silverstein's old "The Hip Song:"

 

........I asked him if he could spare some pot

He said you're welcome, man, to anything that I've got

I've got steel pots, aluminum pots, cast iron, brass and copper......

 

Which sort of brings us full circle. thumb.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #16 of 16

They still use aluminium pots in the school kitchens I've worked in. Always cleaned to a high shine with steel wool pads. (another thing that should be evicted from the kitchen imo)

 

As far as choosing a pot for mash, Use a bigger pot than u think u need...So much easier and less mess.

 

 

I'm told its best to mash spuds next to an open window...Apparently it makes for fluffier mash...Cant say i've noticed a difference

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