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French Recipe Sites

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I know. ChefTalk is a rich source of recipes. But what I want is an extensive, and well organized source of recipes that I can simply look through and go "that there is something I must try!"  I've done some googling and most of the sites for french recipes I've found have had only a handful of recipes, or aren't well organized. Some look like something I could have made after the HTML 101 class I took in....sometime in the 90's. 

 

For example. italianfoodforever.com is (in my humble opinion) a great website and I have a hard time finding more sites like it, especially for other types of cuisines. Interested in finding a websites just as well organized and and rich of recipes for french and other types of cuisines. 

post #2 of 18

Just google 'French recicpe sites'.  Most will, of course, be written in French!

post #3 of 18

Pcieluck, I know some very good french internet sources, but they are obviously in french.

 

However, if you want a very good source for learning about french food, do buy this book. This is one of the books that will provide most wellknown french dishes and make you a good french cook! I regurarly make recipes from it and use it as a reference book when cooking many french dishes.

Most books from this series can be bought very cheaply, they are even hard to find, since being... mostly sold out. I bought my version in dutch a few years ago for something like 10 euros. Best investment in a fantastic cooking book ever.

Here it is in english fo french cooking;

http://www.amazon.com/France-Sarah-Randell-Maria-Villegas/dp/1740452852/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1300191173&sr=1-6

 

Same as above, but for Italian cooking. Also an absolute must!!! 

http://www.amazon.com/Food-Italy-Sophie-Braimbridge/dp/1552851486/ref=pd_sim_b_4 

 

Both books were initially made by murdoch books. www.murdochbooks.com.au

 

post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have a few books already, and i've definitely learned more from the books than websites so far. THe one thing I do love about books is that they almost always go on clearance at your local store, and can always be found used on amazon. But...books can still be damned expensive.  I'll be starting some french classes along with my culinary arts classes next year. (I opted out of spanish because I've worked with enough mexicans to know how to talk about food in spanish already.) So... recipes straight from the source shouldn't be an issue for too much longer. I can already identify the main ingredient in most recipes.  

post #5 of 18

Vas-y mon petit! Le meilleur site web à mon avis;

http://chefsimon.com/

 

Y para que no olvidarìa su espanõl, lo mejor de la gastronomìa. Tambièn en inglès. Estupendo!;

http://www.lomejordelagastronomia.com/ 

post #6 of 18

I've just started my own French recipe site, when I got married my mother-in-law wrote out a book of her "every day" recipes for my wife (who is French). Anyway, the short and long of it is that she never touched the book and I've been cooking for the past 15 years crazy.gif.

 

So I've put the site together to transmit the book to the rest of the familly and anyone else who might be interested.

 

The site is in French and English. Would love to get some feedback too... http://www.visualfragrance.com hope you enjoy.

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

So far so good, siloway. When you have more "meat dishes" posted though, I wouldn't mind proteins having their own category. For example, I need to get rid of a chicken thigh. So i can look at specifically "chicken" recipes rather than picking them out from a variety moo baah and oink.

post #8 of 18

Hi pcieluck,

 

thanks for the feedback, you can do a search from the front page on "chicken" but for the moment I'm using version 1.5 for joomla which only caters for 2 levels of categories, I'll upgrade to 1.6 when relevant extensions follow (1.6 has unlimited subcategories).

 

I may find a work around but there are unfortunately no components worthwhile that manage recipes... any developpers out there feeling bored...biggrin.gif

 

Thanks again.

 

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post

I know. ChefTalk is a rich source of recipes. But what I want is an extensive, and well organized source of recipes that I can simply look through and go "that there is something I must try!"  I've done some googling and most of the sites for french recipes I've found have had only a handful of recipes, or aren't well organized. Some look like something I could have made after the HTML 101 class I took in....sometime in the 90's. 

 

For example. italianfoodforever.com is (in my humble opinion) a great website and I have a hard time finding more sites like it, especially for other types of cuisines. Interested in finding a websites just as well organized and and rich of recipes for french and other types of cuisines. 



I'am actually trying to create exactly what you are after I like your example italianfoodforever.com. I'm doing all my own photography (all part of the fun) but havn't go enough time to keep up with everything (whilst looking for full time work to keep food in the fridge, electric to the fridge and house around the fridge tongue.gif). I would really love if anyone has any "original" recipes to contribute I will be happy to put them up (no cheese or beans on toast please). I currently have about another 30 or so from my mother in law's book then going to be looking for more material... organization and usability is key here.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

I think your sight has a lot of potential, and love what I see so far. I have a few chicken recipes I"m willing to contribute. They're more classic than original, but I do tend to do them my way.

 

Poor Man's Fricassee:

 

Skinless Chicken parts of choice.

Salt/Pepper

Onions

Garlic

Thyme

Parsley

Celery

Bay leaf

Chicken stock

Dry Sherry (optional)

 

In a heavy casserole pot,season and  brown chicken and set aside. Sweat onions and garlic, then deglaze pan with sherry, or just chicken stock if unavailable.  Add herbs and celery tied together as a bouquet, and bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer and add chicken, stew covered for 1 hour for chicken breasts, 2 for legs and thighs. Recommended to be accompanied with pomme puree.

 

 

 

Wet-Roasted Chicken:

 

Chicken parts of choice with skin

Thyme

Rosemary

Bay leaf

Garlic

Parsley

Sherry wine

Chicken stock

 

Simple. combine all components in your casserole pot and  marinate for at least 4 hours.  Add herbs and enough liquid for chicken to be submerged a bit less than half way in marinade.  Roast skin side down at 425 for 20 minutes. Rotate, add vegetables of choice (carrots or potatoes work very well) then roast for 45 more minutes, or until skin is browned.  Strain liquid for a nice jus.

 

 

Chicken Chasseur

 

Chicken thighs and drums

Bacon cut into lardons

Mushrooms quartered

Potatoes in slices

Thyme

Parsley

Bay leaf

Basic tomato sauce

sherry wine

Basic tomato sauce

Chicken stock

 

Fry bacon until well rendered of fat and crispy, remove and set aside.  Seasons and fry chicken parts in bacon grease, then set aside.  Saute mushrooms, deglaze the pan with sherry then return chicken and bacon to the pot. Add enough tomato sauce and chicken stock to cover chicken about half way. Add herbs in a bouquet, and stew covered for 1 1/2 hours. Add potatoes, and cook until potatoes are tender. Discard bouquet, and add chopped parsley.

 

Again, recipes I'm sure you may have already seen but no french recipe book should be without a fricassee, a roast, and a chasseur IMO. And my good camera hasn't been working, or I'd send a few pictures for you. Right now I have only crappy iPhone photos of these dishes. And yes I know they are a tad repetitive with the sherry and the same herbs in all of those.


Edited by pcieluck - 3/26/11 at 11:39pm
post #11 of 18

Thank you very much, I have a chasseur but I'll use your version as an alternative and the other two are great. Thanks a million. Just have to translate to French now as I'm making a point of honor of having all recipes in both languages, that's why it may take a while to fill the site but I'm not in a hurry on this one...

 

What's born out of passion is pleasure to grow and rewards are reaped with coming of age.

 

That was my word of wisdom for the day wink.gif

 

 

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
id like those translations just so I know how to say "poor man's fricasssee"
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post

id like those translations just so I know how to say "poor man's fricasssee"


"Fricassée du pauvre" is how zeu French would say it wink.gif the translations will be on http://www.visualfragrance.com once I get round to it, been putting a few fish recipes up there today.

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 

Not that I like reviving dead threads, but I was thinking about how much of the breakfast enjoyed here in America tends to be credited to French origins. Though, I kind of get the idea that only we fat Americans eat that stuff as breakfast rather than desert or a main dinner coarse. So really, I'm interested in a french recipe sight right with omelets and crepes, i suppose... Or am I promoting terrible stereotypes?

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post

Not that I like reviving dead threads, but I was thinking about how much of the breakfast enjoyed here in America tends to be credited to French origins. Though, I kind of get the idea that only we fat Americans eat that stuff as breakfast rather than desert or a main dinner coarse. So really, I'm interested in a french recipe sight right with omelets and crepes, i suppose... Or am I promoting terrible stereotypes?



What does it matter what time of day food is eaten?  I once had a japanese roomate that always started her day with a bowl of.... salad.  Yep.  As long as it's good food it doesn't matter.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by siloway View Post

I've just started my own French recipe site, when I got married my mother-in-law wrote out a book of her "every day" recipes for my wife (who is French). Anyway, the short and long of it is that she never touched the book and I've been cooking for the past 15 years crazy.gif.

 

So I've put the site together to transmit the book to the rest of the familly and anyone else who might be interested.

 

The site is in French and English. Would love to get some feedback too... http://www.visualfragrance.com hope you enjoy.


The site looks great man. I've yet to cook some truly traditional French food but I will now.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post

Not that I like reviving dead threads, but I was thinking about how much of the breakfast enjoyed here in America tends to be credited to French origins. Though, I kind of get the idea that only we fat Americans eat that stuff as breakfast rather than desert or a main dinner coarse. So really, I'm interested in a french recipe sight right with omelets and crepes, i suppose... Or am I promoting terrible stereotypes?



Having lived in France for a number of years I find most French people eat bread or toast with coffee for breakfast, mostly black. Camembert on toast dunked in coffee is a favorite. Croissants and pain au chocolats are often reserved for the lazy Sunday morning lie-ins when the man demonstrates his galantry by getting up early and going croissant hunting (at least that's what my wife led me to believe tongue.gif). I've also seen them eat ham and a variety of cured meats for breakfast although this is considered to be a bit more German and more often happens in Alsace or the Voges region close to the German border.

Melon is also nice in the morning and they are cheap in summer so many people have them for breakfast.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSlowCooker View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by siloway View Post

I've just started my own French recipe site, when I got married my mother-in-law wrote out a book of her "every day" recipes for my wife (who is French). Anyway, the short and long of it is that she never touched the book and I've been cooking for the past 15 years crazy.gif.

 

So I've put the site together to transmit the book to the rest of the familly and anyone else who might be interested.

 

The site is in French and English. Would love to get some feedback too... http://www.visualfragrance.com hope you enjoy.




The site looks great man. I've yet to cook some truly traditional French food but I will now.


Thanks for the feedback, I'll be posting a variety of different butters next week from garlic butter to orange butter and an assortment of sauces based on the roux basic sauce and building up to the supreme (if interested you can follow on twitter @frenchcooking4u or on the facebook fanpage which can be found by going to the website http://www.visualfragrance.com/ or searching facebook using frenchcooking4u). Hope you enjoy.

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