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Prawns with aniseed liqueur... surprisingly this works great

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

When I was living in Lyon, France a friend of mine took me to "Les Halles" which is basically one of Lyons several renound gastranomical centres...anyway won't bore you with more details but I first tasted prawns with aniseed liqueur there and they are amazing, recreated the recipe at home, dead simple.

 

  • A good handfull of prawns
  • A good piece of butter say 20-30g
  • Pastis - ricard or any other spirit that is minimum 40° proof as it needs to be flambéed
  • Couple of tablespoons of chopped parsley
  • 2 cloves of finely chopped garlic
  • Pepper
  • Salt

 

Throw the butter in a frying pan, when it heats up, toss in the garlic and caramelise a little.

 

Take the shells and intestines off the prawns and throw them in. Fry them over a medium heat until they cooked and very slighly browned.

 

Now throw in a cap or two of the aniseed liqueur, wait 5 seconds for it to heat, stand back and light it. Once it goes out, let the sauce caramelise a bit.

 

Put the prawns on a plate, coat with the cooking juices, thow some chopped parsley over it and enjoy.

 

I usually hate aniseed, this is the only way I have ever tolerated the stuff but man it's nice like that!

 

Enjoy.

 

More along the same lines on http://www.visualfragrance.com


Edited by siloway - 3/29/11 at 12:58am
post #2 of 8

Whilst I adore lots of French recipes, the idea of prawns (or langoustines) with Ricard doesn't really float my boat!

 

I believe you're Cornish - that's like a Cornish pasty with Tinner's Ale poured over it! 

 

 

(I visit Cornwall at least twice a year, the Roseland area!)

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Whilst I adore lots of French recipes, the idea of prawns (or langoustines) with Ricard doesn't really float my boat!

 

I believe you're Cornish - that's like a Cornish pasty with Tinner's Ale poured over it! 

 

 

(I visit Cornwall at least twice a year, the Roseland area!)

Lol, Actually I'm French, been in Cornwall for 4 years now, Cornish summer is my favorite day of the year lol.gif.

 

Surprisingly once you've finished caramelising the ingredients the aniseed flavour ends up being very subtle, a little like using dill with fish really... they are actually doing a beef and ale pasty now in padstow, you should try it next time you come down, it's yum, tastes like beef and ale stew in a bun smiles.gif
 

 

post #4 of 8

Four years?

You've got another 30 years before they think of you as a Cornishman!

 

Is that pasty an invention of Mr Stein???????  I think I'll pass - give me a good, home-made Cornish pasty, but a Cornish woman - lots of swede with the potatoes and beef, lots of salt and pepper and a pastry made with lard.  Manna from heaven!

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Four years?

You've got another 30 years before they think of you as a Cornishman!

 

Is that pasty an invention of Mr Stein???????  I think I'll pass - give me a good, home-made Cornish pasty, but a Cornish woman - lots of swede with the potatoes and beef, lots of salt and pepper and a pastry made with lard.  Manna from heaven!

 

They only call you cornish if you've been here for 8 generations or more and at least 3 of those generations married their sisters lol.gif.

 

Lol, I'll stick with the prawns in summer and the pasty for winter.
 

 

post #6 of 8
  • Quote Siloway; ...A good handfull of prawns... throw in a cap or two of the aniseed liqueur 
  •  
  • Pastis and seefood has always been a wonderful combination. It's frequently used in fishsoups. If you ask me, a fishsoup without a bit of pastis or raki or ouzo is missing something.
  • Please allow me to say that your proportions aren't quite right. I would say 1/2 tbsp maximum for that quantity of prawns may already be too much for most people. Pastis is extremely overpowering.
  • Maybe a few drops would be more like it?
  • For people who don't know pastis, I wouldn't call it a liqueur as there is no sugar in it.
  •  
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post

  • Quote Siloway; ...A good handfull of prawns... throw in a cap or two of the aniseed liqueur 
  •  
  • Pastis and seefood has always been a wonderful combination. It's frequently used in fishsoups. If you ask me, a fishsoup without a bit of pastis or raki or ouzo is missing something.
  • Please allow me to say that your proportions aren't quite right. I would say 1/2 tbsp maximum for that quantity of prawns may already be too much for most people. Pastis is extremely overpowering.
  • Maybe a few drops would be more like it?
  • For people who don't know pastis, I wouldn't call it a liqueur as there is no sugar in it.
  •  


yeah you're probably right about the quantities, just basic rough recipe...adapt as you wish, agreed pastis is more lique a spirit than a liqueur, the pastis does lose a faire bit of it's punch when it carmelises however ... potato pottato talker.gif.

 

post #8 of 8

Pastis is indeed a spirit and I love it. If people on this forum throw Marie Brizard in, you're on your own, lol.

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