or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Culinary Students › General Culinary School Discussions › Taking Vacation When Working in a Kitchen?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Taking Vacation When Working in a Kitchen?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hey!

 

 

I've been working in the corporate world for about 2 years now and am looking to change careers.

 

I'm trying to learn as much as possible about the field before making the switch. Just curious- Is it even possible to take time off? Or is vacation more of a inbetween jobs type thing?

 

Thanks!

Molly


Edited by yellowflamingo - 3/21/11 at 9:44am
post #2 of 13

Molly,

The industry is still primitive in some ways, especially the kitchens, but there are usually vacations and time off. Holidays

could be different. In the Hospitality industry you are usually working when others play.

  Did you ever get by to see us? It won't take me an hour to talk you out of changing careers. just kidding ;>D

Jeff

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply
post #3 of 13

Hi Molly, I always love when I have new cooks apply and the first thing they want to know is about vacation, weekends off because they want to drink with their friends, Holidays off, to spend with family. If your new in the kitchen, don't expect much unless your working a Corp kitchen. 40 hour a week, no responsibility, no money, you get the idea. The best way a Chef can loose his job is to take a vacation, the powers to be will see how the kitchen can do without them and judge their needs for the operation. There is always someone ready to strut their stuff, ownership is always looking to pay less money. There is no security in this business, you only as good as your last Hurrah.....The thing I'm trying to get at is, you can't have your cake and eat it to, in this business..............ChefBillyB

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

haha yup- that's what I figured. Thanks Jeff and ChefBillyB!

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowflamingo View Post

Hello peeps!

 

I've been working in the corporate world for about 2 years now and am looking to change careers. I'm very new to the whole culinary world and looking to be in pastry.

 

Just curious- how does vacation work? Can you take a couple days to a week off when you are working in a kitchen? What about holidays?

 

Thanks!

Molly



Surely you are kidding. A few days off a week? Holidays are the Monday after. When you and the family go out sat. sun. and holidays, it is not robots preparing your food.

 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

Hi Molly, I always love when I have new cooks apply and the first thing they want to know is about vacation, weekends off because they want to drink with their friends, Holidays off, to spend with family. If your new in the kitchen, don't expect much unless your working a Corp kitchen. 40 hour a week, no responsibility, no money, you get the idea. The best way a Chef can loose his job is to take a vacation, the powers to be will see how the kitchen can do without them and judge their needs for the operation. There is always someone ready to strut their stuff, ownership is always looking to pay less money. There is no security in this business, you only as good as your last Hurrah.....The thing I'm trying to get at is, you can't have your cake and eat it to, in this business..............ChefBillyB

ChefBillyB,

   I'm sure you exaggerate the lack of security in the business.

pan

 

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post



ChefBillyB,

   I'm sure you exaggerate the lack of security in the business.

pan

 


I have been involved in over 25 restaurants, How many engineers do you know that worked for 25 or more companies in their life time ??????
 

 

post #8 of 13

It's sad to think the industry has not evolved in your area. I think that the current economy will weed out owners that you talk about.

Most owners that have management scared to take vacation usually don't have any insight into the business.

  In this area owners are getting very involved in their operations. Sure, money based decisions have to be made, but that old thinking of

paying your dues and ruling with a sharp stick to the eye are steadily evaporating.

  Owners have started networking and have their niches. There are the convienient places where people can eat out. Then There are many

places where the people go out to eat. for the experience. Chefs are promoted and very visable and have trained staff to help educate

their clientel. This allows them to pass on the cost.

  The larger houses/hotels are still in that cut labor theme. Those decisions are usually coming from some bean counter in a cubicle.

The revolving door down here is slowing.

panini

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

It's sad to think the industry has not evolved in your area. I think that the current economy will weed out owners that you talk about.

Most owners that have management scared to take vacation usually don't have any insight into the business.

  In this area owners are getting very involved in their operations. Sure, money based decisions have to be made, but that old thinking of

paying your dues and ruling with a sharp stick to the eye are steadily evaporating.

  Owners have started networking and have their niches. There are the convienient places where people can eat out. Then There are many

places where the people go out to eat. for the experience. Chefs are promoted and very visable and have trained staff to help educate

their clientel. This allows them to pass on the cost.

  The larger houses/hotels are still in that cut labor theme. Those decisions are usually coming from some bean counter in a cubicle.

The revolving door down here is slowing.

panini


Places like you are describing are really still few and far between. ChefBillyB's comment is unfortunately still quite the norm. You really are only as good as your last plate of food. The industry is still in its' infancy and there are still lots and lots of restaurant owners out there that can't cook or manage and who should not do either.

I too have been in over 25 places in my career...everything from mom and pops to corporate and I agree the situation is still quite bleak. 

 

post #10 of 13

Chefs Billy and Ross are right on the money! I notice you are an owner operator and you may be a good one., but in my over 50 years in this industry I have found most owners to  be willing to do anything to save a buck on the employees back.. I realize the owners job is not easy as I have been on both sides of the stick. Thank the lord I learned how to treat my employees by watching and working for some of the others, only they didn't learn. I had 4 successful places . Why? because I put my employees in insentive and percentage positions. I made more, and so did they. They took care of the places like it was their own. Until a lot of greedy owners learn this, the business will never change.This industry regardless of what propaganda you get from the NRA is still years behind all others excluding the farm laborors and landscape workers.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 13

Um,i think  Billy b is right-i've just spent 2+ years with no holiday while battling with an imbecilic management hell bent on cutting staff,quality, -oh,and costs,had i taken a week off they'd have me replaced in no time (or most likely not replaced)

Mind you,this was comming from an executive commitee of clowns with no Hospitality experience-instead i had a doctor,two motor mechanics,a fridge mechanic,an accountant and a tiler among others telling me how to run a kitchen!

post #12 of 13

I'm sorry but I laughed at your post, because you will spend each holiday and your typical day off will seem less convenient than the norm.  My first question I asked when I started working in kitchens was if my Mother would come eat in the restaurant on christmas when I begin working in high-end restaurants.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillipo View Post

Um,i think  Billy b is right-i've just spent 2+ years with no holiday while battling with an imbecilic management hell bent on cutting staff,quality, -oh,and costs,had i taken a week off they'd have me replaced in no time (or most likely not replaced)

Mind you,this was comming from an executive commitee of clowns with no Hospitality experience-instead i had a doctor,two motor mechanics,a fridge mechanic,an accountant and a tiler among others telling me how to run a kitchen!



I feel your pain when it comes to your owners and it sounds like you have it harder than me.  I have a financial advisor and a retired teacher.  The teacher is amazing... he does alot around the place and is the first person to volunteer to help us in the kitchen if we are short staffed on the weekend.  The financial advisor, well that's another story.  He is clueless as to what goes on in the kitchen and relies on the FOH supervisor to keep him informed so the info he is getting is her twist on things. 

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
Reply
OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Culinary Students › General Culinary School Discussions › Taking Vacation When Working in a Kitchen?