or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chicken Crocketts

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone.  My husband and I ate at this family restaurant the other day, and we ordered Chicken Crockett's.  The owner bragged about how wonderful they were.  But they were terrible!  Now I am on a mission to make them myself, and show my husband how good they can be if made right.  Anyone have a good recipe for them?  Thank you in advance

post #2 of 28

There are lot of things that may be called croquettes.  Mashed potatoes with chopped chicken, breaded and fried?  That's a croquette.

post #3 of 28

circa 1947 Alabama community cookbook

 

1 chickens or 1 hen weighing 4 #

1 cup nut meats

salt and pepper

nutmeg

lemon juice

chopped parsley

1 egg

 

cook chicken until tender.  Remove from bones and run through food chopper. Add 1 cup nut meats, pepper, salt, nutmeg

lemon juice, and chopped parsley. roll in ground crumbs, then roll in beaten egg, then roll in crumbs again. Fry in deep fat.  Serve with cream sauce

 

There were no amounts other than those listed.  No binder for the croquettes....no nut meat specified.  

 

Personally, I'd cook a chicken in stock, pull off the bone/skin and chop the meat. add shallots or onion, minced celery, salt pepper maybe some thyme, lemon sounds good.....maybe mayo binder.  chill, make into golf ball size then bread them, fry.....serve with a chicken stock, 1/2 & 1/2 sauce....

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #4 of 28

Nuggets

 

"Three star" Chicken Nuggets 
From the cookbook "Recettes pour tous les jours", by Anne-Sophie Pic (3 Michelin Star)
For about twenty nuggets 

400g (14 oz or 0.8 lbs) skinless and boneless breast of chicken, raw 
20cl (1 cup)  very cold heavy cream (put 15 minutes in the freezer) 
1 egg white 
Salt and pepper 
For the breading : 
A bowl of all-purpose flour 
A bowl of beaten eggs (between 3 to 4 eggs) 
A bowl of breadcrumbs 
salt 
oil for frying

Cut the chicken into very small dices. Put a quarter of these dices aside and the rest in a food processor. Add the egg white, the cream and salt and pepper to taste and process.When the "chicken paste" is smooth, pour into a large mixing bowl, add the remaining diced chicken and stir. Season again if necessary. 

Put this mixture 15 minutes in the freezer. Roll out  a large rectangle of plastic film on a working surface. Place chicken paste in  a pastry bag and form a long 1 1/4 inches "sausage" on the center of the plastic wrap (leave room at the ends to tie the film). Wrap the paste tighly in the film, roll on the work surface, and knot the ends. If you have enough paste, you can make two "sausages". 

Boil water in a large saucepan, reduce to a simmer and cook the nugget roll(s) for 25 minutes. Remove them, let cool and cut into 0.4 inch slices.

For the breading process, prepare three bowls  filled respectively with: flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs. Dip each slice of chicken successively in these three plates (1-Flour, 2-beaten eggs, 3-breadcrumbs) and put in a frying pan with hot frying oil until golden brown on both sides. Remove from the pan and put on absorbing paper.Serve hot.

 

You can watch step by step photos there: http://www.paperblog.fr/2560884/nuggets-de-volaille-maison-selon-anne-sophie-pic/

 

nuggets-volaille-maison-selon-anne-sophie-pic-L-1.jpeg

post #5 of 28
On a somewhat related note the other day I stopped at a Carl's Jr. fast food place for some of the "hand breaded" chicken tenders they advertise.

Wow. The only seasoning I could detect in the breading was salt. Lots of salt. And the "chicken" had a really strange texture and mouth feel, like it was mechanically separated and poorly glued back together.

Someday it might be fun to make some decent croquettes. Come to think of it, we'll soon be having a couple over for dinner with their kids, who are in the 7 - 10 year old range, I think. They might like some chicken nuggets to munch on.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your reply.  These sound interesting, not quite what I had in mind though.  The ones I remembered had a log shape, and had a filling of chicken and mashed up vegetables, with a thick sauce of some kind, and then fried in deep fat.  But I am going to try yours too.  I appreciate the reply.

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 

Sounds good to me.  I guess I'm going to have to dig in some of my old cookbooks and see if I can find the kind I liked in the past.  Thank you

post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

Yes, your recipe sounded very close to what I think might be the one I'm looking for. I appreciate the reply.

post #9 of 28

True croquettes  of any kind be it ham. chicken, salmon always starts with a heavy Bechamel mixed with the chopped chicken, ham or whatever and seasonings and sauteed veges if any. Let get ice cold then form into pyramids or patties then bread. Usually deep fried. This is the true version according to Fanny Framer and Rombach. In the chicken version you can even grind up the skin. Great after Thanksgiving to use up turkey. Can also be made into small balls for an Hor D Ouvre. Potatoes were not used they were used with salted dried cod to make fishcakes which is a different prep.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #10 of 28

Ed is absolutely correct. But he left out one part: true croquettes are a pain in the butt to make. Even when you get the bechamel/other ingredients ratio just right, and chill the thing, and dust your hands with flour or dampen them, shaping them is a bear. That's why there are so many versions using other sorts of binders like potatoes, etc.

 

However, the flavor and texture difference between those others and the true gelt are worlds apart.

 

JollyButt, if they were rolled into logs it's more likely to have been a Spanish approach. French croquettes usually are pyramidical. Croquettes are a classic tapas, and are made with all sorts of fillings including ham, chicken, shrimp, and combinations of them. Hear's an example:

 

Chicken & Ham Croquettes

 

4 tbls olive oil

4 tbls flour

3/4 cup milk

1 cup cooked chicken, ground

2 oz Serrano or other cooked ham, finely chopped

1 tbls chopped flatleaf parsley

Pinch nutmet

Salt & pepper to taste

1 egg, beating

1 cup bread crumbs

Oil for deep frying

 

Heat olive oin in a pan, stir in flour, and cook another minute to remove raw taste. Remove pan from heat and whisk in the milk until smooth. Return to heat and slowly bring to a boil, stirring all the time, until the mixture thickens.

 

Remove pan from heat and add the chicken, stirring until mixture is smooth. Add thechopped ham, parsley, and nutmeg and mix well together. Season with salt and pepper.

 

Spread mixture out on a sheet pan or flat plate, and let it cool. Cover with plastic film, letting the film actually touch the mixture, and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight (which is better).

 

When ready to make the croquettes, put the egg and breadcrumbs in separate plates. Divide the mixture into 8 portions and, with dampened hands, form each portion into a cylinder. Dip in the egg wash, then roll in breadcrumbs. Put on a plate and chill in the fridge at least an hour.

 

Heat the oil to 350F. Fry the croquettes, a few at a time, until well brown and crisped through, about 5 minutes.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #11 of 28

OMG KY.  Got. To. Make. That. Now.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #12 of 28

Go for it, KK.

 

One thing that occurs to me. In America croquettes usually are thought of as a way of using up leftovers. In Europe they tend to be a dish that you start from scratch.

 

That is, here I would make croquettes after Thanksgiving as a way of using up leftover turkey. In Europe they would start with a raw turkey, and cook it specifically for making croquettes.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #13 of 28

FrechFries, Anne-Sophie Pic is indeed a well respected superchef! I learned from her to always precook potatoslices first to make a better gratin dauphinois.

The filling she describes for the croquette seems simple but is quite difficult to make, but very refined and delicious. Key factor is that the meat and eggwhite have to be icecold and not be heated by the foodprocessor or it will turn out bad. Mixtures like that are also often used in posh ravioli.

 

An easier method is indeed to start from a béchamel thickened with eggyolks like KYH explains. Many times chefs also add 2 soaked gelatinesheets in the hot preparation. It helps to set better and to work easier and the gelatine melts anyway while deepfrying.

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

One thing that occurs to me. In America croquettes usually are thought of as a way of using up leftovers. In Europe they tend to be a dish that you start from scratch.

 

 



Very true. That's also why you start with "cooked chicken, ground" and béchamel.

Starting from scratch would mean to make a stock first from a chicken and veggies, as usual. Then the sauce is made from roux and the stock in which the chicken has cooked, adding a little cream at the end. It's a matter of words, this time you would call that sauce probably a velouté, but the principle is the same as with béchamel.

post #15 of 28

KY Recipe is almost identacal to one I make, only we also grind in chicken skin if we have any. And I deep fried so did not use olive oil.  Chris recipe is indeed a veloute, as he adds stock to roux.

 

When we made cheese or potato or mushroom croquettes we made log shape.  Sometime we would add a raw egg to the mix.

 

Everybody loves croquettes.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #16 of 28

Perhaps I was unclear, Ed. The olive oil is just used for the roux. You could easily substitute butter with no problems. I list oil for deep frying separately, and, maybe, should have specified type.

 

The real key is to note the amount of flour in the roux compared to the quantity of liquid. This produces a very thick bechamel, almost a paste, which binds all the other ingredients together.

 

There's only one reason I can think of not to include the chicken skin: what would you then use for gribenis? tongue.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post

FrechFries, Anne-Sophie Pic is indeed a well respected superchef! I learned from her to always precook potatoslices first to make a better gratin dauphinois.


I know (I saw a video where she describes that method), I was surprised to learn that that's her method. From my discussions with my relatives, it also seems to be the original way gratin dauphinois was actually made (cooked on the stovetop, broiled at the end for color). Personally I've never tried it, always cooked the entire dish in the oven - but covered with foil for most of its cooking time. Perhaps we should start a gratin dauphinois thread? smile.gif

 

post #18 of 28

You are right bechamel has to be actually almost 1 1/2  to 2 times as thick as normal. For gribs I use pork skin its a new society.!

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #19 of 28

Then the sauce is made from roux and the stock in which the chicken has cooked, adding a little cream at the end.

 

I don't think so, Chris. While there would be nothing wrong with binding a croquette with veloute, that's not how they do it in Spain. Croquettes with all sorts of fillings are a mainstay in tapas bars. So they're obviously not depending on left-overs. But virtually every recipe I've seen for Spanish croquettes calls for a bechamel type sauce.

 

When I make stock I always start with cut up chickens as well as bones, but pull the chicken after about 40 minutes, stripping off the meat and returning the bones to the pot. Croquettes are one of the things I use that poached chicken for. But I start with a bechamel, despite having all that stock. Probably pernicious habit, is why. But I also think the bechamel makes for a richer, creamier interior than would the veloute.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #20 of 28

KYH, there's nothing wrong with using milk and make béchamel, nor with using stock and make a velouté. Both work for croquettes, even mixtures of that are often used.

And indeed, leftover meat asks for béchamel, plain and simple.

 

In my country, most popular are potato croquettes as a side dish, made from mashed potato + eggyolk + very little butter.

Very popular are croquettes crevette, made with Northsea shrimp using milk+ a stock drawn from the heads and shells. And a croquette with cheeses made from béchamel + mostly 3 cheese (Guyère, Emmenthal, parmezan).

Chicken and other meat croquettes aren't very popular over here, we prefer our vol-au-vent instead. BTW, Holland is the champ of meat croquettes!

The ultimate result in making both last mentioned croquettes, is to fry croquettes where the filling gently oozes out on your plate when cut.

post #21 of 28

OOZE   yea thats the way it's supposed to be made.. Here sometime they use a Duchess mix and form it into a pear shape with a clove as a stem . Its called Pear William Potato  almost a lost item in todays cooking world.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

You guys are awesome, thank you for the posts concerning my croquette problem. I was pulling out my older cookbooks to see how they were made in the 70;s or  80's . But your posts were so helpful, and I appreciate the suggestions so much.  I love to cook, but I also love making delicious dishes that everyone enjoys, it just makes my day.  rollsmile.gif

post #23 of 28

If you like them log shaped you can get a machine which makes it a lot easier.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQISOVrMao-sZaTXWGLyB6PhDIcTng-o0js3iuY4aWc4-XApQNc

 

 

post #24 of 28

Kuan, there's just something that's not right with log shapes.......

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

If you like them log shaped you can get a machine which makes it a lot easier.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQISOVrMao-sZaTXWGLyB6PhDIcTng-o0js3iuY4aWc4-XApQNc

 

 



Well, well, if it isn't the famous "mille croquettes" machine! One of these lived in my parents cellar, now more than 35 years ago and came to surface every time we made potato croquettes on festive days to serve with the main dish. Always potato croquettes, I don't remember any other being made with this very handy thing. Other croquettes -let's say béchamel based ones- were always handrolled or shaped.

Potato, shrimp and meat croquettes are mostly cylinder shaped, cheese croquettes squares. Although there's no law to do so.

Some high ranking chefs may offer croquettes made of... pig's trotters.

 

post #26 of 28

I'm worried about making them log shaped.  Do they have to be?  Or can they be blobs?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #27 of 28

Logs and pyramids are the two traditional shapes. But....It's your table, KK. Make 'em any shape you like.

 

Blobs are fine. Just use a large enough spoon so they stay soft inside while the outside is fried brown. And make each blob as near in size to the others as possible, so that they cook evenly.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #28 of 28

Chris, we take pig heads and make puck size "croquettes" with the meat....trotters thrown in would work.....

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking